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Tynwald
Tynwald
Tynwald
(Manx: Tinvaal), or more formally, the High Court of Tynwald (Manx: Ard-whaiyl Tinvaal) or Tynwald Court
Tynwald Court
is the legislature of the Isle of Man. It is believed (but not confirmed) to be the oldest continuous parliamentary body in the world, consisting of two Chambers, known as the Branches of Tynwald: the directly elected House of Keys and the indirectly chosen Legislative Council. When the two Chambers meet together once a month, they become Tynwald
Tynwald
Court. The Chambers sit jointly, on Tynwald Day
Tynwald Day
at St John's for largely ceremonial purposes, and usually once a month in the Legislative Buildings in Douglas
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Royal Family
A royal family is the immediate family of a king or queen regnant, and sometimes his or her extended family. The term imperial family appropriately describes the family of an emperor or empress, and the term papal family describes the family of a pope, while the terms baronial family, comital family, ducal family, grand ducal family, or princely family are more appropriate to describe the relatives of a reigning baron, count, duke, grand duke, or prince. However, in common parlance members of any family which reigns by hereditary right are often referred to as royalty or "royals." It is also customary in some circles to refer to the extended relations of a deposed monarch and his or her descendants as a royal family. A dynasty is sometimes referred to as "the House of ..."
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Voting System
An electoral system is a set of rules that determines how elections and referendums are conducted and how their results are determined. Political electoral systems are organized by governments, while non-political elections may take place in business, non-profit organisations and informal organisations. Electoral systems consist of sets of rules that govern all aspects of the voting process: when elections occur, who is allowed to vote, who can stand as a candidate, how ballots are marked and cast, how the ballots are counted (electoral method), limits on campaign spending, and other factors that can affect the outcome
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Lord Of Mann
Lord
Lord
is an appellation for a person or deity who has authority, control, or power over others acting like a master, a chief, or a ruler.[1][2] The
The
appellation can also denote certain persons who hold a title of the peerage in the United Kingdom, or are entitled to courtesy titles
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Queen's Counsel
A Queen's Counsel
Queen's Counsel
(postnominal QC), or King's Counsel (postnominal KC) during the reign of a king, is an eminent lawyer (usually a barrister) who is appointed by the Monarch to be one of "Her Majesty's Counsel learned in the law." The term is also recognised as an honorific. Membership exists in most Commonwealth jurisdictions around the world, while in the exceptions and in some former Commonwealth realms the name has been replaced by one without monarchical connotations, such as "Senior Counsel" or "Senior Advocate". Queen's Counsel
Queen's Counsel
is a status, conferred by the Crown, that is recognised by courts. Members have the privilege of sitting within the Bar of court. As members wear silk gowns of a particular design (see court dress), the award of Queen's Counsel
Queen's Counsel
is known informally as taking silk, and hence QCs are often colloquially called silks
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Member Of The Legislative Council
A legislative council is the name given to the legislature, or one of the legislative chambers of a nation, colony, or subnational division such as a province or state; or, in the United States, a council within a legislature which supervises nonpartisan legislative support staff
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Local Government In The Isle Of Man
A government is the system or group of people governing an organized community, often a state.[1] In the case of its broad associative definition, government normally consists of legislature, executive, and judiciary. Government
Government
is a means by which state policies are enforced, as well as a mechanism for determining the policy. Each government has a kind of constitution, a statement of its governing principles and philosophy. Typically the philosophy chosen is some balance between the principle of individual freedom and the idea of absolute state authority (tyranny). While all types of organizations have governance, the word government is often used more specifically to refer to the approximately 200 independent national governments on Earth, as well as subsidiary organizations.[2] Historically prevalent forms of government include aristocracy, timocracy, oligarchy, democracy, theocracy and tyranny
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Multiple Non-transferable Vote
Plurality-at-large voting, also known as block vote or multiple non-transferable vote (MNTV),[1] is a non-proportional voting system for electing several representatives from a single multimember electoral district using a series of check boxes and tallying votes similar to a plurality election. Multiple winners are elected simultaneously to serve the district. Block voting is not a system for obtaining proportional representation; instead the usual result is that where the candidates divide into definitive parties (especially for example where those parties have party lines which are whipped) the most popular party in the district sees its full slate of candidates elected, resulting in a landslide. The term "voting/plurality at-large" is in common usage in elections for representative members of a body who are elected or appointed to represent the whole membership of the body
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Indirect Election
An indirect election is a process in which voters in an election do not choose between candidates for an office, but rather elect persons who will then make the choice. It is one of the oldest forms of elections and is still used today for many upper houses and presidents. Some examples of indirectly elected bodies and individuals include:the election of the United States President
President
and the Vice President
President
is indirect election. Voters elect the Electoral College, which then elects the President
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Legislature
A legislature is a deliberative assembly with the authority to make laws for a political entity such as a country or city. Legislatures form important parts of most governments; in the separation of powers model, they are often contrasted with the executive and judicial branches of government. Laws enacted by legislatures are known as legislation. Legislatures observe and steer governing actions and usually have exclusive authority to amend the budget or budgets involved in the process. The members of a legislature are called legislators
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Richard Gozney
Sir Richard Hugh Turton Gozney KCMG CVO KStJ (born 21 July 1951) is a British career diplomat. He was Governor and Commander in Chief
Commander in Chief
of Bermuda
Bermuda
from 12 December 2007[1] to 18 May 2012. On 27 May 2016, he was sworn in as Lieutenant Governor of the Isle of Man.[2]Contents1 Background and education 2 Career summary 3 Honours 4 Publication 5 ReferencesBackground and education[edit] The son of Elizabeth Margaret Lilian Gardiner and Thomas Leonard Gozney, he was educated at Magdalen College School, Oxford, and St Edmund Hall, Oxford. He took a BA (Hons) degree in Geology in 1973
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Icelandic Language
Icelandic /aɪsˈlændɪk/ ( listen) (Icelandic: íslenska, pronounced ['iːs(t)lɛnska] ( listen)) is a North Germanic language, and the language of Iceland. It is an Indo-European language belonging to the North Germanic or Nordic branch of the Germanic languages. Historically, it was the westernmost of the Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
prior to the Portuguese settlement in the Azores. Icelandic, Faroese, Norn, and Western Norwegian formerly constituted West Nordic; Danish, Eastern Norwegian and Swedish constituted East Nordic. Modern Norwegian Bokmål
Bokmål
is influenced by both groups, leading the Nordic languages to be divided into mainland Scandinavian languages
Scandinavian languages
and Insular Nordic (including Icelandic). Most Western European languages have greatly reduced levels of inflection, particularly noun declension
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Norwegian Language
no – inclusive code Individual codes: nb – Bokmål nn – NynorskISO 639-2nor – inclusive code Individual codes: nob – Bokmål nno – NynorskISO 639-3 nor – inclusive code Individual codes: nob – Bokmål nno – NynorskGlottolog norw1258[2]Linguasphere 52-AAA-ba to -be; 52-AAA-cf to -cgAreas where Norwegian is spoken, including North Dakota
North Dakota
(where 0.4% of the population speaks Norwegian) and Minnesota
Minnesota
(0.1% of the population) (Data: U.S. Census 2000).This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Old Norse Language
Old Norse
Old Norse
was a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia
Scandinavia
and inhabitants of their overseas settlements during about the 9th to 13th centuries. The Proto-Norse language
Proto-Norse language
developed into Old Norse
Old Norse
by the 8th century, and Old Norse
Old Norse
began to develop into the modern North Germanic languages in the mid- to late 14th century, ending the language phase known as Old Norse. These dates, however, are not absolute, since written Old Norse
Old Norse
is found well into the 15th century.[2] Old Norse
Old Norse
was divided into three dialects: Old West Norse, Old East Norse, and Old Gutnish. Old West and East Norse formed a dialect continuum, with no clear geographical boundary between them
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Weald
The Weald
The Weald
/ˈwiːld/ is an area of South East England
South East England
between the parallel chalk escarpments of the North and the South Downs. It crosses the counties of Sussex, Hampshire, Kent
Kent
and Surrey
Surrey
and has three separate parts: the sandstone "High Weald" in the centre; the clay "Low Weald" periphery; and the Greensand Ridge, which stretches around the north and west of the Weald
Weald
and includes its highest points. The Weald
The Weald
once was covered with forest, and its name, Old English in origin, signifies "woodland"
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Elizabeth II Of The United Kingdom
Elizabeth II
Elizabeth II
(Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926)[a] is Queen of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the other Commonwealth realms. Elizabeth was born in London as the first child of the Duke and Duchess of York, later King George VI
George VI
and Queen Elizabeth, and she was educated privately at home. Her father acceded to the throne on the abdication of his brother King Edward VIII
King Edward VIII
in 1936, from which time she was the heir presumptive. She began to undertake public duties during the Second World War, serving in the Auxiliary Territorial Service
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