HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Tweed Ring
William Magear Tweed (April 3, 1823 – April 12, 1878)—often erroneously referred to as "William Marcy Tweed" (see below),[1] and widely known as "Boss" Tweed—was an American politician most notable for being the "boss" of Tammany Hall, the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in the politics of 19th century New York City and State. At the height of his influence, Tweed was the third-largest landowner in New York City
New York City
and a director of the Erie Railroad, the Tenth National Bank, and the New-York Printing Company, as well as proprietor of the Metropolitan Hotel.[2] Tweed was elected to the United States House of Representatives
United States House of Representatives
in 1852 and the New York County board of supervisors in 1858, the year he became the head of the Tammany Hall
Tammany Hall
political machine
[...More...]

"Tweed Ring" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

New York Senate
Majority caucus (32)     Republican (31)      Democrat Caucusing with Republicans (1)Minority caucus (29)     Democratic (29)Vacant (2)     Vacant (2)Length of term2 yearsAuthority Article III, New York ConstitutionSalary $79,500/year + per diemElectionsLast electionNovember 8, 2016Next electionNovember 6, 2018Redistricting Legislative ControlMeeting placeState Senate Chamber New York State Capitol Albany, New YorkWebsiteNYSenate.govThe New York State Senate
New York State Senate
is the upper house of the New York State Legislature, the New York State Assembly
New York State Assembly
being the lower house. It has 63 members each elected to two-year terms.[1] There are no limits on the number of terms one may serve
[...More...]

"New York Senate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Odd Fellows
Odd Fellows, or Oddfellows, also Odd Fellowship or Oddfellowship,[1] is an international fraternity consisting of lodges first documented in 1730 in London.[2][3] The first known lodge was called Loyal Aristarcus Lodge No. 9, suggesting there were earlier ones in the 18th century. Notwithstanding, convivial meetings were held "in much revelry and, often as not, the calling of the Watch to restore order."[2] Names of several British pubs today suggest past Odd Fellows affiliations
[...More...]

"Odd Fellows" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Patronage
Patronage is the support, encouragement, privilege, or financial aid that an organization or individual bestows to another. In the history of art, arts patronage refers to the support that kings, popes, and the wealthy have provided to artists such as musicians, painters, and sculptors. It can also refer to the right of bestowing offices or church benefices, the business given to a store by a regular customer, and the guardianship of saints. The word "patron" derives from the Latin: patronus ("patron"), one who gives benefits to his clients (see Patronage in ancient Rome). In some countries the term is used to describe political patronage, which is the use of state resources to reward individuals for their electoral support
[...More...]

"Patronage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Political Corruption
Political corruption
Political corruption
is the use of powers by government officials for illegitimate private gain. An illegal act by an officeholder constitutes political corruption only if the act is directly related to their official duties, is done under color of law or involves trading in influence. Forms of corruption vary, but include bribery, extortion, cronyism, nepotism, parochialism, patronage, influence peddling, graft, and embezzlement. Corruption
Corruption
may facilitate criminal enterprise such as drug trafficking, money laundering, and human trafficking, though is not restricted to these activities. Misuse of government power for other purposes, such as repression of political opponents and general police brutality, is also considered political corruption. Masiulis case is a typical example of political corruption. The activities that constitute illegal corruption differ depending on the country or jurisdiction
[...More...]

"Political Corruption" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ludlow Street Jail
Coordinates: 40°43′03″N 73°59′21″W / 40.7176°N 73.9893°W / 40.7176; -73.9893 The Ludlow Street Jail was New York City's Federal prison, located on Ludlow Street and Broome Street in Manhattan. Some prisoners, such as soldiers, were held there temporarily awaiting extradition to other jurisdictions, but most of the inmates were debtors imprisoned by their creditors. Seward Park Campus now sits on the site of the jail. Famous inmates[edit] The two most famous inmates of the Ludlow Street Jail were Victoria Woodhull and Boss Tweed.[citation needed] William "Boss" Tweed was a local politician and head of Tammany Hall, the name given to the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in New York City politics from the 1790s to the 1860s. After being arrested for bilking the city out of millions of dollars, Tweed jumped bail and was later apprehended in Spain. He was subsequently delivered to authorities in New York City on November 23, 1876
[...More...]

"Ludlow Street Jail" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lower East Side
The Lower East Side, sometimes abbreviated as LES, is a neighborhood in the southeastern part of the New York City
New York City
borough of Manhattan, roughly located between the Bowery
Bowery
and the East River, and Canal Street and Houston Street
[...More...]

"Lower East Side" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Manhattan
Coordinates: 40°47′25″N 73°57′35″W / 40.79028°N 73.95972°W / 40.79028; -73.95972Manhattan New York CountyBorough of New York City County of New York StateView from Midtown Manhattan facing south toward Lower ManhattanFlagEtymology: Lenape: Manna-hata (island of many hills)Nickname(s): The City[1]Location of Manhattan, shown in red, in New York CityCoordinates: 40°43′42″N 73°59′39″W / 40.72833°N 73.99417°W / 40.72833; -73.99417Country  United StatesState  New YorkCounty New York (Coterminous)City  New YorkSettled 1624Government • Type Borough (New York City) • Borough President Gale Brewer
[...More...]

"Manhattan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ulster-Scots
Ulster Scots, also known as Scotch-Irish, may refer to:the Ulster Scots people the Ulster Scots dialectsThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Ulster Scots. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
[...More...]

"Ulster-Scots" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cherry Street (Manhattan)
Coordinates: 40°42′41″N 73°59′20″W / 40.7114°N 73.9889°W / 40.7114; -73.9889East end of Cherry Street at the Vladeck Houses
Vladeck Houses
and Corlear's Hook Park.Eastern Cherry Street showing Corlears Hook Park and the Williamsburg BridgeCherry and Catherine Streets, 1848Cherry Street is a one-way street in the New York City
New York City
borough of Manhattan. It currently has two sections, mostly running along parks, public housing, co-op buildings, tenements, and crossing underneath the Manhattan
Manhattan
Bridge overpass.Contents1 Description 2 History 3 Notable places 4 ReferencesDescription[edit] Cherry Street's eastern terminus is at the intersection of FDR Drive's southbound service road and Grand Street, where it bends right and turns into Cherry Street. It then runs west for one block, along the north edge of Corlears Hook Park, to Jackson Street
[...More...]

"Cherry Street (Manhattan)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Quakers
Quakers
Quakers
(or Friends) are members of a historically Christian group of religious movements formally known as the Religious Society of Friends or Friends Church.[2] Members of the various Quaker movements are all generally united in a belief in the ability of each human being to experientially access "the light within", or "that of God
God
in every person". Some may profess the priesthood of all believers, a doctrine derived from the First Epistle of Peter.[3][4][5][6] They include those with evangelical, holiness, liberal, and traditional Quaker understandings of Christianity. There are also Nontheist Quakers whose spiritual practice is not reliant on the existence of a Christian God
[...More...]

"Quakers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bookkeeping
Bookkeeping
Bookkeeping
is the recording of financial transactions, and is part of the process of accounting in business.[1] Transactions include purchases, sales, receipts, and payments by an individual person or an organization/corporation. There are several standard methods of bookkeeping, such as the single-entry bookkeeping system and the double-entry bookkeeping system, but, while they may be thought of as "real" bookkeeping, any process that involves the recording of financial transactions is a bookkeeping process. Bookkeeping
Bookkeeping
is usually performed by a bookkeeper. A bookkeeper (or book-keeper) is a person who records the day-to-day financial transactions of a business. They are usually responsible for writing the daybooks, which contain records of purchases, sales, receipts, and payments
[...More...]

"Bookkeeping" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Freemasonry
Freemasonry
Freemasonry
or Masonry consists of fraternal organisations that trace their origins to the local fraternities of stonemasons, which from the end of the fourteenth century regulated the qualifications of stonemasons and their interaction with authorities and clients. The degrees of freemasonry retain the three grades of medieval craft guilds, those of Apprentice, Journeyman
Journeyman
or fellow (now called Fellowcraft), and Master Mason. These are the degrees offered by Craft (or Blue Lodge) Freemasonry. Members of these organisations are known as Freemasons or Masons. There are additional degrees, which vary with locality and jurisdiction, and are usually administered by different bodies than the craft degrees. The basic, local organisational unit of Freemasonry
Freemasonry
is the Lodge
[...More...]

"Freemasonry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

George Briggs (New York Politician)
Whig RepublicanProfession Hardware dealer, politicianThis article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (March 2018) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)George Briggs (May 6, 1805 – June 1, 1869) was an American politician and a United States Representative from New York.Contents1 Biography 2 Career 3 Death 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Born near Broadalbin, Fulton County, New York Briggs moved to Vermont in 1812 with his parents, who settled in Bennington. He attended the public schools. Career[edit] Biggs engaged in business as a dealer in hardware, and was a member of the Vermont House of Representatives in 1837
[...More...]

"George Briggs (New York Politician)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Volunteer Fireman
A volunteer fire department (VFD) is a fire department composed of volunteers who perform fire suppression and other related emergency services for a local jurisdiction. A volunteer fire department can act in support of a career or otherwise paid fire department, or it can act as the primary response agency in an area. This varies between jurisdictions. The first large organized force of firefighters was the Corps of Vigiles, established in ancient Rome in 6 AD. The term "volunteer" contrasts with career firefighters who are fully compensated for their services. Some volunteer firefighters may be part of a combination fire department that utilizes both full-time and volunteer firefighters. In this way, a station can be staffed 24 hours between volunteer and career firefighters
[...More...]

"Volunteer Fireman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bengal Tiger
The Bengal
Bengal
tiger ( Panthera
Panthera
tigris tigris) is the most numerous tiger subspecies in Asia, and was estimated at fewer than 2,500 individuals by 2011. Since 2008, it is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List and is threatened by poaching, loss and fragmentation of habitat
[...More...]

"Bengal Tiger" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.