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Turkish Lira
The Turkish lira
Turkish lira
(Turkish: Türk lirası; sign: ₺; code: TRY; usually abbreviated as TL)[2] is the currency of Turkey
Turkey
and the self-declared Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus
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Democrat Party (Turkey, Historical)
The Democratic Party (Turkish: Demokrat Parti, DP for short) was a Turkish moderately right-wing political party, and the country's third legal opposition party, after the Liberal Republican Party (Serbest Cumhuriyet Fırkası) established by Ali Fethi Okyar
Ali Fethi Okyar
in 1930, and the National Development Party (Milli Kalkınma Partisi) established by Nuri Demirağ
Nuri Demirağ
in 1945. Founded and led by Celâl Bayar, it was the first of the opposition parties to rise to power, de-seating the Republican People's Party (Cumhuriyet Halk Partisi) during the national elections of 1950 and ending Turkey's one party era
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Turkish State Mint
The Turkish State Mint (Turkish: Darphane) is a state-owned mint situated in Istanbul that is responsible for minting the coinage of Turkey. Originally founded in 1467, the mint replaced the Constantinople Mint as the largest mint of the Ottoman Empire to become its successor. Mention of the mint's establishment was recorded in the documents of Mehmed the Conqueror.[1] See also[edit]List of mints Central Bank of the Republic of TurkeyReferences[edit]^ "About Turkish State Mint". Turkish State Mint
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TC Resmi Gazete
TC, T.C., Tc, Tc, tc, tC, or .tc may refer to:Contents1 Arts and entertainment1.1 Film and television 1.2 Music 1.3 Video games2 Businesses and organizations 3 People 4 Places 5 Science and technology5.1 Biology and medicine 5.2 Chemistry and physics 5.3 Computing 5.4 Transportation 5.5 Other uses in science and technology6 Sports 7 Other usesArts and entertainment[edit] Film and television[edit]Theodore "T.C." Calvin, a character on the TV series Magnum, P.I. Tom Caron, American television host for New England Sports Network Top Cat, a cartoon character BBC Television Centre, a studio and office complex whose name is abbreviated to TC, and whose studios are numbered TC0-TC12Music[edit]TC Smith, American singer, for TCR Tom Constanten (born 1944), American musician from the Grateful Dead Top Combine, a Mandopop boy band TC (musician), a British drum and bass producer and DJVideo games[edit]X3: Terran Co
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İsmet İnönü
Mustafa İsmet İnönü
İsmet İnönü
(Turkish pronunciation: [isˈmet ˈinøny]; 24 September 1884 – 25 December 1973) was a Turkish general[1] and statesman, who served as the second President of Turkey from 11 November 1938, the day after the death of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, to 22 May 1950, when his Republican People's Party was defeated in Turkey's second free elections. He also served as the first Chief of the General
General
Staff from 1922 to 1924, and as the first Prime Minister after the declaration of the Republic, serving three terms: from 1923 to 1924, 1925 to 1937, and 1961 to 1965
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Guinness Book Of Records
Guinness
Guinness
World Records, known from its inception in 1955 until 2000 as The Guinness
Guinness
Book of Records and in previous United States
United States
editions as The Guinness
Guinness
Book of World Records, is a reference book published annually, listing world records both of human achievements and the extremes of the natural world. The brainchild of Sir Hugh Beaver, the book was co-founded by brothers Norris and Ross McWhirter in Fleet Street, London in August 1954. The book itself holds a world record, as the best-selling copyrighted book of all time. As of the 2017 edition, it is now in its 62nd year of publication, published in 100 countries and 23 languages. The international franchise has extended beyond print to include television series and museums
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Troy Weight
Troy weight
Troy weight
is a system of units of mass customarily used for precious metals and gemstones. One troy ounce (abbreviated "t oz" or "oz t") is equal to 7001311034768000000♠31.1034768 grams, (or about 1.0971 oz. avoirdupois, the "avoirdupois" ounce being the most common definition of an "ounce" in the US).[1] There are only 12 troy ounces per troy pound, rather than the 16 ounces per pound found in the more common avoirdupois system. However, the avoirdupois pound has 7000 grains whereas the troy pound has only 5760 grains (i.e. 12 × 480 grains). Both systems use the same grain defined by the international yard and pound agreement of 1959 as 6998647989100000000♠0.06479891 grams. Therefore, the troy ounce is 480 grains or 31.10 grams, compared with the avoirdupois ounce, which is 437.5 grains or 28.35 grams. The troy ounce, then, is about 10% heavier (ratio 192/175) than the avoirdupois ounce
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Libra (weight)
The ancient Roman units of measurement were largely built on the Hellenic system, which in turn was built upon Egyptian and Mesopotamian influences.[citation needed] The Roman units were comparatively consistent and well documented.Contents1 Length 2 Area 3 Volume3.1 Liquid measure 3.2 Dry measure4 Weight 5 Time5.1 Years 5.2 Weeks 5.3 Hours6 Unicode 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksLength[edit] The basic unit of Roman linear measurement was the pes or Roman foot (plural: pedes). Investigation of its relation to the English foot goes back at least to 1647, when John Greaves published his Discourse on the Romane foot
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Ancient Rome
In historiography, ancient Rome
Rome
is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome
Rome
in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and Roman Empire
Roman Empire
until the fall of the western empire.[1] The term is sometimes used to just refer to the kingdom and republic periods, excluding the subsequent empire.[2] The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian peninsula, dating from the 8th century BC, that grew into the city of Rome
Rome
and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed
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Million
1,000,000
1,000,000
(one million), or one thousand thousand, is the natural number following 999,999 and preceding 1,000,001
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2016 Turkish Coup D'état Attempt
Coup failed[12]Pro-coup soldiers take military leadership hostage, briefly seizing control over parts of the Turkish Armed Forces Turkish Parliament
Parliament
and Presidential Palace bombed[13][14] Shootouts between the loyal elements (of police and armed forces) and pro-coup soldiers occupying Ankara
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Five-pointed Star
A five-pointed star (☆), geometrically a regular concave decagon, is a common ideogram in modern culture
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Consumer Price Index
A consumer price index (CPI) measures changes in the price level of market basket of consumer goods and services purchased by households. The CPI is a statistical estimate constructed using the prices of a sample of representative items whose prices are collected periodically. Sub-indices and sub-sub-indices are computed for different categories and sub-categories of goods and services, being combined to produce the overall index with weights reflecting their shares in the total of the consumer expenditures covered by the index. It is one of several price indices calculated by most national statistical agencies. The annual percentage change in a CPI is used as a measure of inflation. A CPI can be used to index (i.e. adjust for the effect of inflation) the real value of wages, salaries, pensions, for regulating prices and for deflating monetary magnitudes to show changes in real values
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Monetary Inflation
Monetary inflation
Monetary inflation
is a sustained increase in the money supply of a country (or currency area). Depending on many factors, especially public expectations, the fundamental state and development of the economy, and the transmission mechanism, it is likely to result in price inflation, which is usually just called "inflation", which is a rise in the general level of prices of goods and services.[1][2] There is general agreement among economists that there is a causal relationship between monetary inflation and price inflation. But there is neither a common view about the exact theoretical mechanisms and relationships, nor about how to accurately measure it. This relationship is also constantly changing, within a larger complex economic system
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Mint (coin)
A mint is an industrial facility which manufactures coins that can be used in currency. The history of mints correlates closely with the history of coins. In the beginning, hammered coinage or cast coinage were the chief means of coin minting, with resulting production runs numbering as little as the hundreds or thousands. In modern mints, coin dies are manufactured in large numbers and planchets are made into milled coins by the billions. With the mass production of currency, the production cost is weighed when minting coins
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