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Tsunamis
A tsunami (from Japanese: 津波, "harbour wave";[1] English pronunciation: /tsuːˈnɑːmi/ tsoo-NAH-mee[2]) or tidal wave, also known as a seismic sea wave, is a series of waves in a water body caused by the displacement of a large volume of water, generally in an ocean or a large lake.[3] Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and other underwater explosions (including detonations of underwater nuclear devices), landslides, glacier calvings, meteorite impacts and other disturbances above or below water all have the potential to generate a tsunami.[4] Unlike normal ocean waves, which are generated by wind, or tides, which are generated by the gravitational pull of the Moon and the Sun, a tsunami is generated by the displacement of water. Tsunami
Tsunami
waves do not resemble normal undersea currents or sea waves because their wavelength is far longer.[5] Rather than appearing as a breaking wave, a tsunami may instead initially resemble a rapidly rising tide
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Indian Ocean
The Indian Ocean
Ocean
is the third largest of the world's oceanic divisions, covering 70,560,000 km2 (27,240,000 sq mi) (approximately 20% of the water on the Earth's surface).[1] It is bounded by Asia
Asia
on the north, on the west by Africa, o
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Plate Boundaries
Plate tectonics
Plate tectonics
(from the Late Latin
Late Latin
tectonicus, from the Greek: τεκτονικός "pertaining to building")[1] is a scientific theory describing the large-scale motion of seven large plates and the movements of a larger number of smaller plates of the Earth's lithosphere, since tectonic processes began on Earth
Earth
between 3 and 3.5 billion years ago. The model builds on the concept of continental drift, an idea developed during the first decades of the 20th century. The geoscientific community accepted plate-tectonic theory after seafloor spreading was validated in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The lithosphere, which is the rigid outermost shell of a planet (the crust and upper mantle), is broken into tectonic plates. The Earth's lithosphere is composed of seven or eight major plates (depending on how they are defined) and many minor plates
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Thrust Fault
A thrust fault is a break in the Earth's crust, across which younger rocks are pushed above older rocks.Contents1 Thrust geometry and nomenclature1.1 Reverse faults 1.2 Blind thrust faults 1.3 Fault-bend folds 1.4 Fault-propagation folds 1.5 Thrust duplex2 Tectonic environment 3 History 4 References 5 External linksThrust geometry and nomenclature[edit]Diagram of the evolution of a fault-bend fold or 'ramp anticline' above a thrust ramp, the ramp links decollements at the top of the green and yellow layersDiagram of the evolution of a fault propagation foldDevelopment of thrust duplex by progressive failure of ramp footwallAntiformal stack of thrust imbricates proved by drilling, Brooks Range Foothills, AlaskaReverse faults[edit] A thrust fault is a type of reverse fault that has a dip of 45 degrees or less.[1][2] If the angle of the fault plane is lower (often less than 15 degrees from the horizontal[3]) and the dis
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Alexandria
Alexandria
Alexandria
(/ˌælɪɡˈzændriə/ or /-ˈzɑːnd-/;[3] Arabic: الإسكندرية al-ʾIskandariyya; Egyptian Arabic: إسكندرية Eskendria; Coptic: Ⲁⲗⲉⲝⲁⲛⲇⲣⲓⲁ, Ⲣⲁⲕⲟⲧⲉ Alexandria, Rakotə) is the second-largest city in Egypt
Egypt
and a major economic centre, extending about 32 km (20 mi) along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
in the north central part of the country. Its low elevation on the Nile delta
Nile delta
makes it highly vulnerable to rising sea levels. Alexandria
Alexandria
is an important industrial center because of its natural gas and oil pipelines from Suez. Alexandria
Alexandria
is also a popular tourist destination. Alexandria
Alexandria
was founded around a small, ancient Egyptian town c. 331 BC by Alexander the Great
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Ammianus Marcellinus
Ammianus Marcellinus
Ammianus Marcellinus
(born c. 330[1], died c. 391 – 400) was a Roman soldier and historian who wrote the penultimate major historical account surviving from Antiquity (preceding Procopius)
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Ancient Rome
In historiography, ancient Rome
Rome
is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome
Rome
in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and Roman Empire
Roman Empire
until the fall of the western empire.[1] The term is sometimes used to just refer to the kingdom and republic periods, excluding the subsequent empire.[2] The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian peninsula, dating from the 8th century BC, that grew into the city of Rome
Rome
and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed
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1783 Calabrian Earthquakes
The 1783 Calabrian earthquakes
1783 Calabrian earthquakes
were a sequence of five strong earthquakes that hit the region of Calabria
Calabria
in southern Italy
Italy
(then part of the Kingdom of Naples), the first two of which produced significant tsunamis. The epicenters form a clear alignment extending nearly 100 km from the Straits of Messina
Straits of Messina
to about 18 km SSW of Catanzaro. The epicenter of the first earthquake occurred in the plain of Palmi. The earthquakes occurred over a period of nearly two months, all with estimated magnitudes of 5.9 or greater
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Mediterranean Sea
The Mediterranean Sea
Sea
is a sea connected to the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by the Mediterranean Basin
Mediterranean Basin
and almost completely enclosed by land: on the north by Southern Europe
Southern Europe
and Anatolia, on the south by North Africa
North Africa
and on the east by the Levant. Although the sea is sometimes considered a part of the Atlantic Ocean, it is usually identified as a separate body of water
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Meteorite
A meteorite is a solid piece of debris from an object, such as a comet, asteroid, or meteoroid, that originates in outer space and survives its passage through the atmosphere to reach the surface of a planet or moon. When the object enters the atmosphere, various factors like friction, pressure, and chemical interactions with the atmospheric gases cause it to heat up and radiate that energy. It then becomes a meteor and forms a fireball, also known as a shooting star or falling star; astronomers call the brightest examples "bolides." Meteorites vary greatly in size. For geologists, a bolide is a meteorite large enough to create a crater. Meteorites that are recovered after being observed as they transit the atmosphere or impact the Earth
Earth
are called meteorite falls. All others are known as meteorite finds
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Indonesia
Coordinates: 5°S 120°E / 5°S 120°E / -5; 120 Republic
Republic
of Indonesia Republik Indonesia  (Indonesian)FlagNational emblemMotto:  Bhinneka Tunggal Ika
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Aceh
Islam
Islam
98.19% Christian
Christian
1.12%
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Tidal Wave (other)
Tidal wave may refer to:Contents1 Seas and oceans 2 Film 3 Amusements 4 Military 5 Music5.1 Albums 5.2 Songs6 See alsoSeas and oceans[edit]A tidal bore, which is a large movement of water formed by the funnelling of the incoming tide into a river or narrow bay A storm surge, or tidal surge, which can cause waves that breach flood defences A tsunami, a series of water waves in a body of water caused by the displacement of a large volume of water, although this usage of "tidal wave" is not favored by the scientific community because tsunamis are not tidal in nature A megatsunami, which is an informal term to describe a tsunami that has initial wave heights that are much larger than normal tsunamis The crest (physics) of a tide as it moves around the EarthFilm[edit]Tidal Wave (1973 film), film base
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Kanji
Kanji
Kanji
(漢字; [kandʑi]  listen) are the adopted logographic Chinese characters
Chinese characters
that are used in the Japanese writing system.[1] They are used alongside hiragana and katakana
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Thucydides
Thucydides
Thucydides
(/θjuːˈsɪdɪdiːz/; Ancient Greek: Θουκυδίδης, Thoukydídēs, [tʰuːkydídɛːs]; c. 460 – c. 400 BC) was an Athenian
Athenian
historian and general. His History of the Peloponnesian War
History of the Peloponnesian War
recounts the fifth-century BC war between Sparta
Sparta
and Athens
Athens
until the year 411 BC
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