HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Trinisaura
Trinisaura
Trinisaura
is an extinct genus of ornithopod dinosaur known from the lower levels of the Late Cretaceous Snow Hill Island Formation (lower Campanian
Campanian
stage) of James Ross Island, Antarctica. It contains a single species, Trinisaura
Trinisaura
santamartaensis.[1] The species was in 2013 named by Rodolfo Aníbal Coria e.a. The generic name honours the geologist Trinidad Diaz
[...More...]

"Trinisaura" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Late Cretaceous
The Late Cretaceous
Cretaceous
(100.5–66 Ma) is the younger of two epochs into which the Cretaceous
Cretaceous
period is divided in the geologic timescale. Rock strata from this epoch form the Upper Cretaceous
Cretaceous
series
[...More...]

"Late Cretaceous" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Holotype
A holotype is a single physical example (or illustration) of an organism, known to have been used when the species (or lower-ranked taxon) was formally described. It is either the single such physical example (or illustration) or one of several such, but explicitly designated as the holotype. Under the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN), a holotype is one of several kinds of name-bearing types. In the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN) and ICZN the definitions of types are similar in intent but not identical in terminology or underlying concept. For example, the holotype for the butterfly Lycaeides idas
Lycaeides idas
longinus is a preserved specimen of that species, held by the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University
[...More...]

"Holotype" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Type Species
In zoological nomenclature, a type species (species typica) is the species name with which the name of a genus or subgenus is considered to be permanently taxonomically associated, i.e., the species that contains the biological type specimen(s).[1] A similar concept is used for suprageneric groups called a type genus. In botanical nomenclature, these terms have no formal standing under the code of nomenclature, but are sometimes borrowed from zoological nomenclature. In botany, the type of a genus name is a specimen (or, rarely, an illustration) which is also the type of a species name. The species name that has that type can also be referred to as the type of the genus name
[...More...]

"Type Species" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Extinct
In biology and ecology, extinction is the termination of an organism or of a group of organisms (taxon), normally a species. The moment of extinction is generally considered to be the death of the last individual of the species, although the capacity to breed and recover may have been lost before this point. Because a species' potential range may be very large, determining this moment is difficult, and is usually done retrospectively
[...More...]

"Extinct" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Megaannum
A year is the orbital period of the Earth
Earth
moving in its orbit around the Sun. Due to the Earth's axial tilt, the course of a year sees the passing of the seasons, marked by changes in weather, the hours of daylight, and, consequently, vegetation and soil fertility. In temperate and subpolar regions around the planet, four seasons are generally recognized: spring, summer, autumn and winter. In tropical and subtropical regions several geographical sectors do not present defined seasons; but in the seasonal tropics, the annual wet and dry seasons are recognized and tracked. The current year is 2018. A calendar year is an approximation of the number of days of the Earth's orbital period as counted in a given calendar. The Gregorian, or modern, calendar, presents its calendar year to be either a common year of 365 days or a leap year of 366 days, as do the Julian calendars; see below
[...More...]

"Megaannum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Campanian
The Campanian
Campanian
is, in the ICS' geologic timescale, the fifth of six ages of the Late Cretaceous
Cretaceous
epoch (or, in chronostratigraphy: the fifth of six stages in the Upper Cretaceous
Cretaceous
series). The Campanian spans the time from 83.6 ± 0.7 Ma to 72.1 ± 0.6 Ma (million years ago). It is preceded by the Santonian
Santonian
and it is followed by the Maastrichtian.[2] The Campanian
Campanian
was an age when a worldwide sea level rise drowned many coastal areas
[...More...]

"Campanian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Antarctica
Antarctica
Antarctica
(UK English /ænˈtɑːktɪkə/ or /ænˈtɑːtɪkə/, US English /æntˈɑːrktɪkə/ ( listen))[note 1] is Earth's southernmost continent. It contains the geographic South Pole
South Pole
and is situated in the Antarctic
Antarctic
region of the Southern Hemisphere, almost entirely south of the Antarctic
Antarctic
Circle, and is surrounded by the Southern Ocean. At 14,000,000 square kilometres (5,400,000 square miles), it is the fifth-largest continent. For comparison, Antarctica is nearly twice the size of Australia
[...More...]

"Antarctica" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Species
In biology, a species is the basic unit of classification and a taxonomic rank, as well as a unit of biodiversity, but it has proven difficult to find a satisfactory definition. Scientists and conservationists need a species definition which allows them to work, regardless of the theoretical difficulties. If as Linnaeus
Linnaeus
thought, species were fixed, there would be no problem, but evolutionary processes cause species to change continually, and to grade into one another. A species is often defined as the largest group of organisms in which two individuals can produce fertile offspring, typically by sexual reproduction. While this definition is often adequate, when looked at more closely it is problematic. For example, with hybridisation, in a species complex of hundreds of similar microspecies, or in a ring species, the boundaries between closely related species become unclear
[...More...]

"Species" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Specific Name (zoology)
In zoological nomenclature, the specific name (also specific epithet or species epithet) is the second part (the second name) within the scientific name of a species (a binomen). The first part of the name of a species is the name of the genus or the generic name. The rules and regulations governing the giving of a new species name are explained in the article species description.Example The scientific name for humans is Homo sapiens, which is the species name, consisting of two names: Homo is the "generic name" (the name of the genus) and sapiens is the "specific name".The grammar of species names[edit] Grammatically, a binomen (and a trinomen, also) must be treated as if it were a Latin
Latin
phrase, no matter which language the words were originally taken from
[...More...]

"Specific Name (zoology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cladogram
A cladogram (from Greek clados "branch" and gramma "character") is a diagram used in cladistics to show relations among organisms. A cladogram is not, however, an evolutionary tree because it does not show how ancestors are related to descendants, nor does it show how much they have changed; many evolutionary trees can be inferred from a single cladogram.[1][2][3][4][5] A cladogram uses lines that branch off in different directions ending at a clade, a group of organisms with a last common ancestor. There are many shapes of cladograms but they all have lines that branch off from other lines. The lines can be traced back to where they branch off. These branching off points represent a hypothetical ancestor (not an actual entity) which can be inferred to exhibit the traits shared among the terminal taxa above it.[4][6] This hypothetical ancestor might then provide clues about the order of evolution of various features, adaptation, and other evolutionary narratives about ancestors
[...More...]

"Cladogram" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Rodolfo Coria
Rodolfo is a given name
[...More...]

"Rodolfo Coria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Thescelosaurus Neglectus
ThescelosaurusTemporal range: Late Cretaceous, 66 Ma PreЄ Є O S D C P T J K Pg N↓Reconstructed skeleton, Burpee Museum of Natural HistoryScientific classification Kingdom: AnimaliaPhylum: ChordataClade: DinosauriaOrder: †OrnithischiaFamily: †ParksosauridaeSubfamily: †ThescelosaurinaeGenus: †ThescelosaurusGilmore, 1913Type species†Thescelosaurus neglectusGilmore, 1913Species†T. neglectus Gilmore, 1913 †T. garbanii Morris, 1976 †T. assiniboiensis Brown, Boyd, & Russell, 2011SynonymsBugenasaura Galton, 1995[1]Thescelosaurus (/ˌθɛsɪləˈsɔːrəs/ THESS-il-ə-SOR-əs; ancient Greek θέσκελος-/theskelos- meaning "godlike", "marvelous", or "wondrous" and σαυρος/sauros "lizard")[2] was a genus of small ornithopod dinosaur that appeared at the very end of the Late Cretaceous period in North America
[...More...]

"Thescelosaurus Neglectus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Basal (phylogenetics)
In phylogenetics, basal is the direction of the base (or root) of a rooted phylogenetic tree or cladogram. Clade
Clade
C may be described as basal within a larger clade D if its root is directly linked (adjacent) to the root of D. If C is a basal clade within D that has the lowest taxonomic rank of all basal clades within D, C may be described as the basal taxon of that rank within D. While there must always be two or more equally basal clades sprouting from the root of every cladogram, those clades may differ widely in rank[n 1] and/or species diversity. Greater diversification may be associated with more evolutionary innovation, but ancestral characters should not be imputed to the members of a less species-rich basal clade without additional evidence, as there can be no assurance such an assumption is valid.[1][2][3][n 2] In general, clade A is more basal than clade B if B is a subgroup of the sister group of A
[...More...]

"Basal (phylogenetics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hypsilophodon Foxii
Hypsilophodon (/ˌhɪpsɪˈlɒfoʊdɒn/; meaning "Hypsilophus-tooth") is an ornithischian dinosaur genus from the Early Cretaceous period of England. The first remains of Hypsilophodon were found in 1849; the type species, Hypsilophodon foxii, was named in 1869. Abundant fossil discoveries were made on the Isle of Wight, giving a good impression of the build of the species. It was a small bipedal animal with an herbivorous or possibly omnivorous diet. Hypsilophodon reached up to 1.8 metres (5.9 ft) in length, weighed about 20 kg (45 lbs), and was an agile runner. It had a pointed head equipped with a sharp beak used to bite off plant material, much like modern day parrots. Older studies have given rise to number of misconceptions about Hypsilophodon: that it would climb trees, was armoured, reached a length of 2.3 metres (7.5 ft), and was also found outside of Wight
[...More...]

"Hypsilophodon Foxii" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tenontosaurus
Tenontosaurus
Tenontosaurus
(/tɪˌnɒntoʊˈsɔːrəs/ ti-NON-toh-SOR-əs; meaning "sinew lizard") is a genus of medium- to large-sized ornithopod dinosaur. The genus is known from the late Aptian to Albian
Albian
ages of the middle Cretaceous
Cretaceous
period sediments of western North America, dating between 115 and 108 million years ago. The genus contains two species, Tenontosaurus
Tenontosaurus
tilletti (described by John Ostrom
John Ostrom
in 1970[1]) and Tenontosaurus
Tenontosaurus
dossi (described by Winkler, Murray, and Jacobs in 1997).[2] Many specimens of T. tilletti have been collected from several geological formations throughout western North America. T
[...More...]

"Tenontosaurus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.