HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Trinisaura
TRINISAURA is an extinct genus of ornithopod dinosaur known from the lower levels of the Late Cretaceous Snow Hill Island Formation (lower Campanian stage) of James Ross Island , Antarctica
Antarctica
. It contains a single species , TRINISAURA SANTAMARTAENSIS. The species was in 2013 named by Rodolfo Aníbal Coria e.a. The generic name honours the geologist Trinidad Diaz . The specific name refers to the Santa Marta Cove site where the specimen was in 2008 found by Coria and Juan José Moly . That same year, the find was reported in the scientific literature. The holotype , MLP-III-1-1, consists of a partial skeleton lacking the skull, of a subadult individual about 1.5 metres (4.9 ft) in length
[...More...]

"Trinisaura" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Campanian
The CAMPANIAN is, in the ICS ' geologic timescale , the fifth of six ages of the Late Cretaceous
Cretaceous
epoch (or, in chronostratigraphy : the fifth of six stages in the Upper Cretaceous
Cretaceous
series ). The Campanian spans the time from 83.6 ± 0.7 Ma to 72.1 ± 0.6 Ma (million years ago). It is preceded by the Santonian and it is followed by the Maastrichtian
[...More...]

"Campanian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

James Ross Island
JAMES ROSS ISLAND is a large island off the southeast side and near the northeastern extremity of the Antarctic Peninsula
Antarctic Peninsula
, from which it is separated by Prince Gustav Channel . Rising to 1,630 metres (5,350 ft), it is irregularly shaped and extends 64 km (40 miles) in a north–south direction. It was charted in October 1903 by the Swedish Antarctic Expedition under Otto Nordenskiöld
Otto Nordenskiöld
, who named it for Sir James Clark Ross
James Clark Ross
, the leader of a British expedition to this area in 1842 that discovered and roughly charted a number of points along the eastern side of the island. The style, "James" Ross Island
Ross Island
is used to avoid confusion with the more widely known Ross Island
Ross Island
in McMurdo Sound
[...More...]

"James Ross Island" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Antarctica
ANTARCTICA (UK English /ænˈtɑːktɪkə/ or /ænˈtɑːtɪkə/ , US English /æntˈɑːrktɪkə/ ( listen )) is Earth
Earth
's southernmost continent . It contains the geographic South Pole
South Pole
and is situated in the Antarctic
Antarctic
region of the Southern Hemisphere
Southern Hemisphere
, almost entirely south of the Antarctic
Antarctic
Circle , and is surrounded by the Southern Ocean . At 14,000,000 square kilometres (5,400,000 square miles), it is the fifth-largest continent. For comparison, Antarctica
Antarctica
is nearly twice the size of Australia
Australia
. About 98% of Antarctica
Antarctica
is covered by ice that averages 1.9 km (1.2 mi; 6,200 ft) in thickness, which extends to all but the northernmost reaches of the Antarctic
Antarctic
Peninsula
[...More...]

"Antarctica" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Species
In biology , a SPECIES is the basic unit of classification and a taxonomic rank , as well as a unit of biodiversity , but it has proven difficult to find a satisfactory definition. Scientists and conservationists need a species definition which allows them to work, regardless of the theoretical difficulties. If as Linnaeus
Linnaeus
thought, species were fixed, there would be no problem, but evolutionary processes cause species to change continually, and to grade into one another. A species is often defined as the largest group of organisms in which two individuals can produce fertile offspring , typically by sexual reproduction . While this definition is often adequate, when looked at more closely it is problematic . For example, with hybridisation , in a species complex of hundreds of similar microspecies , or in a ring species , the boundaries between closely related species become unclear
[...More...]

"Species" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ornithopod
ORNITHOPODS (/ɔːrˈnɪθəˌpɒdz, ˈɔːrnɪ-/ ) or members of the clade ORNITHOPODA (/ˌɔːrnɪˈθɒpədə/ or /ɔːrˌnɪθəˈpoʊdə, ˌɔːrnɪ-/ ) are a group of ornithischian dinosaurs that started out as small, bipedal running grazers, and grew in size and numbers until they became one of the most successful groups of herbivores in the Cretaceous
Cretaceous
world, and dominated the North American landscape. Their major evolutionary advantage was the progressive development of a chewing apparatus that became the most sophisticated ever developed by a non-avian dinosaur, rivaling that of modern mammals such as the domestic cow . They reached their apex in the duck-bills (hadrosaurs), before they were wiped out by the Cretaceous– Paleogene extinction event along with all other non-avian dinosaurs
[...More...]

"Ornithopod" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Late Cretaceous
The LATE CRETACEOUS (100.5–66 Ma ) is the younger of two epochs into which the Cretaceous period is divided in the geologic timescale . Rock strata from this epoch form the UPPER CRETACEOUS series . The Cretaceous is named after the white limestone known as chalk which occurs widely in northern France and is seen in the white cliffs of south-eastern England, and which dates from this time. CONTENTS * 1 Climate * 2 Geography * 3 Vertebrate fauna * 3.1 Dinosaurs * 3.2 Pterosaurs * 3.3 Mammals * 3.4 Marine life * 4 Flora * 5 Cretaceous– Paleogene mass extinction * 6 See also * 7 References CLIMATEDuring the Late Cretaceous, the climate was warmer than present, although throughout the period a cooling trend is evident. The tropics became restricted to equatorial regions and northern latitudes experienced markedly more seasonal climatic conditions
[...More...]

"Late Cretaceous" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

2013 In Paleontology
Paleontology
Paleontology
or palaeontology (from Greek : paleo, "ancient"; ontos, "being"; and logos, "knowledge") is the study of prehistoric life forms on Earth
Earth
through the examination of plant and animal fossils . This includes the study of body fossils, tracks (ichnites ), burrows , cast-off parts, fossilised feces (coprolites ), palynomorphs and chemical residues . Because humans have encountered fossils for millennia, paleontology has a long history both before and after becoming formalized as a science . This article records significant discoveries and events related to paleontology that occurred or were published in the year 2013
[...More...]

"2013 In Paleontology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Type Species
In zoological nomenclature , a TYPE SPECIES (species typica) is the species name with which the name of a genus or subgenus is considered to be permanently taxonomically associated, i.e., the species that contains the biological type specimen(s). A similar concept is used for suprageneric groups called a type genus . In botanical nomenclature , these terms have no formal standing under the code of nomenclature , but are sometimes borrowed from zoological nomenclature. In botany, the type of a genus name is a specimen (or, rarely, an illustration) which is also the type of a species name. The species name that has that type can also be referred to as the type of the genus name. Names of genus and family ranks, the various subdivisions of those ranks, and some higher-rank names based on genus names, have such types. In bacteriology , a type species is assigned for each genus
[...More...]

"Type Species" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Extinct
In biology and ecology , EXTINCTION is the end of an organism or of a group of organisms (taxon ), normally a species . The moment of extinction is generally considered to be the death of the last individual of the species, although the capacity to breed and recover may have been lost before this point. Because a species' potential range may be very large, determining this moment is difficult, and is usually done retrospectively. This difficulty leads to phenomena such as Lazarus taxa , where a species presumed extinct abruptly "reappears" (typically in the fossil record ) after a period of apparent absence. More than 99 percent of all species, amounting to over five billion species, that ever lived on Earth are estimated to be extinct. Estimates on the number of Earth's current species range from 10 million to 14 million, of which about 1.2 million have been documented and over 86 percent have not yet been described
[...More...]

"Extinct" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Specific Name (zoology)
In zoological nomenclature , the SPECIFIC NAME (also SPECIFIC EPITHET or SPECIES EPITHET) is the second part (the second name) within the name of a species (a binomen ). The first part of the name of a species is the name of the genus or the generic name. The rules and regulations governing the giving of a new species name are explained in the article species description . Example The scientific name for humans is Homo sapiens, which is the species name, consisting of two names: Homo is the "generic name " (the name of the genus) and sapiens is the "specific name". THE GRAMMAR OF SPECIES NAMESGrammatically, a binomen (and a trinomen , also) must be treated as if it were a Latin
Latin
phrase, no matter which language the words were originally taken from
[...More...]

"Specific Name (zoology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Holotype
A HOLOTYPE is a single physical example (or illustration) of an organism , known to have been used when the species (or lower-ranked taxon ) was formally described. It is either the single such physical example (or illustration) or one of several such, but explicitly designated as the holotype. Under the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN), a holotype is one of several kinds of name-bearing types . In the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN) and ICZN the definitions of types are similar in intent but not identical in terminology or underlying concept. For example, the holotype for the butterfly Lycaeides idas longinus is a preserved specimen of that species, held by the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University
Harvard University

[...More...]

"Holotype" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ankylopollexia
ANKYLOPOLLEXIA is an extinct clade of dinosaurs within the order Ornithischia
Ornithischia
that lived from the Late Jurassic to the Late Cretaceous . It is considered a more derived clade of iguanodontians and contains the subgroup Styracosterna and Hadrosauriformes . The name stems from the Greek word, “ankylos”, meaning stiff, fused, and the Latin word, “pollex”, meaning thumb. Originally described in 1986 by Sereno, this most likely synapomorphic feature of a conical thumb spine defines the clade. Many ankylopollexians have not yet been placed in the phylogeny because of the lack of data on the specimens or simply just not analyzed yet. One of the most famous and most derived members of the Ankylopollexia
Ankylopollexia
clade is the Iguanodon
[...More...]

"Ankylopollexia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Phylogenetic Analysis
In biology , PHYLOGENETICS /ˌfaɪloʊdʒəˈnɛtɪks, -lə-/ (Greek : φυλή, φῦλον - phylé, phylon = tribe, clan, race + γενετικός - genetikós = origin, source, birth) is the study of the evolutionary history and relationships among individuals or groups of organisms (e.g. species , or populations ). These relationships are discovered through phylogenetic inference methods that evaluate observed heritable traits, such as DNA
DNA
sequences or morphology under a model of evolution of these traits. The result of these analyses is a phylogeny (also known as a phylogenetic tree ) – a diagrammatic hypothesis about the history of the evolutionary relationships of a group of organisms. The tips of a phylogenetic tree can be living organisms or fossils, and represent the "end," or the present, in an evolutionary lineage. Phylogenetic analyses have become central to understanding biodiversity, evolution, ecology, and genomes
[...More...]

"Phylogenetic Analysis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hypsilophodon
HYPSILOPHODON (/ˌhɪpsɪˈlɒfoʊdɒn/ ; meaning "Hypsilophus-tooth") is an ornithischian dinosaur genus from the Early Cretaceous period of England. The first remains of Hypsilophodon were found in 1849; the type species , Hypsilophodon foxii, was named in 1869. Abundant fossil discoveries were made on the Isle of Wight , giving a good impression of the build of the species. It was a small bipedal animal with an herbivorous or possibly omnivorous diet. Hypsilophodon reached up to 1.8 metres (5.9 ft) in length, weighed about 20 kg (45 lbs), and was an agile runner. It had a pointed head equipped with a sharp beak used to bite off plant material, much like modern day parrots. Older studies have given rise to number of misconceptions about Hypsilophodon: that it would climb trees, were armoured, reached a length of 2.3 metres (7.5 ft) and were also found outside of Wight. During the past decades new research has gradually shown this to be incorrect
[...More...]

"Hypsilophodon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Thescelosaurus
†T. NEGLECTUS Gilmore, 1913 †T. GARBANII Morris , 1976 †T. ASSINIBOIENSIS Brown, Boyd, ancient Greek θέσκελος-/theskelos- meaning "godlike", "marvelous", or "wondrous" and σαυρος/sauros "lizard") was a genus of small ornithopod dinosaur that appeared at the very end of the Late Cretaceous period in North America. It was a member of the last dinosaurian fauna before the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event around 66 million years ago. The preservation and completeness of many of its specimens indicate that it may have preferred to live near streams. This bipedal ornithopod is known from several partial skeletons and skulls that indicate it grew to between 2.5 and 4.0 meters (8.2 to 13.1 ft) in length on average. It had sturdy hind limbs, small wide hands, and a head with an elongate pointed snout. The form of the teeth and jaws suggest a primarily herbivorous animal
[...More...]

"Thescelosaurus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.