HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Triacontadigon
In geometry, a triacontadigon (or triacontakaidigon) or 32-gon is a thirty-two-sided polygon. In Greek, the prefix triaconta- means 30 and di- means 2. The sum of any triacontadigon's interior angles is 5400 degrees. An older name is tricontadoagon.[1] Another name is icosidodecagon, suggesting a (20 and 12)-gon, in parallel to the 32-faced icosidodecahedron, which has 20 triangles and 12 pentagons.[2]Contents1 Regular triacontadigon1.1 Construction2 Symmetry 3 Dissection 4 Triacontadigram 5 ReferencesRegular triacontadigon[edit] The regular triacontadigon can be constructed as a truncated hexadecagon, t 16 , a twice-truncated octagon, tt 8 , and a thrice-truncated square
[...More...]

"Triacontadigon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

John H. Conway
John Horton Conway
John Horton Conway
FRS[2] (/ˈkɒnweɪ/; born 26 December 1937) is an English mathematician active in the theory of finite groups, knot theory, number theory, combinatorial game theory and coding theory. He has also contributed to many branches of recreational mathematics, notably the invention of the cellular automaton called the Game of Life
[...More...]

"John H. Conway" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Coxeter
Harold Scott MacDonald "Donald" Coxeter, FRS, FRSC, CC (February 9, 1907 – March 31, 2003)[2] was a British-born Canadian geometer. Coxeter is regarded as one of the greatest geometers of the 20th century. He was born in London
London
but spent most of his adult life in Canada. He was always called Donald, from his third name MacDonald.[3] He was most noted for his work on regular polytopes and higher-dimensional geometries
[...More...]

"Coxeter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Circumradius
In geometry, the circumscribed circle or circumcircle of a polygon is a circle which passes through all the vertices of the polygon. The center of this circle is called the circumcenter and its radius is called the circumradius. A polygon which has a circumscribed circle is called a cyclic polygon (sometimes a concyclic polygon, because the vertices are concyclic). All regular simple polygons, all isosceles trapezoids, all triangles and all rectangles are cyclic. A related notion is the one of a minimum bounding circle, which is the smallest circle that completely contains the polygon within it
[...More...]

"Circumradius" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Power Of Two
In mathematics, a power of two is a number of the form 2n where n is an integer, i.e. the result of exponentiation with number two as the base and integer n as the exponent. In a context where only integers are considered, n is restricted to non-negative values,[1] so we have 1, 2, and 2 multiplied by itself a certain number of times.[2] Because two is the base of the binary numeral system, powers of two are common in computer science
[...More...]

"Power Of Two" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Edge (geometry)
In geometry, an edge is a particular type of line segment joining two vertices in a polygon, polyhedron, or higher-dimensional polytope.[1] In a polygon, an edge is a line segment on the boundary,[2] and is often called a side. In a polyhedron or more generally a polytope, an edge is a line segment where two faces meet.[3] A segment joining two vertices while passing through the interior or exterior is not an edge but instead is called a diagonal.Contents1 Relation to edges in graphs 2 Number of edges in a polyhedron 3 Incidences with other faces 4 Alternative terminology 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksRelation to edges in graphs[edit] In graph theory, an edge is an abstract object connecting two graph vertices, unlike polygon and polyhedron edges which have a concrete geometric representation as a line segment
[...More...]

"Edge (geometry)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bisection
In geometry, bisection is the division of something into two equal or congruent parts, usually by a line, which is then called a bisector. The most often considered types of bisectors are the segment bisector (a line that passes through the midpoint of a given segment) and the angle bisector (a line that passes through the apex of an angle, that divides it into two equal angles). In three-dimensional space, bisection is usually done by a plane, also called the bisector or bisecting plane.Contents1 Line segment
Line segment
bisector 2
[...More...]

"Bisection" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cyclic Group
In algebra, a cyclic group or monogenous group is a group that is generated by a single element.[1] That is, it consists of a set of elements with a single invertible associative operation, and it contains an element g such that every other element of the group may be obtained by repeatedly applying the group operation or its inverse to g. Each element can be written as a power of g in multiplicative notation, or as a multiple of g in additive notation. This element g is called a generator of the group.[1] Every infinite cyclic group is isomorphic to the additive group of Z, the integers. Every finite cyclic group of order n is isomorphic to the additive group of Z/nZ, the integers modulo n
[...More...]

"Cyclic Group" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

John Horton Conway
John Horton Conway
John Horton Conway
FRS[2] (/ˈkɒnweɪ/; born 26 December 1937) is an English mathematician active in the theory of finite groups, knot theory, number theory, combinatorial game theory and coding theory. He has also contributed to many branches of recreational mathematics, notably the invention of the cellular automaton called the Game of Life
[...More...]

"John Horton Conway" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Directed Edge
In mathematics, and more specifically in graph theory, a directed graph (or digraph) is a graph that is a set of vertices connected by edges, where the edges have a direction associated with them.Contents1 Definition 2 Types of directed graphs2.1 Subclasses 2.2 Digraphs with supplementary properties3 Basic terminology 4 Indegree and outdegree 5 Degree sequence 6 Directed graph
Directed graph
connectivity 7 See also 8 Notes 9 ReferencesDefinition[edit] In formal terms, a directed graph is an ordered pair G = (V, A) where[1]V is a set whose elements are called vertices
[...More...]

"Directed Edge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Zonogon
In geometry, a zonogon is a centrally symmetric convex polygon.[1] Equivalently, it is a convex polygon whose sides can be grouped into parallel pairs with equal lengths and opposite orientations.Contents1 Examples 2 Tiling and equidissection 3 Other properties 4 Related shapes 5 ReferencesExamples[edit] A regular polygon is a zonogon if and only if it has an even number of sides.[2] Thus, the square, regular hexagon, and regular octagon are all zonogons
[...More...]

"Zonogon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Area
Area
Area
is the quantity that expresses the extent of a two-dimensional figure or shape, or planar lamina, in the plane
[...More...]

"Area" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Petrie Polygon
In geometry, a Petrie polygon
Petrie polygon
for a regular polytope of n dimensions is a skew polygon in which every (n – 1) consecutive sides (but no n) belongs to one of the facets. The Petrie polygon
Petrie polygon
of a regular polygon is the regular polygon itself; that of a regular polyhedron is a skew polygon such that every two consecutive side (but no three) belongs to one of the faces.[1] For every regular polytope there exists an orthogonal projection onto a plane such that one Petrie polygon
Petrie polygon
becomes a regular polygon with the remainder of the projection interior to it. The plane in question is the Coxeter plane
Coxeter plane
of the symmetry group of the polygon, and the number of sides, h, is Coxeter number
Coxeter number
of the Coxeter
Coxeter
group
[...More...]

"Petrie Polygon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

16-cube
In geometry, a hypercube is an n-dimensional analogue of a square (n = 2) and a cube (n = 3). It is a closed, compact, convex figure whose 1-skeleton consists of groups of opposite parallel line segments aligned in each of the space's dimensions, perpendicular to each other and of the same length. A unit hypercube's longest diagonal in n dimension is equal to n displaystyle sqrt n . An n-dimensional hypercube is also called an n-cube or an n-dimensional cube. The term "measure polytope" is also used, notably in the work of H. S. M. Coxeter (originally from Elte, 1912),[1] but it has now been superseded. The hypercube is the special case of a hyperrectangle (also called an n-orthotope). A unit hypercube is a hypercube whose side has length one unit
[...More...]

"16-cube" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.