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Traminer
Savagnin
Savagnin
or Savagnin
Savagnin
blanc (not to be confused with Sauvignon blanc) is a variety of white wine grape with green-skinned berries. It is mostly grown in the Jura region of France, where it is made into Savagnin
Savagnin
wine or the famous vin jaune and vin de paille.Contents1 History 2 Distribution and wines2.1 France 2.2 Germany 2.3 Switzerland 2.4 Australia3 Vine and viticulture 4 Synonyms 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingHistory[edit] The history of Savagnin
Savagnin
is complicated and not helped by its rather unstable genome. The story starts with the ancient Traminer variety, a green-skinned grape recorded in the Tyrolean village of Tramin
Tramin
from ca. 1000 until the 16th century. (This region now lies in the Italian province of South Tyrol)
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Grape
A grape is a fruit, botanically a berry, of the deciduous woody vines of the flowering plant genus Vitis. Grapes can be eaten fresh as table grapes or they can be used for making wine, jam, juice, jelly, grape seed extract, raisins, vinegar, and grape seed oil
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Swiss Alps
The Alpine region of Switzerland, conventionally referred to as the Swiss Alps
Alps
(German: Schweizer Alpen, French: Alpes suisses, Italian: Alpi svizzere, Romansh: Alps
Alps
svizras), represents a major natural feature of the country and is, along with the Swiss Plateau
Swiss Plateau
and the Swiss portion of the Jura Mountains, one of its three main physiographic regions
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Chiavenna
Chiavenna
Chiavenna
(Lombard: Ciavèna, Latin and Romansh:  Clavenna (help·info) or Claven, archaic German: Cläven or Kleven) is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Sondrio
Province of Sondrio
in the Italian region of Lombardy.[1] It is the centre of the Alpine Valchiavenna region. The historic town is a member of the Cittaslow movement.Contents1 Geography 2 History2.1 Antiquity 2.2 Middle Ages 2.3 Modern times3 Demographic evolution 4 Notable people 5 References 6 External linksGeography[edit] Chiavenna
Chiavenna
is located about 100 kilometres (62 mi) north of Milan and about 40 kilometres (25 mi) northwest of Sondrio. The town is situated on the right bank of the river Mera[1] about 16 kilometres (10 mi) north of Lake Como. The river course leads up to Val Bregaglia in the east and the Swiss border at Castasegna
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Vitis Vinifera
Vitis
Vitis
vinifera, the common grape vine, is a species of Vitis, native to the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
region, central Europe, and southwestern Asia, from Morocco
Morocco
and Portugal
Portugal
north to southern Germany
Germany
and east to northern Iran.[1] There are currently between 5,000 and 10,000 varieties of Vitis
Vitis
vinifera grapes though only a few are of commercial significance for wine and table grape production.[2] It is a liana growing to 32 m (35 yd) in length, with flaky bark. The leaves are alternate, palmately lobed, 5–20 cm (2.0–7.9 in) long and broad
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Château-Chalon AOC
Château-Chalon is an Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée for wines made in the Jura wine region of France, around the village of Château-Chalon. Only white wines from the Savagnin grape made in the vin jaune ("yellow wine") style can be made using this appellation. However, the Château-Chalon wines are not explicitly labeled as vin jaune. It is bottled in the traditional bottle called clavelin that is of a peculiar shape and with a capacity of 62 cl, which is, according to local legend, the amount left of a litre of wine after aging in cask for six years and three months - the legal minimum for Chateau Chalon. Once bottled, the wine is of great longevity, and can age for several decades.Contents1 Climate and geography 2 Wine production 3 Wine style 4 ReferencesClimate and geography[edit]Vineyards.Château-Chalon is located in hilly terrain in the eastern French wine region of Jura. The area has a continental climate, which includes very cold winters
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FINO
In computer science, FINO
FINO
(sometimes seen as "FISH", for first in, still here) is a humorous scheduling algorithm. It is an acronym for first in, never out as opposed to traditional first in, first out (FIFO) and last in, first out (LIFO) algorithms. FINO
FINO
works by withholding all scheduled tasks permanently. No matter how many tasks are scheduled at any time, no task ever actually takes place. This makes FINO
FINO
extremely simple to implement, but useless in practice. A stateful FINO
FINO
queue can be used to implement a memory leak. A mention of FINO
FINO
appears in the Signetics
Signetics
25120 write-only memory joke datasheet.[1] See also[edit]Bit bucket Black hole (networking) Null route /dev/null Write-only memoryReferences[edit]^ "" Signetics
Signetics
25120 Data Sheet"" (PDF)
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Flor
Flor
Flor
(Spanish and Portuguese for flower) is a winemaking term that refers to a film of yeast on the surface of wine, important in the manufacture of some styles of sherry. The flor is formed naturally under certain winemaking conditions, from indigenous yeasts found in the region of Andalucía
Andalucía
in southern Spain. Normally in winemaking, it is essential to keep young wines away from exposure to air by sealing them in airtight barrels, to avoid contamination by bacteria and yeasts that tend to spoil it. However, in the manufacture of sherries, the slightly porous oak barrels are deliberately filled only about five-sixths full with the young wine, leaving "the space of two fists" empty to allow the flor yeast to take form and the bung is not completely sealed
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Straw Wine
Straw
Straw
wine, or raisin wine, is a wine made from grapes that have been dried to concentrate their juice. The result is similar to that of the ice wine process, but suitable for warmer climates. The classic method dries clusters of grapes on mats of straw in the sun, but some regions dry them under cover, on roofs, or on modern racks, while some hang up the grapes or leave them to dry on the vine. The technique dates back to pre-Roman times, and most production of these wines has been in Northern Italy, Greece, and the French Alps. However producers in other areas are now starting to experiment with the method. Straw
Straw
wines are typically sweet to very sweet white wines, similar in density and sweetness to Sauternes and capable of long life. The low yields and labour-intensive production method means that they are quite expensive
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Dessert Wine
Dessert
Dessert
wines, sometimes called pudding wines, are sweet wines typically served with dessert. There is no simple definition of a dessert wine. In the UK, a dessert wine is considered to be any sweet wine drunk with a meal, as opposed to the white[1] fortified wines (fino and amontillado sherry) drunk before the meal, and the red fortified wines (port and madeira) drunk after it. Thus, most fortified wines are regarded as distinct from dessert wines, but some of the less strong fortified white wines, such as Pedro Ximénez
Pedro Ximénez
sherry and Muscat de Beaumes-de-Venise, are regarded as honorary dessert wines. In the United States, by contrast, a dessert wine is legally defined as any wine over 14% alcohol by volume, which includes all fortified wines - and is taxed more highly as a result
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Pagan
Paganism
Paganism
is a term first used in the fourth century by early Christianity
Christianity
for populations of the
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Pinot Blanc
Pinot blanc
Pinot blanc
is a white wine grape. It is a point genetic mutation of Pinot noir. Pinot noir
Pinot noir
is genetically unstable and will occasionally experience a point mutation in which a vine bears all black fruit except for one cane which produces white fruit.Contents1 Origins and regional production 2 Relationship to other grapes 3 Wine
Wine
characteristics 4 Names in other regions 5 See also 6 ReferencesOrigins and regional production[edit]An Oregon Pinot blanc.In Alsace, Germany, Luxembourg, Italy, Hungary, Czech Republic and Slovakia, the wine produced from this grape is a full-bodied white. In 2000, there were 1,300 hectares (3,200 acres) of Pinot blanc
Pinot blanc
in France,[1] with most of the plantations found in Alsace, where it is used for both still white wines and is the most common variety used for sparkling wine, Crémant d'Alsace
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Visperterminen
Visperterminen (Walser German: Tärbinu) is a municipality in the district of Visp in the canton of Valais in Switzerland.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Coat of arms 4 Demographics 5 Heritage sites of national significance 6 Politics 7 Economy 8 Religion 9 Education 10 Personalities 11 References 12 External linksHistory[edit] Visperterminen is first mentioned in the 11th Century as Termenum. In 1221 it was mentioned as Terminum.[3] Geography[edit]GibidumseeVisperterminen has an area, as of 2011[update], of 51.6 square kilometers (19.9 sq mi). Of this area, 32.1% is used for agricultural purposes, while 31.5% is forested. Of the rest of the land, 1.6% is settled (buildings or roads) and 34.7% is unproductive land.[4] The municipality is located in the Visp district. The municipality stretches from the valley located in the hills north-west of Visp and the Nanz valley over to the Mattwald and Simelihorn
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Valais
The canton of Valais (French pronunciation: ​[valɛ]; German: Kanton Wallis, German pronunciation: [ˈvalɪs] ( listen)) is one of the 26 cantons of Switzerland, situated in the southwestern part of the country, around the valley of the Rhône
Rhône
from its headwaters to Lake Geneva, separating the Pennine Alps
Pennine Alps
from the Bernese Alps. The canton is simultaneously one of the driest regions of Switzerland
Switzerland
in its central Rhône
Rhône
valley and among the wettest, having large amounts of snow and rain up on the highest peaks found in Switzerland. The canton of Valais is widely known for the Matterhorn and resort towns such as Crans-Montana, Saas Fee
Saas Fee
and Zermatt
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Albarino
Albariño
Albariño
(Galician pronunciation: [alβaˈɾiːɲo]) or Alvarinho (Portuguese: [aɫvaˈɾiɲu]) is a variety of white wine grape grown in Galicia (northwest Spain), Monção
Monção
and Melgaço (northwest Portugal), where it is used to make varietal white wines. Albariño
Albariño
is the Galician name for the grape; in Portugal
Portugal
it is known as Alvarinho, and sometimes as Cainho Branco.[1] It was presumably brought to Iberia by Cluny
Cluny
monks in the twelfth century[citation needed]. In Galician, its name "Albariño" comes from albar, and this from albo, both meaning "white, whitish" (and in Portuguese "Alvarinho" from alvar and alvo), and those from Latin albus, "white"[2]
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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