HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Trading Post
A trading post, trading station, or trading house was a place or establishment where the trading of goods took place; the term is generally used, in modern parlance, in reference to such establishments in historic Northern America, although the practice long predates that continent's colonization by Europeans. The preferred travel route to a trading post or between trading posts, was known as a trade route. Trading posts were also places for people to meet and exchange the news of the world or simply the news from their home country (many of the world's trading posts were located in places which were popular destinations for emigration) in a time when not even newspapers existed. European colonialism
European colonialism
traces its roots to ancient Carthage
[...More...]

"Trading Post" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Plains Indians
Plains Indians, Interior Plains
Interior Plains
Indians or Indigenous people of the Great Plains
Great Plains
and Canadian Prairies
Canadian Prairies
are the Native American tribes and First Nation band governments who have traditionally lived on the greater Interior Plains
Interior Plains
(i.e. the Great Plains
Great Plains
and the Canadian Prairies) in North America. Their historic nomadic culture and development of equestrian culture and resistance to domination by the government and military forces of Canada and the United States have made the Plains Indian culture groups an archetype in literature and art for American Indians everywhere. Plains Indians
Plains Indians
are usually divided into two broad classifications which overlap to some degree
[...More...]

"Plains Indians" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Indigenous Peoples Of The Americas
The indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
are the pre-Columbian peoples of the Americas
Americas
and their descendants. Although some indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
were traditionally hunter-gatherers—and many, especially in the Amazon basin, still are—many groups practiced aquaculture and agriculture. The impact of their agricultural endowment to the world is a testament to their time and work in reshaping and cultivating the flora indigenous to the Americas.[24] Although some societies depended heavily on agriculture, others practiced a mix of farming, hunting and gathering
[...More...]

"Indigenous Peoples Of The Americas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Spice Trade
The spice trade refers to the trade between historical civilizations in Asia, Northeast Africa
Africa
and Europe. Spices such as cinnamon, cassia, cardamom, ginger, pepper, and turmeric were known and used in antiquity for commerce in the Eastern World.[1] Opium
Opium
was a part of the spice trade and some people involved in the spice trade were driven by opium addiction.[2][3] These spices found their way into the Middle East
Middle East
before the beginning of the Christian era, where the true sources of these spices were withheld by the traders and associated with fantastic tales.[1] Early writings and stone age carvings of neolithic age obtained indicates that India's southwest coastal port Muziris, in Kerala, had established itself as a major spice trade centre from as early as 3000 BC, which marked the beginning of the spice trade
[...More...]

"Spice Trade" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Canada
Coordinates: 60°N 95°W / 60°N 95°W / 60; -95CanadaFlagMotto: A Mari Usque Ad Mare  (Latin) (English: "From Sea to Sea")Anthem: "O Canada"Royal anthem: "God Save the Queen"[1]Capital Ottawa 45°24′N 75°40′W / 45.400°N 75.667°W / 45.400; -75.667Largest city TorontoOfficial languagesEnglish FrenchEthnic groupsList of ethnicities74.3% European 14.5% Asian 5.1% Indigenous 3.4% Caribbean and Latin American 2.9% African 0.2% Oceanian[2]ReligionList of religions67.2% Christianity 23.9% Non-religious 3.2% Islam 1.5% Hinduism 1.4% Sikhism 1.1% Buddhism 1.0% Judaism 0.6% Other -[3]Demonym CanadianGovernment Federal parliamentary constitutional monarchy[4]• MonarchElizabeth II• Governor GeneralJulie Payette• Prime MinisterJustin Trudeau• Chie
[...More...]

"Canada" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "H
[...More...]

"United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fur
Fur
Fur
is the hair covering of non-human mammals, particularly those mammals with extensive body hair that is soft and thick. The stiffer bristles on animals such as pigs are not generally referred to as fur. The term pelage – first known use in English c. 1828 (French, from Middle French, from poil for "hair", from Old French
Old French
peilss, from Latin
Latin
pilus[1]) – is sometimes used to refer to the body hair of an animal as a complete coat. Fur
Fur
is also used to refer to animal pelts which have been processed into leather with the hair still attached
[...More...]

"Fur" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hudson's Bay Company
The Hudson's Bay Company
Hudson's Bay Company
(HBC; French: Compagnie de la Baie d'Hudson), is a Canadian retail business group. A fur trading business for much of its existence, HBC now owns and operates retail stores in Canada, the United States, and parts of Europe, including Belgium, The Netherlands, and Germany. The company's namesake business division is Hudson's Bay, commonly referred to as The Bay (La Baie in French).[7] Other divisions include Galeria Kaufhof, Gilt, Home Outfitters, Lord & Taylor, and Saks Fifth Avenue. HBC's head office was in the Simpson Tower in Toronto, but it relocated northwest of Toronto
Toronto
to Brampton, Ontario.[8] The company is listed on the Toronto
Toronto
Stock Exchange under the symbol "HBC". The company was incorporated by English royal charter in 1670 as The Governor and Company of Adventurers of England trading into Hudson's Bay
[...More...]

"Hudson's Bay Company" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Beaver
C. fiber – Eurasian beaver C. canadensis – North American
North American
beaver †C. californicusDistribution of C. fiber.Distribution of C. canadensis.Fossils of C. californicusThe beaver (genus Castor) is a large, primarily nocturnal, semiaquatic rodent. Castor includes two extant species, the North American
North American
beaver (Castor canadensis) (native to North America) and Eurasian beaver (Castor fiber) (Eurasia).[1] Beavers
Beavers
are known for building dams, canals, and lodges (homes). They are the second-largest rodent in the world (after the capybara). Their colonies create one or more dams to provide still, deep water to protect against predators, and to float food and building material. The North American beaver
North American beaver
population was once more than 60 million, but as of 1988 was 6–12 million
[...More...]

"Beaver" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Europe
Europe
Europe
is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia. Since around 1850, Europe
Europe
is most commonly considered as separated from Asia
Asia
by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus
Caucasus
Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways of the Turkish Straits.[5] Though the term "continent" implies physical geography, the land border is somewhat arbitrary and has moved since its first conception in classical antiquity
[...More...]

"Europe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Native Americans In The United States
American Indian and Alaska
Alaska
Native (2010 Census Bureau)[1] One race: 2,932,248 are registered In combination with one or more of the other races listed: 2,288,331 Total: 5,220,579 ~ 1.6% of the total U.S
[...More...]

"Native Americans In The United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Battle Of Ceuta
The conquest of Ceuta
Ceuta
(Spanish pronunciation: [ˈθeuta]) by the Portuguese on 21 August 1415 marks an important step in the beginning of the Portuguese Empire
Portuguese Empire
in Africa.Contents1 History 2 In popular culture 3 Notes 4 References 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Shortly after the conquest of the region by the Arabs from the Byzantine Empire, Ceuta
Ceuta
served as a staging ground in the Umayyad conquest of Hispania in 711, but it was destroyed in 740 and only rebuilt in the 9th century, passing to the Caliphate of Córdoba
Caliphate of Córdoba
in the 10th century. In the subsequent centuries it remained under the rule of the Almoravids and Almohades as well as various Andalusian Taifas
[...More...]

"Battle Of Ceuta" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Federal Government Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Congressional districts
[...More...]

"Federal Government Of The United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tribe
A tribe is viewed developmentally, economically, and/or historically, as a social group existing outside of or before the development of states. A tribe is a group of distinct people, dependent on their land for their livelihood, who are largely self-sufficient, and not integrated into the national society. It is perhaps the term most readily understood and used by the general public to describe such communities
[...More...]

"Tribe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Treaty Of Fort Clark
The Treaty of Fort Clark (also known as the Treaty with the Osage or the Osage Treaty) was signed at Fort Osage (then called Fort Clark) on November 10, 1808 (ratified on April 28, 1810) in which the Osage Nation ceded all the land east of the fort in Missouri and Arkansas north of the Arkansas River to the United States. The Fort Clark treaty and the Treaty of St. Louis in which the Sac (tribe) and Fox (tribe) ceded northeastern Missouri along with northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin were the first two major treaties in the newly acquired Louisiana Purchase. The affected tribes, upset with the terms, were to side with the British in the War of 1812. Following the settlement of that war, John C
[...More...]

"Treaty Of Fort Clark" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Osage Nation
The Osage Nation
Osage Nation
(/ˈoʊseɪdʒ/ OH-sayj) (Ni-u-kon-ska, "People of the Middle Waters") is a Midwestern Native American tribe of the Great Plains who historically dominated much of present-day Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas, and Oklahoma. The tribe developed in the Ohio
Ohio
and Mississippi
Mississippi
river valleys around 700 BC along with other groups of its language family. They migrated west of the Mississippi
Mississippi
after the 17th century due to wars with Iroquois
Iroquois
invading the Ohio
Ohio
Valley from New York and Pennsylvania in a search for new hunting grounds
[...More...]

"Osage Nation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.