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Toyota RAV4
The Toyota
Toyota
RAV4 (Japanese: トヨタ RAV4, Toyota
Toyota
Ravufō) is a compact crossover SUV (sport utility vehicle) produced by the Japanese automobile manufacturer Toyota. This was the first compact crossover SUV;[1] it made its debut in Japan and Europe in 1994,[2] and in North America in 1995. The vehicle was designed for consumers wanting a vehicle that had most of the benefits of SUVs, such as increased cargo room, higher visibility, and the option of full-time four-wheel drive, along with the maneuverability and fuel economy of a compact car. Although not all RAV4s are four-wheel-drive, RAV4 stands for "Recreational Activity Vehicle: 4-wheel drive", because the aforementioned equipment is an option in select countries.[3] In most markets, the RAV4 is the only compact SUV or crossover available from Toyota
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Toyota Motor Company
Toyota Motor Corporation
Toyota Motor Corporation
(Japanese: トヨタ自動車株式会社, Hepburn: Toyota
Toyota
Jidōsha KK, IPA: [toꜜjota], English: /tɔɪˈoʊtə/) is a Japanese multinational automotive manufacturer headquartered in Toyota, Aichi, Japan. In 2017, Toyota's corporate structure consisted of 364,445 employees worldwide[4] and, as of October 2016[update], was the fifth-largest company in the world by revenue. As of 2016, Toyota
Toyota
is the world's largest automotive manufacturer
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Toyota Corolla
The Toyota
Toyota
Corolla is a line of subcompact and compact cars manufactured by Toyota. Introduced in 1966, the Corolla was the best-selling car worldwide by 1974 and has been one of the best-selling cars in the world since then. In 1997, the Corolla became the best selling nameplate in the world, surpassing the Volkswagen Beetle.[1] Toyota
Toyota
reached the milestone of 40 million Corollas sold over eleven generations in July 2013.[2] The series has undergone several major redesigns. The name Corolla is part of Toyota's naming tradition of using names derived from the Toyota
Toyota
Crown for sedans, with "corolla" Latin
Latin
for "small crown".[3] The Corolla has always been exclusive in Japan to Toyota
Toyota
Corolla Store locations, and manufactured in Japan with a twin, called the Toyota
Toyota
Sprinter until 2000
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Toyota Corolla (E100)
The Corolla E100 was the seventh generation of cars sold by Toyota under the Corolla nameplate. This generation of Corolla was larger, heavier, and visually more aerodynamic than the model it replaced. With its 2465 mm (97 in) wheelbase, the Corolla had moved into the compact size class once occupied by the Corona and Camry. The Corolla again had an equivalent model Sprinter, with the Sprinter Trueno being equivalent to the Corolla Levin and both exclusive to Toyota
Toyota
Vista Store Japanese dealerships.Contents1 Design 2 Japan 3 Asia 4 North America 5 South America 6 Europe 7 Australia/New Zealand 8 ReferencesDesign[edit] Not only was the wheelbase increased, but the new Corolla also received a wider track than did the 90-series.[5] The chunky, solid design reflected the desire of development chief Dr. Akihiko Saito to make a 'mini-Lexus', to build on the recent successes of Toyota's new flagship range
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Front-wheel Drive
Front-wheel drive
Front-wheel drive
(FWD) is a form of engine and transmission layout used in motor vehicles, where the engine drives the front wheels only. Most modern front-wheel-drive vehicles feature a transverse engine, rather than the conventional longitudinal engine arrangement generally found in rear-wheel-drive and four-wheel drive vehicles.Contents1 Location of engine and transmission 2 History2.1 Prior to 1900 2.2
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Automobile Magazine
Automobile
Automobile
is an American automobile magazine published by the Motor Trend Group. A group of former employees of Car and Driver
Car and Driver
led by David E. Davis founded Automobile
Automobile
in 1986 with support from Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation[2][3]—using the credo No Boring Cars.[4] Automobile
Automobile
distinguishes itself as more of a lifestyle magazine than the other automotive publications, an editorial theme that Davis greatly expanded upon from his tenure as the editor of Car and Driver, though it is a sister publication to Motor Trend. Unlike most other automobile magazines, Automobile
Automobile
does not often do instrumented tests of cars or provide much technical data
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Toyota RAV4 EV
The RAV4 EV is an all-electric version of the popular RAV4 SUV produced by Toyota. Two generations of the EV model were sold in California, and to fleets elsewhere in the USA, with a gap of almost ten years between them. The first generation was leased from 1997 to 2003, and at the lessees' request, many units were sold after the vehicle was discontinued.[1] A total of 1,484 were leased and/or sold in California to meet the state’s mandate for zero-emissions vehicle.[2] A small number were sold or leased in fleet sales in other states
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Nickel-metal Hydride Battery
A nickel–metal hydride battery, abbreviated NiMH or Ni–MH, is a type of rechargeable battery. The chemical reaction at the positive electrode is similar to that of the nickel–cadmium cell (NiCd), with both using nickel oxide hydroxide (NiOOH). However, the negative electrodes use a hydrogen-absorbing alloy instead of cadmium
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Ōbu, Aichi
Ōbu (大府市, Ōbu-shi) is a city located in Aichi Prefecture, Japan. As of May 2015, the city had an estimated population of 88,812 and a population density of 2,640 persons per km². The total area was 33.66 square kilometres (13.00 sq mi).Contents1 Geography1.1 Neighboring municipalities2 History 3 Economy 4 Education 5 Transportation5.1 Railway 5.2 Highway6 Sister city relations 7 Noted people from Ōbu 8 References 9 External linksGeography[edit] Ōbu is located in the far northeastern neck of Chita Peninsula
Chita Peninsula
in southern Aichi Prefecture, and is bordered by the metropolis of Nagoya to the north. Neighboring municipalities[edit]Aichi Prefecture Nagoya
Nagoya
(Midori-ku) Tōkai Toyoake Kariya HigashiuraHistory[edit] The village of Ōbu was established on May 1, 1906 through the merger of seven small hamlets within Chita District, and was elevated to town status on November 1, 1915
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Automotive Design
Automotive design
Automotive design
is the process of developing the appearance, and to some extent the ergonomics, of motor vehicles, including automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, coaches, and vans. The functional design and development of a modern motor vehicle is typically done by a large team from many different disciplines included within automotive engineering, however, design roles are not associated with requirements for Professional or Chartered-Engineer qualifications. Automotive design
Automotive design
in this context is primarily concerned with developing the visual appearance or aesthetics of the vehicle, though it is also involved in the creation of the product concept. Automotive design
Automotive design
as a professional vocation[1] is practiced by designers who may have an art background and a degree in industrial design or transportation design
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Petrol Engine
A petrol engine (known as a gasoline engine in American English) is an internal combustion engine with spark-ignition, designed to run on petrol (gasoline) and similar volatile fuels. In most petrol engines, the fuel and air are usually mixed after compression (although some modern petrol engines now use cylinder-direct petrol injection). The pre-mixing was formerly done in a carburetor, but now it is done by electronically controlled fuel injection, except in small engines where the cost/complication of electronics does not justify the added engine efficiency. The process differs from a diesel engine in the method of mixing the fuel and air, and in using spark plugs to initiate the combustion process
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Diesel Engine
The diesel engine (also known as a compression-ignition or CI engine), named after Rudolf Diesel, is an internal combustion engine in which ignition of the fuel, which is injected into the combustion chamber, is caused by the elevated temperature of the air in the cylinder due to the mechanical compression (adiabatic compression). This contrasts with spark-ignition engines such as a petrol engine (gasoline engine) or gas engine (using a gaseous fuel as opposed to petrol), which use a spark plug to ignite an air-fuel mixture. Diesel engines work by compressing only the air. This increases the air temperature inside the cylinder to such a high degree that atomised diesel fuel injected into the combustion chamber ignites spontaneously. With the fuel being injected into the air just before combustion, the dispersion of the fuel is uneven; this is called a heterogeneous air-fuel mixture
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Curb Weight
Curb weight (American English) or kerb weight (British English) is the total mass of a vehicle with standard equipment and all necessary operating consumables such as motor oil, transmission oil, coolant, air conditioning refrigerant, and sometimes a full tank of fuel, while not loaded with either passengers or cargo. This definition may differ from definitions used by governmental regulatory agencies or other organizations
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D-4D
Common rail
Common rail
direct fuel injection is a direct fuel injection system for diesel engines. On diesel engines, it features a high-pressure (over 100 bar or 10 MPa or 1,500 psi) fuel rail feeding individual solenoid valves, as opposed to a low-pressure fuel pump feeding unit injectors (or pump nozzles)
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Automobile Platform
A car platform is a shared set of common design, engineering, and production efforts, as well as major components over a number of outwardly distinct models and even types of cars, often from different, but related marques.[2] It is practiced in the automotive industry to reduce the costs associated with the development of products by basing those products on a smaller number of platforms. This further allows companies to create distinct models from a design perspective on similar underpinnings.[2]Contents1 Definition and benefits 2 Examples 3 Advantages 4 Disadvantages 5 Top Hat 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDefinition and benefits[edit] Platform sharing is a product development method where different products and the brand attached share the same components.[3] The purpose with platform sharing is to reduce the cost and have a more efficient product development process.[4] The companies gain on reduced procurement cost by taking advantage of the commona
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Anti-lock Braking System
An anti-lock braking system or anti-skid braking system[1] (ABS) is an automobile safety system that allows the wheels on a motor vehicle to maintain tractive contact with the road surface according to driver inputs while braking, preventing the wheels from locking up (ceasing rotation) and avoiding uncontrolled skidding. It is an automated system that uses the principles of threshold braking and cadence braking which were practiced by skillful drivers with previous generation braking systems. It does this at a much faster rate and with better control than many drivers could manage. ABS generally offers improved vehicle control and decreases stopping distances on dry and slippery surfaces; however, on loose gravel or snow-covered surfaces, ABS can significantly increase braking distance, although still improving vehicle steering control.[2][3][4] Since initial widespread use in production cars, anti-lock braking systems have been improved considerably
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