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Erenagh
The medieval Irish office of erenagh (Old Irish: airchinnech, Modern Irish: airchinneach, Latin: princeps[1]) was responsible for receiving parish revenue from tithes and rents, building and maintaining church property and overseeing the termonn lands that generated parish income. Thus he had a prebendary role. The erenagh originally had a tonsure but took no other holy orders; he had a voice in the Chapter when they consulted about revenues, paid a yearly rent to the Bishop and a fine on the marriage of each daughter. The role usually passed down from generation to generation in certain families in each parish. After the Reformation and the Dissolution of the Monasteries the role of erenagh became subsumed in the responsibilities of the parson in each parish. The common surname McInerney is derived from the Irish, Mac an Airchinnigh (son of the erenagh)
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Thomas Larcom
Major-General Sir Thomas Aiskew Larcom, 1st Baronet PC FRS (22 April 1801 – 15 June 1879)[1][2] was a leading official in the early Irish Ordnance Survey that started in 1824. He later became a poor law commissioner, census commissioner and finally executive head of the British administration in Ireland as under-secretary to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland, a position the government of the day was eager for him to take. The longest-serving under-secretary (1853–1868), and a man of unusual abilities, Larcom had a distinguished career in his adopted country and acted with an impartiality that won him respect from all parties
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Ordnance Survey Of Ireland

Ordnance Survey Ireland (OSI; Irish: Suirbhéireacht Ordanáis Éireann) is the national mapping agency of Ireland. It was established on 4 March 2002 as a body corporate.[1] It is the successor to the former Ordnance Survey of Ireland. It and the Ordnance Survey of Northern Ireland (OSNI) are the ultimate successors to the Irish operations of the British Ordnance Survey. OSI is part of the Irish public service. OSI has made modern and historic maps of the state free to view on its website. OSI is headquartered at Mountjoy House in the Phoenix Park in Dublin
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Northern Ireland

Several studies and surveys carried out between 1971 and 2006 have indicated that, in general, most Protestants in Northern Ireland see themselves primarily as British, whereas a majority of Roman Catholics regard themselves primarily as Irish.[116][117][118][119][120][121][122][123] This does not, however, account for the complex identities within Northern Ireland, given that many of the population regard themselves as "Ulster" or "Northern Irish", either as a primary or secondary identity. Overall, the Catholic population is somewhat more ethnically diverse than the more homogeneous Protestant population. 83.1% of Protestants identified as "British" or with a British ethnic group (English, Scottish, or Welsh) in the 2011 Census, whereas only 3.9% identified as "Irish". Meanwhile, 13.7% of Catholics identified as "British" or with a British ethnic group
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Moorland
Moorland or moor is a type of habitat found in upland areas in temperate grasslands, savannas, and shrublands and montane grasslands and shrublands biomes, characterised by low-growing vegetation on acidic soils. Moorland, nowadays, generally means uncultivated hill land (such as Dartmoor in South West England), but also includes low-lying wetlands (such as Sedgemoor, also South West England). It is closely related to heath, although experts disagree on what precisely distinguishes both types of vegetation. Generally, moor refers to highland and high rainfall zones whereas heath refers to lowland zones which are more likely to be the result of human activity.[1] Moorland habitats mostly occur in tropical Africa, northern and western Europe, and neotropical South America. Most of the world's moorlands are very diverse ecosystems. In the extensive moorlands of the tropics, biodiversity can be extremely high
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Cess (tax)
Cess /sɛs/ is a tax. It is usually known as tax on tax. Cess is generally levied for promoting services like health, education, etc. Government often charges cess for the purpose of development in social sectors. Cess is levied on high income group people, as poor and middle income groups generally have lower tax rates. Through cess is levied by government, poor are benefitted. This a shortened form of "assess".[1] The spelling is due to a mistaken connection with census.[2] It was the official term used in Ireland when it was part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, but has been superseded by "rate"
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Ulster Scots Dialects

In 2005, Gavin Falconer questioned officialdom's complicity, writing: "The readiness of Northern Ireland officialdom to consign taxpayers’ money to a black hole of translations incomprehensible to ordinary users is worrying".[67] Recently produced teaching materials, have, on the other hand, been evaluated more positively.[68]

Sample texts

The three text excerpts below illustrate how the traditional written form of Ulster Scots from the 18th to early 20th century was virtually indistinguishable from contemporary written Scots from Scotland.[69]It is certainly not a written version of the vestigial spoken dialect of rural County Antrim, as its activists frequently urge, perpetrating the fallacy that it’s wor ain leid. (Besides, the dialect revivalists claim not to be native speakers of the dialect themselves!). The colloquialness of this new dialect is deceptive, for it is neither spoken nor innate
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Civil Parish

In England, a civil parish is a type of administrative parish used for local government. It is a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. Civil parishes can trace their origin to the ancient system of ecclesiastical parishes which historically played a role in both civil and ecclesiastical administration; civil and religious parishes were formally split into two types in the 19th century and are now entirely separate. The unit was devised and rolled out across England in the 1860s. A civil parish can range in size from a sparsely populated rural area with fewer than a hundred inhabitants, to a large town with a population in the tens of thousands. Eight parishes also have city status (a status granted by the monarch)
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