HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Totenkopfverbände
SS-Totenkopfverbände
SS-Totenkopfverbände
(SS-TV), rendered in English as Death's Head Units,[2] was the SS organization responsible for administering the Nazi concentration camps
Nazi concentration camps
for the Third Reich, among similar duties.[3] While the Totenkopf
Totenkopf
(skull) was the universal cap badge of the SS, the SS-TV also wore the Death's Head insignia on the right collar when needed; to distinguish itself from other Nazi Schutzstaffel
Schutzstaffel
(SS) formations. The SS-TV created originally in 1933 was an independent unit within the SS with its own ranks and command structure. It ran the camps throughout Germany
Germany
and later in occupied Europe
[...More...]

"Totenkopfverbände" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

German-occupied Poland
German-occupied Poland
Poland
during World War II
World War II
consisted of two major parts with different type of administration. Polish areas annexed by Nazi Germany
Polish areas annexed by Nazi Germany
following the Invasion of Poland at the beginning of World War II, nearly a quarter of the entire territory of the Second Polish Republic, were placed directly under the German civil administration
[...More...]

"German-occupied Poland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anschluss
Anschluss
Anschluss
(German: [ˈʔanʃlʊs] ( listen) 'joining') refers to the annexation of Austria
Austria
into
[...More...]

"Anschluss" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
[...More...]

"World War II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

War Crimes
A war crime is an act that constitutes a serious violation of the laws of war that gives rise to individual criminal responsibility.[1] Examples of war crimes include intentionally killing civilians or prisoners, torture, destroying civilian property, taking hostages, perfidy, rape, using child soldiers, pillaging, declaring that no quarter will be given, and serious violations of the principles of distinction and proportionality, such as strategic bombing of civilian populations.[2] The concept of war crimes emerged at the turn of the twentieth century when the body of customary international law applicable to warfare between sovereign states was codified. Such codification occurred at the national level, such as with the publication of the Lieber Code in the United States, and at the international level with the adoption of the treaties during the Hague Conventions of 1899 and 1907
[...More...]

"War Crimes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Le Paradis Massacre
Coordinates: 50°35′22″N 2°38′26″E / 50.58944°N 2.64056°E / 50.58944; 2.64056Le Paradis MassacreLocation Le Paradis village, commune of Lestrem, Northern FranceDate 27 May 1940Target 2nd Battalion Royal Norfolk RegimentAttack typeMass execution of prisoners-of-warDeaths 97Non-fatal injuries2Perpetrators 14th Company, 3rd SS Division Totenkopf SS Hauptsturmführer Fritz KnöchleinThe Le Paradis massacre was a war crime committed by members of the 14th Company, SS Division Totenkopf, under the command of Hauptsturmführer Fritz Knöchlein. It took place on 27 May 1940, during the Battle of France, at a time when the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) was attempting to retreat through the Pas-de-Calais region during the Battle of Dunkirk. Soldiers of the 2nd Battalion, the Royal Norfolk Regiment, had become isolated from their regiment
[...More...]

"Le Paradis Massacre" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fall Of France
 France French colonial empire Belgium  United Kingdom  Canada  Netherlands  Luxembourg Poland CzechoslovakiaCommanders and leaders Walther von Brauchitsch Gerd von Rundstedt Fedor von Bock Wilhelm von Leeb Albert Kesselring Hugo Sperrle Heinz Guderian Umberto di Savoia Maurice Gamelin
Maurice Gamelin
(until 17 May) Alphonse Georges
[...More...]

"Fall Of France" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Operation Barbarossa
Frontline strength (initial)3.8 million personnel[1][2] 3,350–3,795 tanks[3][1][4][5] 3,030–3,072 other AFVs[6][7] 2,770–5,369 aircraft[3][8] 7,200–23,435 artillery pieces[1][3][5] 17,081 mortars[5]Frontline strength (initial)2.6–2.9 million personnel[9][10][11] 11,000 tanks[12][13] 7,133–9,100 military aircraft[14][15][16]Casualties and lossesTotal military casualties: 1,000,000+BreakdownCasualties of 1941:According to German Army medical reports (including Army Norway):[17]186,452 killed 40,157 missing 655,179 wounded in action[a] 8,000 evacuated sick2,827 aircraft destroyed[18] 2,735 tanks destroyed[4][19] 104 assault guns destroyed[4][19]Other involved country losses 114,000+ casualties (at least 39,000 dead or missing)[b] 8,700 casualties[c] 5,000+ casualties[d]Total military casualties: 4,973,820BreakdownCasualties of 1941:Based on Soviet archives:[21]
[...More...]

"Operation Barbarossa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Einsatzkommando
During World War II, the Nazi German
Nazi German
Einsatzkommandos were a sub-group of five Einsatzgruppen
Einsatzgruppen
mobile killing squads (term used by Holocaust historians) – up to 3,000 men total – usually composed of 500–1,000 functionaries of the SS and Gestapo, whose mission was to exterminate Jews, Polish intellectuals, Romani, homosexuals, communists and the NKVD
NKVD
collaborators in the captured territories often far behind the advancing German front.[1][2] After the outbreak of war with the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
with Operation Barbarossa, the Red Army began to retreat so rapidly that the large Einsatzgruppen
Einsatzgruppen
had to be split into dozens of smaller commandos (Einsatzkommandos), responsible for systematically killing Jews and, among others, alleged Soviet partisans behind the Wehrmacht
Wehrmacht
lines
[...More...]

"Einsatzkommando" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Berlin
Berlin
Berlin
(/bɜːrˈlɪn/, German: [bɛɐ̯ˈliːn] ( listen)) is the capital and the largest city of Germany, as well as one of its 16 constituent states. With a steadily growing population of approximately 3.7 million,[4] Berlin
Berlin
is the second most populous city proper in the European Union
European Union
behind London
London
and the seventh most populous urban area in the European Union.[5] Located in northeastern Germany
Germany
on the banks of the rivers Spree
Spree
and Havel, it is the centre of the Berlin- Brandenburg
Brandenburg
Metropolitan Region, which has roughly 6 million residents from more than 180 nations.[6][7][8][9] Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin
Berlin
is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate
[...More...]

"Berlin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oranienburg
Oranienburg
Oranienburg
is a town in Brandenburg, Germany. It is the capital of the district of Oberhavel.Contents1 Geography1.1 Division of the town2 History 3 International relations 4 Public institutions 5 See also 6 Demography6.1 Sons and daughters of the city7 Footnotes 8 External linksGeography[edit] Oranienburg
Oranienburg
is a town located on the banks of the Havel
Havel
river, 35 km north of the centre of Berlin. Division of the town[edit] Oranienburg
Oranienburg
consists of 9 districtsFriedrichsthal Germendorf Lehnitz Malz Oranienburg Sachsenhausen Schmachtenhagen Wensickendorf ZehlendorfHistory[edit] Originally named Bötzow, the town of Oranienburg
Oranienburg
dates from the 12th century and was first mentioned in 1216. Margrave Albert the Bear (ruled 1157-1170) allegedly ordered the construction of a castle on the banks of the Havel
[...More...]

"Oranienburg" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Occupied Europe
German-occupied Europe
Europe
refers to the sovereign countries of Europe which were occupied by the military forces of Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
at various times between 1939 and 1945 and administered by the Nazi regimes.[1]Contents1 Background 2 Occupied countries2.1 Governments in exile2.1.1 Allied governments in exile 2.1.2 Axis governments in exile 2.1.3 Neutral governments in exile3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksBackground[edit] Several German occupied countries entered World War II
World War II
as Allies of the United Kingdom[2] or the Soviet Union.[3] Some were forced to surrender before outbreak of the war such as Czechoslovakia;[4] others like Poland
Poland
(invaded on 1 September 1939)[1] were conquered in battle and then occupied
[...More...]

"Occupied Europe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sturmabteilung
The Sturmabteilung
Sturmabteilung
(SA; German pronunciation: [ˈʃtʊɐ̯mʔapˌtaɪlʊŋ] ( listen)), literally Storm Detachment, functioned as the original paramilitary wing of the Nazi Party (NSDAP). It played a significant role in Adolf Hitler's rise to power in the 1920s and 1930s
[...More...]

"Sturmabteilung" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
[...More...]

"Germany" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Night Of The Long Knives
The Night of the Long Knives
Night of the Long Knives
(German:  Nacht der langen Messer (help·info)), also called Operation Hummingbird (German: Unternehmen Kolibri) or, in Germany, the Röhm Putsch[a] (German spelling: Röhm-Putsch), was a purge that took place in Nazi Germany from June 30 to July 2, 1934, when the National Socialist German Workers Party, or Nazis, carried out a series of political extrajudicial executions intended to consolidate Adolf Hitler's absolute hold on power in Germany. Many of those killed were leaders of the Sturmabteilung
Sturmabteilung
(SA), the Nazis' own paramilitary organization, colloquially known as the "Brownshirts" due to the color of their uniforms. The best-known victim of the purge was Ernst Röhm, the SA's leader and one of Hitler's longtime supporters and allies
[...More...]

"Night Of The Long Knives" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Slow-scan Television
Slow Scan television (SSTV) is a picture transmission method used mainly by amateur radio operators, to transmit and receive static pictures via radio in monochrome or color. A literal term for SSTV is narrowband television. Analog broadcast television requires at least 6 MHz wide channels, because it transmits 25 or 30 picture frames per second (in the NTSC, PAL
PAL
or SECAM
SECAM
color systems), but SSTV usually only takes up to a maximum of 3 kHz of bandwidth
[...More...]

"Slow-scan Television" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.