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Toronto Islands
The Toronto
Toronto
Islands (formerly known as Island of Hiawatha
Hiawatha
and also known as Menecing, meaning "On the Island" in the Ojibwa language)[1][2] are a chain of small islands in Lake Ontario, south of mainland Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Comprising the only group of islands in the western part of Lake Ontario, the Toronto
Toronto
Islands are located just offshore from the city centre, and provide shelter for Toronto
Toronto
Harbour. The islands are home to parkland, the Billy Bishop Toronto
Toronto
City Airport, several yacht clubs, Centreville Amusement Park, and Hanlan's Beach. The island community is considered to be the largest urban car-free community in North America, although some service vehicles are permitted
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Han Dong (politician)
Han Dong (born c. 1977) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. He is a Liberal member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario
Ontario
who was elected in 2014. He represents the riding of Trinity—Spadina.Contents1 Background 2 Politics 3 References 4 External linksBackground[edit] Dong was born in Shanghai, China. He moved to Toronto
Toronto
with his family when he was 13 and they settled in the Parkdale area of Toronto.[1] He lives in Toronto
Toronto
with his wife Sophie and their two children.[2] Dong worked as marketing director of Chianti Foods and then with the non-profit Canada
Canada
Shanghai
Shanghai
Business Association
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Nursery School
A preschool, also known as nursery school, pre-primary school, playschool or kindergarten, is an educational establishment or learning space offering early childhood education to children before they begin compulsory education at primary school. It may be publicly or privately operated, and may be subsidized from public funds.Contents1 Terminology 2 History2.1 Origins 2.2 Spread3 Developmental areas 4 Funding 5 Advocacy 6 Curricula 7 National variations7.1 China 7.2 Turkey 7.3 Japan 7.4 North Korea 7.5 United States7.5.1 Head Start7.6 United Kingdom7.6.1 England 7.6.2 Wales 7.6.3 Northern Ireland 7.6.4 Scotland7.7 Ireland8 See also 9 References 10 Sources 11 Further reading 12 External linksTerminology[edit] Terminology varies by country
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Dragon Boat
A dragon boat is a human-powered watercraft. They were traditionally made in the Pearl River Delta
Pearl River Delta
region of China's southern Guangdong Province out of teak wood (mostly imported from Pontianak, Indonesia) to various designs and sizes. In other parts of China, different kinds of wood are used to build these traditional watercraft. It is one of a family of traditional paddled long boats found throughout Asia, Africa, the Pacific islands and also Puerto Rico. Currently, boats are being made for competitive purposes out of carbon fiber and other lightweight materials. Dragon boats are the basis of the team paddling sport of dragon boat racing, a watersport which has its roots in an ancient folk ritual of contending villagers, which has been held for over 2000 years throughout southern China
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Nude Beach
A nude beach, sometimes called a clothing-optional or free beach, is a beach where users are at liberty to be nude. Nude beaches usually have mixed bathing. Such beaches are usually on public lands, and any member of the public is allowed to use the facilities without membership in any movement or subscription to any personal belief. The use of the beach facilities is normally anonymous. Unlike a naturist resort or facility, there is normally no membership or vetting requirement for the use of a nude beach. The use of nude beach facilities is usually casual, not requiring pre-booking. Nude beaches may be official (legally sanctioned), unofficial (tolerated by residents and law enforcement), or illegal. However, nude beaches are relatively few and are usually at some distance from cities, and access is at times more difficult than at a regular beach and the facilities at these beaches tend to be very basic with a few notable exceptions
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Public School (government Funded)
State schools (also known as public schools outside England
England
and Wales[note 1]) are generally primary or secondary schools mandated for or offered to all children without charge, funded in whole or in part by taxation. These schools are generally inclusive (non-selective) in admitting all students within the geographical area that they serve. While state schools are to be found in virtually every country, there are significant variations in their structure and educational programs. State education generally encompasses primary and secondary education (kindergarten to twelfth grade, or equivalent), as well as post-secondary educational institutions such as universities, colleges, and technical schools that are funded and overseen by government rather than private entities. The education system, or lack thereof, prior to the establishment of government-funded schools impacts their role in each society
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Disc Golf
Disc golf[2] (also called Frisbee
Frisbee
Golf[3] or sometimes Frolf[4]) is a flying disc sport in which players throw a disc at a target, and is played using rules similar to golf.[5] It is often played on a course of 9 or 18 holes, but other formats are common. Players complete a hole by throwing a disc from a tee area toward a target, throwing again from the landing position of the disc until the target is reached
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Miniature Railway
A ridable miniature railway (US: 'riding railroad' or grand scale railroad) is a ground-level, large scale model railway that hauls passengers using locomotives that are models of full-sized railway locomotives (powered by diesel or petrol engines, live steam engines or electric motors).Contents1 Overview 2 Distinction between a ridable miniature railway and a minimum-gauge railway 3 Miniature railways 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksOverview[edit] Typically miniature railways have a rail track gauge between 5 in (127 mm) and 18 in (457 mm), though both larger and smaller gauges are used. These large model railroads are most often seen in urban parks or in commercial settings, such as amusement park rides. At gauges of 5 in (127 mm) and less, the track is commonly raised above ground level. Flat cars are arranged with foot boards so that driver and passengers sit astride the track
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Fort York
Fort York
Fort York
is a historic site of military fortifications and related buildings on the west side of downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The fort was built by the British Army
British Army
and Canadian militia troops in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, to defend the settlement and the new capital of the Upper Canada
Canada
region from the threat of a military attack, principally from the newly independent United States
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Shoal
In oceanography, geomorphology, and earth sciences, a shoal is a natural submerged ridge, bank, or bar that consists of, or is covered by, sand or other unconsolidated material, and rises from the bed of a body of water to near the surface. Often it refers to those submerged ridges, banks, or bars that rise near enough to the surface of a body of water as to constitute a danger to navigation. Shoals are also known as sandbanks, sandbars, or gravelbars. Two or more shoals that are either separated by shared troughs or interconnected by past and/or present sedimentary and hydrographic processes are referred to as a shoal complex.[1][2] The term shoal is also used in a number of ways that can be either similar or quite different from how it is used in the geologic, geomorphic, and oceanographic literature
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Sixth Grade
Sixth grade (called P7 in Scotland and Year 7 elsewhere in the UK)in Australia
Australia
it is year 5 is a year of education. In many nations, it is the first year of middle school or the last year of primary level (elementary). It is for students ages 11–12
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Alluvial Deposit
Alluvium
Alluvium
(from the Latin
Latin
alluvius, from alluere, "to wash against") is loose, unconsolidated (not cemented together into a solid rock) soil or sediments, which has been eroded, reshaped by water in some form, and redeposited in a non-marine setting.[1][2] Alluvium
Alluvium
is typically made up of a variety of materials, including fine particles of silt and clay and larger particles of sand and gravel. When this loose alluvial material is deposited or cemented into a lithological unit, or lithified, it is called an alluvial deposit.[3]Contents1 Definitions 2 Age 3 Ores 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDefinitions[edit] The term "alluvium" is not typically used in situations where the formation of the sediment can clearly be attributed to another geologic process that is well described
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Sand Spit
A spit or sandspit is a deposition bar or beach landform off coasts or lake shores. It develops in places where re-entrance occurs, such as at a cove's headlands, by the process of longshore drift by longshore currents. The drift occurs due to waves meeting the beach at an oblique angle, moving sediment down the beach in a zigzag pattern. This is complemented by longshore currents, which further transport sediment through the water alongside the beach. These currents are caused by the same waves that cause the drift.[1]Contents1 Hydrology and geology 2 Notable spits around the world 3 Human settlement patterns 4 See also 5 ReferencesHydrology and geology[edit] Where the direction of the shore inland re-enters, or changes direction, for example at a headland, the longshore current spreads out or dissipates. No longer able to carry the full load, much of the sediment is dropped. This is called deposition
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Peninsula
A peninsula (Latin: paeninsula from paene "almost” and insula "island") is a piece of land surrounded by water on the majority of its border, while being connected to a mainland from which it extends. Examples are the Upper and Lower peninsulas of the U.S. state of Michigan, the Scandinavian Peninsula
Scandinavian Peninsula
and the Malay peninsula.[1][2][3][4] The surrounding water is usually understood to be continuous, though not necessarily named as a single body of water. Peninsulas are not always named as such; one can also be a headland, cape, island promontory, bill, point, or spit.[5] A point is generally considered a tapering piece of land projecting into a body of water that is less prominent than a cape.[6] A river which courses through a very tight meander is also sometimes said to form a "peninsula" within the (almost closed) loop of water
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MV Hiawatha
The Hiawatha
Hiawatha
is a passenger ferry built in 1895 for the Royal Canadian Yacht Club, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.[1][3] She is 56 feet (17 m) long, 13.3 feet (4.1 m) wide, has a depth of 6.3 feet (1.9 m), and measures 46 gross tons. Her capacity is 100 passengers.[2] She was built by the Bertram Engine Works near Queen's Wharf and named for First Nation leader and co-founder of the Iroquois confederacy Hiawatha. The Hiawatha
Hiawatha
is claimed to be the oldest passenger vessel still in active service on the North American Great Lakes. The Hiawatha
Hiawatha
has served as a ferry for the yacht club since 1895
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Jay Ferguson (Canadian Musician)
Jay Ferguson (born October 14, 1968) is a member of the Canadian rock band Sloan. He is the only member in Sloan who comes from Halifax, Nova Scotia. When he was twelve years old, he was given a job at a secondhand record store by George Zimmerman. Before Sloan, he was in a band with Chris Murphy called Kearney Lake Road. In 1991 Ferguson and Murphy started Sloan along with Patrick Pentland
Patrick Pentland
and Andrew Scott. Ferguson plays rhythm guitar and occasionally bass and drums. Some of his more famous songwriting contributions are "I Hate My Generation" from the album Twice Removed, "The Lines You Amend" from One Chord to Another, "Who Taught You to Live Like That?" from the album Never Hear the End of It, and "Witch's Wand" from the album Parallel Play. In December 2005 Ferguson began hosting a show on CBC Radio 3
CBC Radio 3
with Sloan bandmate Chris Murphy
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