HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Toponymy Of Great Britain
Britain and Ireland
Ireland
have a very varied toponymy due the different settlement patterns, political and linguistic histories. In addition to the old and modern varieties of English, Scottish and Irish Gaelic and Welsh, many other languages and cultures have influenced geographical names including Anglo-Normans, Anglo Saxons, Romans and Vikings
[...More...]

"Toponymy Of Great Britain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Great Britain
Great Britain, also known as Britain, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
off the northwest coast of continental Europe. With an area of 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), Great Britain
Great Britain
is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world.[5][note 1] In 2011 the island had a population of about 61 million people, making it the world's third-most populous island after Java
Java
in Indonesia and Honshu
Honshu
in Japan.[7][8] The island of Ireland
Ireland
is situated to the west of it, and together these islands, along with over 1,000 smaller surrounding islands, form the British Isles
British Isles
archipelago.[9] The island is dominated by a maritime climate with quite narrow temperature differences between seasons
[...More...]

"Great Britain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen); Ulster-Scots: Airlann [ˈɑːrlən]) is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain
Great Britain
to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland
Ireland
is the third-largest island in Europe. Politically, Ireland
Ireland
is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. In 2011, the population of Ireland
Ireland
was about 6.6 million, ranking it the second-most populous island in Europe
Europe
after Great Britain
[...More...]

"Ireland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Toponymy
Toponymy is the study of place names (toponyms), their origins, meanings, use, and typology.Contents1 Etymology 2 Meaning and history 3 Issues 4 Noted toponymists 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The word "toponymy" is derived from the Greek words tópos (τόπος) "place" and ónoma (ὄνομα) "name". Toponymy is itself a branch of onomastics, the study of names of all kinds. Meaning and history[edit] Toponym is the general name for any place or geographical entity.[1] Related, more specific types of toponym include hydronym for a body of water and oronym for a mountain or hill
[...More...]

"Toponymy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Celtic Languages
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordi
[...More...]

"Celtic Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

North Germanic Languages
Insular Scandinavian languages:   Faroese   Icelandic   Norn (†)    Greenlandic Norse
Greenlandic Norse
(†)Extinct Norn was spoken in Orkney, Shetland
Shetland
and Caithness
Caithness
in what is now Scotland
Scotland
until the 19th century. Extinct Greenlandic Norse
Greenlandic Norse
was spoken in the Norse settlements of Greenland
Greenland
until their demise in the late 15th century.The North Germanic languages
Germanic languages
make up one of the three branches of the Germanic languages, a sub-family of the Indo-European languages, along with the West Germanic languages
Germanic languages
and the extinct East Germanic languages
[...More...]

"North Germanic Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

West Germanic Languages
The West Germanic languages
Germanic languages
constitute the largest of the three branches of the Germanic family of languages (the others being the North Germanic and the extinct East Germanic languages). The four most prevalent West Germanic languages
Germanic languages
are Afrikaans, English, German, and Dutch. The family also includes other High and Low German
Low German
languages including Yiddish, in addition to other Franconian languages, like Luxembourgish
Luxembourgish
and Ingvaeonic languages
Ingvaeonic languages
next to English, such as the Frisian languages
Frisian languages
and Scots
[...More...]

"West Germanic Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Italic Languages
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordi
[...More...]

"Italic Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Romance Languages
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordi
[...More...]

"Romance Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Indo-European Language Family
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordi
[...More...]

"Indo-European Language Family" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pre-Indo-European Languages
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker U
[...More...]

"Pre-Indo-European Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

English Toponymy
The toponymy of England, like the English language
English language
itself, derives from various linguistic origins. Modern interpretations are apt to be inexact: many English toponyms have been corrupted and broken down over the years, due to changes in language and culture which have caused the original meaning to be lost. In some cases, words used in placenames are derived from languages that are extinct, and of which there are no extant known definitions; or placenames may be compounds between two or more languages from different periods. Many names predate the radical changes in the English language
English language
triggered by the Norman Conquest, and some predate the arrival of the Anglo-Saxons. Placenames typically have meanings which were significant to the settlers of a locality (not necessarily the first settlers)
[...More...]

"English Toponymy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Irish Toponymy
The vast majority of placenames in Ireland
Ireland
are anglicisations of Irish language names; that is, adaptations of the Irish names to English phonology and spelling. However, some names come directly from the English language, and a handful come from Old Norse
Old Norse
and Scots. The study of placenames in Ireland
Ireland
unveils features of the country's history and geography, and the development of the Irish language. The name of Ireland
Ireland
itself comes from the Irish name Éire, added to the Germanic word land. In mythology, Éire
Éire
was an Irish goddess of the land and of sovereignty (see Ériu). In some cases, the official English or anglicised name is wholly different from the official Irish language
Irish language
name
[...More...]

"Irish Toponymy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Scottish Toponymy
Scottish toponymy derives from the languages of Scotland
[...More...]

"Scottish Toponymy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Welsh Toponymy
The placenames of Wales
Wales
derive in most cases from the Welsh language, but have also been influenced by linguistic contact with the Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Vikings, Anglo-Normans
Anglo-Normans
and modern English.[1] The study of placenames (or toponymy) in Wales
Wales
reveals significant features of the country's history and geography as well of the development of the Welsh language
[...More...]

"Welsh Toponymy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.