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Tony Benn
Anthony Neil Wedgwood Benn (3 April 1925 – 14 March 2014), originally known as Anthony Wedgwood Benn, but later as Tony Benn, was a British politician, writer, and diarist. He was a Member of Parliament (MP) for 47 years between the 1950 and 2001 general elections and a Cabinet minister in the Labour governments of Harold Wilson and James Callaghan
James Callaghan
in the 1960s and 1970s. Originally a moderate, he was identified as being on the party's hard left from the early 1980s, and was widely seen as a key proponent of democratic socialism within the party.[1] Benn inherited a peerage on his father's death (as 2nd Viscount Stansgate), which prevented his continuing as an MP. He fought to remain in the House of Commons,[2] and then campaigned for the ability to renounce the title, a campaign which succeeded with the Peerage Act 1963
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Anthony Benn (Recorder Of London)
Sir Anthony Benn (c. 1568–1618) was a barrister, appointed recorder for the town of Kingston upon Thames
Kingston upon Thames
in 1610, knighted in 1615 and appointed Recorder of London
Recorder of London
in 1616 shortly before his death in 1618.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career2.1 Essays3 Family 4 Death 5 Survivors 6 Notes 7 See also 8 ReferencesEarly life and education[edit] Benn was the first son of Robert Benn, a linen draper of St Nicholas Cole Abbey, London.[1] He had a sister, Anne, who married Edward Goodwyn of Dorking.[2] He matriculated at Broadgates Hall, Oxford, in January 1584, enrolled at the Middle Temple
Middle Temple
in 1583, and took Batchelor of Arts at Oxford in 1587.[1] [3] Career[edit] Benn was called to the bar in 1594, practising in Chancery
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Member Of Parliament (United Kingdom)
A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the voters to a parliament. In many countries with bicameral parliaments, this category includes specifically members of the lower house, as upper houses often have a different title
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United Kingdom General Election, 2001
Tony Blair LabourAppointed Prime Minister Tony Blair Labour1992 election MPs1997 election MPs2001 election MPs2005 election MPs2010 election MPsSeats won in the election (outer ring) against number of votes (inner ring).The 2001 United Kingdom
United Kingdom
general election was held on Thursday 7 June 2001, four years after the previous election on 1 May 1997, to elect 659 members to the British House of Commons. Under the leadership of Tony Blair, the governing Labour Party was re-elected to serve a second term in government with another landslide victory, returning 413 of the 418 seats won by the party in the previous general election, a net loss of 5 seats, though with significantly lower turnout than before—59.4%, compared to 71.3% in the previous election. Tony Blair
Tony Blair
went on to become the first Labour Prime Minister to serve a consecutive full term in office
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Member Of Parliament
A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the voters to a parliament. In many countries with bicameral parliaments, this category includes specifically members of the lower house, as upper houses often have a different title
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Pilot Officer
Pilot officer
Pilot officer
(Plt Off officially in the RAF; PLTOFF in the RAAF
RAAF
and RNZAF; formerly P/O in all services, and still often used in the RAF) is the lowest commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force[1] and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. It ranks immediately below flying officer. It has a NATO
NATO
ranking code of OF-1 and is equivalent to a second lieutenant in the British Army
British Army
or the Royal Marines. The Royal Navy has no exactly equivalent rank, and a pilot officer is senior to a Royal Navy
Royal Navy
midshipman and junior to a Royal Navy
Royal Navy
sub-lieutenant
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Royal Air Force
The Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(RAF) is the United Kingdom's aerial warfare force. Formed towards the end of the First World War
First World War
on 1 April 1918,[2] it is the oldest independent air force in the world.[3] Following victory over the Central Powers
Central Powers
in 1918 the RAF emerged as, at the time, the largest air force in the world.[4] Since its formation, the RAF has taken a significant role in British military history
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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Marylebone
Marylebone
Marylebone
(/ˈmærɪləbən/ or /ˈmærələbən/[1], both appropriate for the Parish Church of St. Marylebone, /ˈmærɪbən/, /ˈmɑːrlɪbən/, or /ˈmærɪlɪboʊn/[2]) is an affluent inner-city area of central London, England, located within the City of Westminster
Westminster
and part of the West End
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Lords Temporal
In the Parliament of the United Kingdom, the Lords Temporal
Lords Temporal
are secular members of the House of Lords. The term is used to differentiate these members—who are either life peers or hereditary peers, although the hereditary right to sit in the House of Lords
House of Lords
was abolished for all but ninety-two peers in 1999—from the Lords Spiritual, who sit in the House as a consequence of being bishops in the Church of England. Before the enactment of the House of Lords
House of Lords
Act 1999, all peers were (potentially) members of the House of Lords, and all were Lords Temporal in this sense. Membership of the Lords is now limited to life peers and a number of elected hereditary peers. The Lords Temporal
Lords Temporal
are all members of the Peerage. Formerly, they were all hereditary peers
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Members Of The House Of Lords
This is a list of members of the House of Lords, the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.Contents1 Current sitting members1.1 Lords Spiritual 1.2 Lords Temporal2 Current non-sitting members2.1 Peers on leave of absence 2.2 Peers temporarily disqualified3 Recently deceased 4 Ceased to be members4.1 Resigned 4.2 Removed for non-attendance 4.3 Permanently disqualified5 See also 6 References 7 External linksCurrent sitting members[edit]Current composition of the House of LordsGroupSitting membersConservative Party 245Labour Party 191Crossbench 181Liberal Democrats 98Non-affiliated 29Democratic Unionist Party 3UK Independence Party 3Ulster Unionist Party 2Green Party 1Plaid Cymru


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The Right Honourable
The Right Honourable (The Rt Hon. or Rt Hon.) is an honorific style traditionally applied to certain persons and to certain collective bodies in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, India, some other Commonwealth realms, the Anglophone Caribbean, Mauritius, and occasionally elsewhere
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Boundary Commissions (United Kingdom)
The boundary commissions in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
are non-departmental public bodies responsible for determining the boundaries of constituencies for elections to the House of Commons, the Scottish Parliament and the National Assembly for Wales.[1] There are four separate boundary commissions:Boundary Commission for England Boundary Commission for Scotland Boundary Commission for Wales (Welsh: Comisiwn Ffiniau i Gymru) Boundary Commission for Northern IrelandEach commission comprises four members, three of whom take part in meetings. The Speaker of the House of Commons is ex officio chairman of each of the boundary commissions
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Hard Left
Hard left is a term used—often pejoratively—to refer to political movements and ideas outside the mainstream centre-left.[1] The term has been used more formally in the United Kingdom in the context of debates within both the Labour Party and the broader left in the 1980s to describe Trotskyist groups such as the Militant tendency, Socialist Organiser and Socialist Action.[2] Within the party, the "hard left", represented by the Campaign Group, subscribed to more strongly socialist views while the "soft left", associated for example with the Tribune Group, embraced more moderate social democratic ideas.[3][4] Politicians commonly described as being on the hard left of the Labour Party at the time included Derek Hatton, Ken Livingstone,[5] Dennis Skinner[6] and Eric Heffer.[7] The term has been used since then by Labour's political opponents, for e
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