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Tokugawa Ieyasu
Illegitimate:Yūki Hideyasu Toku-hime Tokugawa Hidetada Matsudaira Tadayoshi Takeda Nobuyoshi Matsudaira Tadateru Matsudaira Matsuchiyo Matsudaira Senchiyo Tokugawa Yoshinao Tokugawa Yorinobu Tokugawa Yorifusa Furihime Matsuhime IchihimeAmong others...ParentsMatsudaira Hirotada Odai-no-kataThe Tokugawa clan
Tokugawa clan
crest Tokugawa Ieyasu
Tokugawa Ieyasu
(徳川 家康, January 31, 1543 – June 1, 1616) was the founder and first shōgun of the Tokugawa shogunate
Tokugawa shogunate
of Japan, which effectively ruled Japan
Japan
from the Battle of Sekigahara
Battle of Sekigahara
in 1600 until the Meiji Restoration
Meiji Restoration
in 1868. Ieyasu seized power in 1600, received appointment as shōgun in 1603, and abdicated from office in 1605, but remained in power until his death in 1616
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Japanese Name
Japanese names (日本人の氏名, Nihonjin no Shimei) in modern times usually consist of a family name (surname), followed by a given name. More than one given name is not generally used. Japanese names are usually written in kanji, which are characters usually Chinese in origin but Japanese in pronunciation
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Muromachi Period
The Muromachi period
Muromachi period
(室町時代, Muromachi jidai, also known as the Muromachi era, the Ashikaga era, or the Ashikaga period) is a division of Japanese history running from approximately 1336 to 1573. The period marks the governance of the Muromachi or Ashikaga shogunate (Muromachi bakufu or Ashikaga bakufu), which was officially established in 1338 by the first Muromachi shōgun, Ashikaga Takauji, two years after the brief Kenmu Restoration
Kenmu Restoration
(1333–36) of imperial rule was brought to a close
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Kana
Kana
Kana
(仮名) are syllabic Japanese scripts, a part of the Japanese writing system contrasted with the logographic Chinese characters known in Japan
Japan
as kanji (漢字). There are three kana scripts: modern cursive hiragana (ひらがな);[2] modern angular katakana (カタカナ); and the old syllabic use of kanji known as man'yōgana (万葉仮名) that was ancestral to both. Hentaigana
Hentaigana
(変体仮名, "variant kana") are historical variants of modern standard hiragana. In modern Japanese, hiragana and katakana have directly corresponding character sets (different sets of characters representing the same sounds). Katakana
Katakana
with a few additions is also used to write Ainu
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Meiji Restoration
The Meiji Restoration
Meiji Restoration
(明治維新, Meiji Ishin), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Renovation, Revolution, Reform, or Renewal, was an event that restored practical imperial rule to the Empire of Japan
Empire of Japan
in 1868 under Emperor Meiji. Although there were ruling Emperors before the Meiji Restoration, the events restored practical abilities and consolidated the political system under the Emperor of Japan.[2] The goals of the restored government were expressed by the new Emperor in the Charter Oath
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Aichi Prefecture
Aichi Prefecture
Aichi Prefecture
(愛知県, Aichi-ken) is a prefecture of Japan located in the Chūbu region.[1] The region of Aichi is also known as the Tōkai region. The capital is Nagoya
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Tōkaidō (road)
The Tōkaidō road (東海道) was the most important of the Five Routes of the Edo period
Edo period
in Japan, connecting Kyoto
Kyoto
to Edo
Edo
(modern-day Tokyo). Unlike the inland and less heavily travelled Nakasendō, the Tōkaidō travelled along the sea coast of eastern Honshū, hence the route's name.[2]Contents1 Travelling the Tōkaidō 2 The Tōkaidō in art and literature 3 Ōsaka Kaidō 4 Modern-day Tōkaidō 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksTravelling the Tōkaidō[edit] The standard method of travel was by foot, as wheeled carts were almost nonexistent and heavy cargo was usually sent by boat. Members of the higher class, however, travelled by kago. Women were forbidden to travel alone and had to be accompanied by men
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Kyoto
Kyoto
Kyoto
(京都市, Kyōto-shi, pronounced [kʲoːꜜto] ( listen), pronounced [kʲoːtoꜜɕi] ( listen); UK: /kɪˈoʊtoʊ/, US: /kiˈoʊ-/, or /ˈkjoʊ-/[4]) is a city located in the central part of the island of Honshu, Japan. It has a population close to 1.5 million
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He (kana)
へ, in hiragana, or ヘ in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, which represents one mora. The two ways of writing this mora are almost identical. Each is written in one stroke and represents [he]. The [he] sound is the only sound that is written identically in hiragana and katakana
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Japanese Calendar
Japanese calendar
Japanese calendar
types have included a range of official and unofficial systems. At present, Japan uses the Gregorian calendar together with year designations stating the year of the reign of the current Emperor.[1]Contents1 History 2 Official calendar2.1 Years 2.2 Seasons 2.3 Months 2.4 Subdivisions of the month 2.5 Days of the month 2.6 National holidays2.6.1 Timeline of changes to national holidays3 Customary issues in modern Japan3.1 Gregorian months and the "One-Month Delay" 3.2 Seasonal days3.2.1 The 24 sekki 3.2.2 Zassetsu3.3 Seasonal festivals 3.4 Rokuyō 3.5 April 14 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The lunisolar Chinese calendar
Chinese calendar
was introduced to Japan via Korea
Korea
in the middle of the sixth century
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Imagawa Clan
Imagawa clan
Imagawa clan
(今川氏, Imagawa-uji) was a Japanese noble military clan that claimed descent from the Seiwa Genji
Seiwa Genji
by way of the Kawachi Genji
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Tokugawa (surname)
Tokugawa ( Shinjitai
Shinjitai
(modern Japanese) spelling: 徳川; Kyūjitai (historical Japanese) spelling: 德川) is a surname in Japan. It originated with Tokugawa Ieyasu, who took the surname in 1567, reviving an ancestral placename. He and his fourteen successors were shōguns during the Edo period
Edo period
of Japanese history. Some of his sons also bore the Tokugawa surname, and three cadet branches of his line, the Owari, Kii, and Mito Tokugawa, continued as daimyōs through the Edo period. Descendants of Ieyasu who were not permitted to take the Tokugawa name normally bore the Matsudaira
Matsudaira
surname. See also[edit]Tokugawa clan Category:Tokugawa clanThis surname-related article is a stub
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Mikawa Province
Mikawa Province
Mikawa Province
(三河国, Mikawa no kuni) was an old province in the area that today forms the eastern half of Aichi Prefecture.[1] Its abbreviated form name was Sanshū (三州 or 参州). Mikawa bordered on Owari, Mino, Shinano, and Tōtōmi Provinces. Hiroshige
Hiroshige
ukiyo-e "Mikawa" in "The Famous Scenes of the Sixty States" (六十余州名所図会), depicting the mountainous scenery around the temple of Hokai-ji, a popular pilgrimage destination in MikawaMikawa is classified as one of the provinces of the Tōkaidō
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Mizuno Tadamasa
Mizuno Tadamasa (水野 忠政) (1493 – August 22, 1543) was a samurai lord of the Mizuno clan
Mizuno clan
of feudal Japan. He ruled Kariya Castle. He was also the father of Dai-no-kata, the mother of shōgun Tokugawa Ieyasu.This article about samurai or samurai-related topic is a stub
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Daimyō
The daimyō (大名, IPA: [daimʲoː] ( listen)) were powerful Japanese feudal lords[1] who, until their decline in the early Meiji period, ruled most of Japan from their vast, hereditary land holdings. In the term, dai (大) means "large", and myō stands for myōden (名田), meaning private land.[2] Subordinate only to the shōgun, daimyōs were the most powerful feudal rulers from the 10th century to the middle 19th century in Japan. From the Shugo of the Muromachi period
Muromachi period
through the Sengoku to the daimyōs of the Edo
Edo
period, the rank had a long and varied history
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Tokugawa Yorinobu
Tokugawa may refer to: History[edit] Tokugawa shogunate, a feudal regime of Japan Tokugawa clan, a powerful family of Japan Tokugawa Ieyasu
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