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Todd-AO
Todd-AO
Todd-AO
is an American post-production company founded in 1953, providing sound-related services to the motion picture and television industries. The company operates three facilities in the Los Angeles area. Todd-AO
Todd-AO
is also the name of the widescreen, 70 mm film format that was developed by Mike Todd
Mike Todd
and the American Optical Company in the mid-1950s. Todd-AO
Todd-AO
had been founded to promote and distribute this system.Contents1 History1.1 Todd-AO
Todd-AO
process 1.2 Curved screen vs
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Post-production
Post-production
Post-production
is part of the process of filmmaking, video production, and photography
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Oscar Hammerstein II
Oscar Greeley Clendenning Hammerstein II (/ˈhæmərstaɪn/; July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was an American librettist, theatrical producer, and (usually uncredited) theatre director of musicals for almost forty years. Hammerstein won eight Tony Awards and two Academy Awards for Best Original Song. Many of his songs are standard repertoire for vocalists and jazz musicians. He co-wrote 850 songs. Hammerstein was the lyricist and playwright in his partnerships; his collaborators wrote the music. Hammerstein collaborated with numerous composers, such as Jerome Kern, with whom he wrote Show Boat, Vincent Youmans, Rudolf Friml, Richard A. Whiting
Richard A

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Dune (film)
Dune
Dune
is a 1984 American epic science fiction film written and directed by David Lynch, based on the 1965 Frank Herbert
Frank Herbert
novel of the same name. The film stars Kyle MacLachlan
Kyle MacLachlan
as young nobleman Paul Atreides, and includes an ensemble of well-known American and European actors in supporting roles. It was filmed at the Churubusco Studios in Mexico City and included a soundtrack by the rock band Toto, as well as Brian Eno. Set in the distant future, the film chronicles the conflict between rival noble families as they battle for control of the extremely harsh desert planet Arrakis, also known as "Dune"
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Logan's Run (1976 Film)
Logan's Run
Logan's Run
is a 1976 American science fiction film, directed by Michael Anderson and starring Michael York, Jenny Agutter, Richard Jordan, Roscoe Lee Browne, Farrah Fawcett, and Peter Ustinov. The screenplay by David Zelag Goodman is based on the book Logan's Run
Logan's Run
by William F. Nolan
William F. Nolan
and George Clayton Johnson. It depicts a utopian future society on the surface, revealed as a dystopia where the population and the consumption of resources are maintained in equilibrium by killing everyone who reaches the age of 30
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The Bible
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Bible
Bible
(from Koine Greek
Koine Greek
τὰ βιβλία, tà biblía, "the books")[1] is a collection of sacred texts or scriptures that Jews
Jews
and Christians consider to be a product of divine inspiration and a record of the relationship between God and humans. Many different authors contributed to the Bible
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John Huston
John Marcellus Huston (/ˈhjuːstən/; August 5, 1906 – August 28, 1987) was an American-Irish film director, screenwriter and actor.[3] He wrote the screenplays for most of the 37 feature films he directed, many of which are today considered classics: The Maltese Falcon (1941), The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948), The Asphalt Jungle (1950), The African Queen (1951), The Misfits (1961), Fat City (1972) and The Man Who Would Be King (1975). During his 46-year career, Huston received 15 Oscar nominations, won twice, and directed both his father, Walter Huston, and daughter, Anjelica Huston, to Oscar wins in different films. Huston was known to direct with the vision of an artist, having studied and worked as a fine art painter in Paris in his early years. He continued to explore the visual aspects of his films throughout his career: sketching each scene on paper beforehand, then carefully framing his characters during the shooting
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Broadcast Media
Broadcasting
Broadcasting
is the distribution of audio or video content to a dispersed audience via any electronic mass communications medium, but typically one using the electromagnetic spectrum (radio waves), in a one-to-many model.[1][2] Broadcasting
Broadcasting
began with AM radio, which came into popular use around 1920 with the spread of vacuum tube radio transmitters and receivers. Before this, all forms of electronic communication (early radio, telephone, and telegraph) were one-to-one, with the message intended for a single recipient
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George C. Scott
George Campbell Scott
Campbell Scott
(October 18, 1927 – September 22, 1999) was an American stage and film actor, director, and producer. He was best known for his stage work, as well as his portrayal of General George S. Patton in the film Patton, as General Buck Turgidson
Buck Turgidson
in Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove
Dr. Strangelove
or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, and as Ebenezer Scrooge
Ebenezer Scrooge
in Clive Donner's 1984 film A Christmas Carol. He was the first actor to refuse the Academy Award for Best Actor
Actor
(for Patton in 1970), having warned the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences months in advance that he would do so on philosophical grounds if he won
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70 Mm Grandeur Film
Grandeur may refer to:70 mm Grandeur film Hyundai Grandeur, a car introduced in 1986 Grandeur of the Seas, a cruise ship placed in service in 1996 Delusions of grandeur
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Atlanta, Georgia
Atlanta
Atlanta
(/ætˈlæntə/) is the capital and most populous city of the state of Georgia in the United States. With an estimated 2016 population of 472,522,[12] it is the cultural and economic center of the Atlanta
Atlanta
metropolitan area, home to 5.8 million people and the ninth-largest metropolitan area in the United States.[6] Atlanta
Atlanta
is the seat of Fulton County and a small portion of the city extends eastward into DeKalb County. Atlanta
Atlanta
was founded as a transportation hub at the intersection of two railroad lines in 1837. After being mostly burned to the ground during the American Civil War, the city rose from its ashes to become a national center of commerce and the unofficial capital of the "New South". During the 1960s, Atlanta
Atlanta
became a major organizing center of the civil rights movement, with Dr
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Around The World In 80 Days
Around the World in Eighty Days
Around the World in Eighty Days
(French: Le tour du monde en quatre-vingts jours) is a classic adventure novel by the French writer Jules Verne, published in 1873. In the story, Phileas Fogg
Phileas Fogg
of London and his newly employed French valet Passepartout attempt to circumnavigate the world in 80 days on a £20,000 wager (£2,075,400 in 2017)[3] set by his friends at the Reform Club. It is one of Verne's most acclaimed works.[4]Contents1 Plot summary 2 Background and analysis 3 Real life imitations 4 Origins 5 Adaptations and influences5.1 Literature 5.2 Theatre 5.3 Radio 5.4 Film 5.5 Television 5.6 Games 5.7 Internet 5.8 Other6 References 7 Footnotes 8 External linksPlot summary[edit] The story starts in London
London
on Tuesday, 1 October 1872. Phileas Fogg
Phileas Fogg
is a rich British gentleman living in solitude
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Negative (photography)
In photography, a negative is an image, usually on a strip or sheet of transparent plastic film, in which the lightest areas of the photographed subject appear darkest and the darkest areas appear lightest. This reversed order occurs because the extremely light-sensitive chemicals a camera film must use to capture an image quickly enough for ordinary picture-taking are darkened, rather than bleached, by exposure to light and subsequent photographic processing. In the case of color negatives, the colors are also reversed into their respective complementary colors. Typical color negatives have an overall dull orange tint due to an automatic color-masking feature that ultimately results in improved color reproduction. Negatives are normally used to make positive prints on photographic paper by projecting the negative onto the paper with a photographic enlarger or making a contact print
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Chapter 11
Chapter 11 is a chapter of Title 11 of the United States
United States
Bankruptcy Code, which permits reorganization under the bankruptcy laws of the United States
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Movie Palace
A movie palace (or picture palace in the United Kingdom) is any of the large, elaborately decorated movie theaters built between the 1910s and the 1940s. The late 1920s saw the peak of the movie palace, with hundreds opened every year between 1925 and 1930. With the advent of television, movie attendance dropped and many movie palaces were razed or converted into multiple screen venues or performing arts centers. There are three architectural design types of movie palaces. First, the classical style movie palace, with its opulent, luxurious architecture; second, the atmospheric theatre which has an auditorium ceiling that resembles an open sky as a defining feature; and finally, the Art Deco
Art Deco
theaters that became popular in the 1930s.Contents1 Background 2 History2.1 Decline3 Design 4 List of movie palaces 5 See also 6 Citations 7 References 8 External linksBackground[edit] Paid exhibition of motion pictures began on April 14, 1894, at Andrew M
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Photographic Lens
A camera lens (also known as photographic lens or photographic objective) is an optical lens or assembly of lenses used in conjunction with a camera body and mechanism to make images of objects either on photographic film or on other media capable of storing an image chemically or electronically. There is no major difference in principle between a lens used for a still camera, a video camera, a telescope, a microscope, or other apparatus, but the detailed design and construction are different. A lens might be permanently fixed to a camera, or it might be interchangeable with lenses of different focal lengths, apertures, and other properties. While in principle a simple convex lens will suffice, in practice a compound lens made up of a number of optical lens elements is required to correct (as much as possible) the many optical aberrations that arise. Some aberrations will be present in any lens system
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