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Tobacco Road (novel)
Tobacco Road is a 1932 novel by Erskine Caldwell
Erskine Caldwell
about Georgia sharecroppers. It was dramatized for Broadway by Jack Kirkland in 1933, and ran for eight years, an astounding feat for a non-musical, and remains the second-longest running play in Broadway history. A 1941 film version, deliberately played mainly for laughs, was directed by John Ford, and the storyline was considerably altered. The novel itself was included in Life magazine's list of the 100 outstanding books of 1924–1944.[1]Contents1 Plot introduction 2 Plot summary 3 In popular culture 4 References 5 External linksPlot introduction[edit] Tobacco Road is set in rural Georgia, several miles outside Augusta, Georgia during the worst years of the Great Depression. It depicts a family of poor white tenant farmers, the Lesters, as one of the many small Southern cotton farmers made redundant by the industrialization of production and the migration into cities
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Scribners
Charles Scribner's Sons, or simply Scribner's or Scribner, is an American publisher based in New York City, known for publishing American authors including Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Kurt Vonnegut, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Stephen King, Robert A. Heinlein, Thomas Wolfe, George Santayana, John Clellon Holmes, Don DeLillo, and Edith Wharton. The firm published Scribner's Magazine
Scribner's Magazine
for many years. More recently, several Scribner titles and authors have garnered Pulitzer Prizes, National Book Awards and other merits. In 1978 the company merged with Atheneum and became The Scribner Book Companies. In turn it merged into Macmillan in 1984.[1] Simon & Schuster bought Macmillan in 1994.[2] By this point only the trade book and reference book operations still bore the original family name
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Cotton Mill
A cotton mill is a factory housing powered spinning or weaving machinery for the production of yarn or cloth from cotton,[1] an important product during the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
when the early mills were important in the development of the factory system.[2] Although some were driven by animal power, most early mills were built in rural locations near to fast-flowing rivers and streams and had water wheels to power them.[3] The development of viable rotative steam engines by Boulton and Watt
Boulton and Watt
led from 1781 to the growth of larger, steam-powered mills and allowed them to be concentrated in urban mill towns, most notably Manchester, which with neighbouring Salford had more than 50 mills by 1802.[4] The mechanisation of the spinning process in the early factories was instrumental in the growth of the machine tool industry, enabling the construction of larger cotton mills
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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AllMovie
AllMovie[2] (previously All Movie Guide) is an online guide service website with information about films, television programs, and screen actors.[3] As of 2013, AllMovie.com and the AllMovie
AllMovie
consumer brand are owned by All Media Network.[4]Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Further information on AllMovie's history: All Media Network § History AllMovie
AllMovie
was founded by popular-culture archivist Michael Erlewine, who also founded AllMusic and AllGame. The AllMovie
AllMovie
database was licensed to tens of thousands of distributors and retailers for point-of-sale systems, websites and kiosks
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Jack Benny
Golden Globe for Best TV Show (1958) Primetime Emmy
Emmy
Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series (1957, 1959)more Jack Benny
Jack Benny
(born Benjamin Kubelsky; February 14, 1894 – December 26, 1974) was an American comedian, vaudevillian, radio, television and film actor, and violinist. Recognized as a leading American entertainer of the 20th century, Benny portrayed his character as a miser, playing his violin badly
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Texaco Star Theater
Texaco
Texaco
Star Theatre was an American comedy-variety show, broadcast on radio from 1938 to 1949 and telecast from 1948 to 1956. It was one of the first successful examples of American television broadcasting, remembered as the show that gave Milton Berle
Milton Berle
the nickname "Mr Television". The classic 1940–44 version of the program, hosted by radio's Fred Allen, was followed by a radio series on ABC (the former NBC
NBC
Blue) in the spring of 1948. When Texaco
Texaco
(now Chevron Corporation) first took it to television on NBC
NBC
on June 8, 1948, the show had a huge cultural impact.Contents1 Radio 2 Television 3 Title changes 4 Broadcast history 5 U.S
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Fred Allen
John Florence Sullivan (May 31, 1894 – March 17, 1956), known professionally as Fred Allen, was an American comedian whose absurdist, topically pointed radio program The Fred Allen
Fred Allen
Show (1932–1949) made him one of the most popular and forward-looking humorists in the Golden Age of American radio.[1][2] His best-remembered gag was his long-running mock feud with friend and fellow comedian Jack Benny, but it was only part of his appeal; radio historian John Dunning (in On the Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio) wrote that Allen was radio's most admired comedian and most frequently censored. A master ad libber, Allen often tangled with his network's executives (and often barbed them on the air over the battles) while developing routines whose style and substance influenced fellow comic talents, including Groucho Marx, Stan Freberg, Henry Morgan and Johnny Carson; his avowed fans also included President Franklin D
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Henry Hull
Henry Watterson Hull (October 3, 1890 – March 8, 1977) was an American character actor with a unique voice who is best remembered for playing the lead role in Universal Pictures's Werewolf of London (1935).[1]Contents1 Life and career 2 Family 3 Partial filmography 4 References 5 External linksLife and career[edit] Hull was born in Louisville, Kentucky, the son of William Madison Hull and Elinor Bond Vaughn.[2] Werewolf of London
Werewolf of London
figureEarly in his career, Hull appeared frequently on Broadway; he created the role of Jeeter Lester in the long-running play Tobacco Road (1933), based on the novel by Erskine Caldwell.[1] Hull appeared in 74 films between 1917 and 1966, often playing supporting characters like the uncle of Tyrone Power's love interest Nancy Kelly
Nancy Kelly
in Jesse James (1939). He appeared as Charles Rittenhouse, a wealthy industrialist in Alfred Hitchcock's Lifeboat (1944)
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Carex Scoparia
Carex scoparia is a species of sedge known by the common names broom sedge and pointed broom sedge. It should not be confused with the unrelated grass species known as "broom sedge," Andropogon virginicus. Distribution[edit] This sedge is native to much of North America, including the southern half of Canada and most of the continental United States, from California to Maine. Carex scoparia can be found in many types of wetland habitat, and in generally wet places from meadows to irrigation ditches. Also, it is adaptable to varying soils and other hydrologic conditions. It is known as an introduced species in New Zealand and parts of Europe. Description[edit] Carex scoparia produces dense clumps of stems 20 centimeters to one meter tall with narrow grasslike leaves up to about 30 centimeters long. The inflorescence is a cluster or open array of several bullet-shaped spikes of flowers. The spikes are light green and age to tan or brown
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Absentee Landlord
In economics, an absentee landlord is a person who owns and rents out a profit-earning property, but does not live within the property's local economic region. The term "absentee ownership" was popularised by economist Thorstein Veblen's 1923 book of the same name, Absentee ownership.[1] When used in a local context, the term refers to a landlord of a house or other real estate, who leases the property to tenants, but fails to ensure that proper maintenance is done on it
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American South
The Southern United States, also known as the American South, Dixie, Dixieland and the South, is a region of the United States
United States
of America. The South does not fully match the geographic south of the United States but is commonly defined as including the states that fought for the Confederate States of America
Confederate States of America
in the American Civil War.[2] The Deep South
Deep South
is fully located in the southeastern corner
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Quercus Marilandica
Quercus
Quercus
marilandica (blackjack oak) is a small oak, one of the red oak group Quercus
Quercus
sect. Lobatae. It is native to the eastern and central United States, from Long Island
Long Island
to Florida, west as far as Texas, Oklahoma, and Nebraska. There are reports of a few isolated populations in southern Michigan, but these appear to represent introductions.[5][6]Blackjack oak leavesBlackjack oak stump, approx. 75 years old Quercus
Quercus
marilandica is a small deciduous tree growing to 15 meters (49 feet) tall, with bark cracked into rectangular black plates with narrow orange fissures. The leaves are 7–20 cm (3–8 in) long and broad, and typically flare from a tapered base to a broad three-lobed bell shape with only shallow indentations
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Marriage License
A marriage license is a document issued, either by a church or state authority, authorizing a couple to marry. The procedure for obtaining a license varies between countries and has changed over time. Marriage licenses began to be issued in the Middle Ages, to permit a marriage which would otherwise be illegal (for instance, if the necessary period of notice for the marriage had not been given). Today, they are a legal requirement in some jurisdictions and may also serve as the record of the marriage itself, if signed by the couple and witnessed. In other jurisdictions, a license is not required. In some jurisdictions, a "pardon" can be obtained for marrying without a license, and in some jurisdictions, common-law marriages and marriage by cohabitation and representation are also recognized. These do not require a marriage license
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Ford Model T
The Ford Model T
Model T
(colloquially known as the Tin Lizzie, Leaping Lena, or flivver) is an automobile produced by Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
from
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Calico (fabric)
Calico
Calico
(in British usage since 1505[1]) is a plain-woven textile made from unbleached and often not fully processed cotton. It may contain unseparated husk parts, for example. The fabric is far less fine than muslin, but less coarse and thick than canvas or denim, but it is still very cheap owing to its unfinished and undyed appearance. The fabric was originally from the city of Calicut
Calicut
in southwestern India. It was made by the traditional weavers called cāliyans
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