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Titanium Isopropoxide
Titanium
Titanium
isopropoxide, also commonly referred to as titanium tetraisopropoxide or TTIP, is a chemical compound with the formula Ti OCH(CH3)2 4. This alkoxide of titanium(IV) is used in organic synthesis and materials science. It is a diamagnetic tetrahedral molecule. Titanium
Titanium
isopropoxide is a component of the Sharpless epoxidation, a Nobel-Prize-winning method for the synthesis of chiral epoxides.[1][2] The structures of the titanium alkoxides are often complex. Crystalline titanium methoxide is tetrameric with the molecular formula Ti4(OCH3)16.[3] Alkoxides derived from bulkier alcohols such as isopropanol aggregate less
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Tetrahedron (journal)
Tetrahedron is a weekly peer-reviewed scientific journal covering the field of organic chemistry. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2014 impact factor of 2.641.[1]Tetrahedron and Elsevier, its publisher, support an annual symposium.[2] In 2010, complaints were raised over its high subscription cost.[3]Contents1 Notable papers 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksNotable papers[edit] As of 22 June 2013[update], the Web of Science
Web of Science
lists ten papers from Tetrahedron that have more than 1000 citations. The four articles that have been cited more than 2000 times are:Wiberg, K. B. (1968). "Application of pople-santry-segal CNDO method to the cyclopropylcarbinyl and cyclobutyl cation and to bicyclobutane". Tetrahedron. 24 (3): 1083. doi:10.1016/0040-4020(68)88057-3.  – cited 2228 times Haasnoot, C. A. G.; de Leeuw, F. A. A. M.; Altona, C. (1980)
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J. Am. Chem. Soc.
The Journal of the American Chemical Society
American Chemical Society
(also known as JACS) is a weekly peer-reviewed scientific journal that was established in 1879 by the American Chemical Society.[1] The journal has absorbed two other publications in its history, the Journal of Analytical and Applied Chemistry
Chemistry
(July 1893) and the American Chemical Journal (January 1914). It publishes original research papers in all fields of chemistry. Since 2002, the journal is edited by Peter J. Stang (University of Utah).[2] In 2014, the journal moved to a hybrid open access publishing model. Abstracting and indexing[edit] The Journal of the American Chemical Society
American Chemical Society
is abstracted and indexed in Chemical Abstracts Service, Scopus, EBSCOhost, Thomson-Gale, ProQuest, PubMed, Web of Science, and SwetsWise
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Materials Science
The interdisciplinary field of materials science, also commonly termed materials science and engineering is the design and discovery of new materials, particularly solids. The intellectual origins of materials science stem from the Enlightenment, when researchers began to use analytical thinking from chemistry, physics, and engineering to understand ancient, phenomenological observations in metallurgy and mineralogy.[1][2] Materials science
Materials science
still incorporates elements of physics, chemistry, and engineering. As such, the field was long considered by academic institutions as a sub-field of these related fields
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Diamagnetic
Diamagnetic materials are repelled by a magnetic field; an applied magnetic field creates an induced magnetic field in them in the opposite direction, causing a repulsive force. In contrast, paramagnetic and ferromagnetic materials are attracted by a magnetic field. Diamagnetism
Diamagnetism
is a quantum mechanical effect that occurs in all materials; when it is the only contribution to the magnetism, the material is called diamagnetic. In paramagnetic and ferromagnetic substances the weak diamagnetic force is overcome by the attractive force of magnetic dipoles in the material
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Tetramer
A tetramer (/ˈtɛtrəmər/) (tetra-, "four" + -mer, "parts") is an oligomer formed from four monomers or subunits. The associated propriety is called tetramery. An example from inorganic chemistry is titanium methoxide with the empirical formula Ti(OCH3)4, which is tetrameric in the solid state and has the molecular formula Ti4(OCH3)16.[1] An example from organic chemistry is kobophenol A, a substance that is formed by combining four molecules of resveratrol.[2][3] In biochemistry, it similarly refers to a biomolecule formed of four units, that are the same (homotetramer), i.e. as in Concanavalin A
Concanavalin A
or different (heterotetramer), i.e. as in hemoglobin. Hemoglobin
Hemoglobin
has 4 similar sub-units while immunoglobulins have 2 very different sub-units
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Molecular Formula
A chemical formula is a way of information about the chemical proportions of atoms that constitute a particular chemical compound or molecule, using chemical element symbols, numbers, and sometimes also other symbols, such as parentheses, dashes, brackets, commas and plus (+) and minus (−) signs. These are limited to a single typographic line of symbols, which may include subscripts and superscripts. A chemical formula is not a chemical name, and it contains no words. Although a chemical formula may imply certain simple chemical structures, it is not the same as a full chemical structural formula. Chemical formulas can fully specify the structure of only the simplest of molecules and chemical substances, and are generally more limited in power than are chemical names and structural formulas. The simplest types of chemical formulas are called empirical formulas, which use letters and numbers indicating the numerical proportions of atoms of each type
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Hydrogen Chloride
Hydrochloric gas HydrochlorideIdentifiersCAS Number7647-01-0 Y3D model (JSmol)Interactive imageBeilstein Reference1098214ChEBICHEBI:17883 YChEMBLChEMBL1231821 NChemSpider307 YECHA InfoCard 100.028.723EC Number 231-595-7Gmelin Reference322KEGGD02057 YMeSH Hydrochloric+acid RTECS number MW4025000UNIIQTT17582CB YUN number 1050InChIInChI=1S/HCl/h1H N Key: VEXZGXHMUGYJMC-UHFFFAOYSA-N YInChI=1/HCl/h1H Key: VEXZGXHMUGYJMC-UHFFFAOYATSMILESClPropertiesChemical formulaHClMolar mass 36.46 g/molAppearance Colorless gasOdor pungent; sharp and burningDensity 1.49 g L−1[2]
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Sol-gel
In materials science, the sol–gel process is a method for producing solid materials from small molecules. The method is used for the fabrication of metal oxides, especially the oxides of silicon and titanium. The process involves conversion of monomers into a colloidal solution (sol) that acts as the precursor for an integrated network (or gel) of either discrete particles or network polymers
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Acetic Acid
Acetamide Acetic anhydride Acetonitrile Acetyl
Acetyl
chloride Ethanol Ethyl acetate Potassium acetate Sodium acetate Thioacetic acidSupplementary data pageStructure and properties Refractive index
Refractive index
(n), Dielectric constant
Dielectric constant
(εr), etc.Thermodynamic dataPhase behaviour solid–liquid–gasSpectral dataUV, IR, NMR, MSExcept where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).N verify (what is YN ?)Infobox references Acetic acid
Acetic acid
/əˈsiːtɪk/, systematically named ethanoic acid /ˌɛθəˈnoʊɪk/, is a colourless liquid organic compound with the chemical formula CH3COOH (also written as CH3CO2H or C2H4O2). When undiluted, it is sometimes called glacial acetic acid
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K. Barry Sharpless
Karl Barry Sharpless (born April 28, 1941) is an American chemist known for his work on stereoselective reactions. He is a recipient of the 2001 Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
in Chemistry.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early years 1.2 Academic career 1.3 Research 1.4 Personal life2 References 3 External linksBiography[edit] Early years[edit] Sharpless was born April 28, 1941 in Philadelphia, PA. He graduated from Friends' Central School
Friends' Central School
in 1959. He continued his studies at Dartmouth College
Dartmouth College
earning an A.B. in 1963 and a Ph.D. in chemistry from Stanford University
Stanford University
in 1968. He continued post-doctoral work at Stanford University
Stanford University
(1968–1969) and Harvard University (1969–1970)
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Chemical Compound
A chemical compound is a chemical substance composed of many identical molecules (or molecular entities) composed of atoms from more than one element held together by chemical bonds. There are four types of compounds, depending on how the constituent atoms are held together:molecules held together by covalent bonds ionic compounds held together by ionic bonds intermetallic compounds held together by metallic bonds certain complexes held together by coordinate covalent bonds.Many chemical compounds have a unique numerical identifier assigned by the Chemical Abstracts Service
Chemical Abstracts Service
(CAS): its CAS number. A chemical formula is a way of expressing information about the proportions of atoms that constitute a particular chemical compound, using the standard abbreviations for the chemical elements, and subscripts to indicate the number of atoms involved
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Org. Syn.
Organic Syntheses is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that was established in 1921. It publishes detailed and checked procedures for the synthesis of organic compounds. A unique feature of the review process is that all of the data and experiments reported in an article must be successfully repeated in the laboratory of a member of the editorial board as a check for reproducibility prior to publication.[1][2] The journal is published by Organic Syntheses, Inc., a non-profit corporation.[3] An annual print version is published by John Wiley & Sons on behalf of Organic Syntheses, Inc.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Prior to World War I, work on synthetic organic chemistry in the United States had been quite limited, and most of the reagents used in laboratories had to be imported from Europe
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Acta Crystallographica B
Acta Crystallographica is a series of peer-reviewed scientific journals, with articles centred on crystallography, published by the International Union of Crystallography (IUCr). Originally established in 1948 as a single journal called Acta Crystallographica,[1] there are now six independent Acta Crystallographica titles: Acta Crystallographica Section A: Foundations and Advances, Acta Crystallographica Section B: Structural Science, Crystal Engineering and Materials, Acta Crystallographica Section C: Structural Chemistry, Acta Crystallographica Section D: Structural Biology, Acta Crystallographica Section E: Crystallographic Communications and Acta Crystallographica Section F: Structural Biology Communications
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Donald Charlton Bradley
Donald Charlton Bradley CBE FRS, (7 November 1924 – 20 December 2014) was a British chemist, who won the Royal Medal in 1998.[1] Life[edit] He earned a first-class Bachelor’s Degree in 1946, a PhD in 1950 and a DSc in 1959, from Birkbeck, University of London. He was Chair of Inorganic Chemistry at Queen Mary, University of London, from 1965 to 1983.[1] Bradley was recognized for his work on the chemistry of metal-alkoxides and metal-amides, their synthesis, structure and bonding, and for his studies of their conversions to metal-oxides and metal-nitrides. His advances are presently being applied in microelectronics and chemical vapor deposition.[2] Bradley was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1977 and was a faculty member of Imperial College. He died on 20 December 2014.[3][4] References[edit]^ a b "Obituary: Professor Donald Bradley FRS". Birkbeck, University of London
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