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Tissue Paper
Tissue paper
Tissue paper
or simply tissue is a lightweight paper or, light crêpe paper. Tissue can be made from recycled paper pulp. Tissue paper
Tissue paper
sheetContents1 Properties 2 Production 3 Applications3.1 Hygienic tissue paper 3.2 Facial tissues 3.3 Paper
Paper
towels 3.4 Wrapping tissue 3.5 Toilet tissue 3.6 Table napkins 3.7 Acoustic disrupter 3.8 Road repair 3.9 Packing industry4 The industry4.1 Companies5 Sustainability5.1 Types of eco-labels6 See also 7 ReferencesProperties[edit] Key properties are absorbency, basis weight, thickness, bulk (specific volume), brightness, stretch, appearance and comfort. Production[edit] Main article: Fourdrinier machine Tissue paper
Tissue paper
is produced on a paper machine that has a single large steam heated drying cylinder (yankee dryer) fitted with a hot air hood. The raw material is paper pulp
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Azo Compound
Azo compounds are compounds bearing the functional group R−N=N−R′, in which R and R′ can be either aryl or alkyl. IUPAC defines azo compounds as: "Derivatives of diazene (diimide), HN=NH, wherein both hydrogens are substituted by hydrocarbyl groups, e.g. PhN=NPh azobenzene or diphenyldiazene."[1] The more stable derivatives contain two aryl groups. The N=N group is called an azo group. The name azo comes from azote, the French name for nitrogen that is derived from the Greek ἀ- (a-, "not") + ζωή (zōē, life). Many textile and leather articles are dyed with azo dyes and pigments.[2]Contents1 Aryl
Aryl
azo compounds 2 Alkyl
Alkyl
azo compounds 3 Safety and regulation3.1 European regulation4 See also 5 References Aryl
Aryl
azo compounds[edit] Aryl
Aryl
azo compounds are usually stable, crystalline species. Azobenzene is the prototypical aromatic azo compound
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Global Player
A multinational corporation (MNC) or worldwide enterprise[5] is a corporate organization that owns or controls production of goods or services in at least one country other than its home country.[6] A multinational corporation can also be referred to as a multinational enterprise (MNE), a transnational enterprise (TNE), a transnational corporation (TNC), an international corporation, or a stateless corporation.[7] There are subtle but real differences between these three labels, as well as multinational corporation and worldwide enterprise. Multinational corporations are subject to criticisms for lacking ethical standards, and that this shows up in how they evade ethical laws and leverage their own business agenda with capital, and even the military backing of their own wealthy host nation-states.Contents1 Overview 2 Theoretical background 3 Transnational corporations 4 Multinational enterprise 5
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Comb Filter
In signal processing, a comb filter is a filter implemented by adding a delayed version of a signal to itself, causing constructive and destructive interference
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Trade Association
A trade association, also known as an industry trade group, business association, sector association or industry body, is an organization founded and funded by businesses that operate in a specific industry. An industry trade association participates in public relations activities such as advertising, education, political donations, lobbying and publishing, but its focus is collaboration between companies. Associations may offer other services, such as producing conferences, networking or charitable events or offering classes or educational materials
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Bob Clearmountain
Bob Clearmountain
Bob Clearmountain
is an American music engineer, mixer and producer. He has worked with many prominent names in music including Bruce Springsteen (mixing Springsteen's Born in the U.S.A.), The Rolling Stones (re-mixes of the singles "Miss You" and "Out of Tears") as well as their Tattoo You
Tattoo You
album, Bryan Adams
Bryan Adams
(mixing almost all of his albums since Reckless), Robbie Williams
Robbie Williams
(Intensive Care), Toto, Bon Jovi (These Days, Crush, Bounce), Altered State, Simple Minds, and 235 other artists.[1] He has been nominated for four Grammy
Grammy
Awards and won a Latin Grammy
Grammy
Award in 2007 for Best Male Pop Vocal Album for his work with engineering Ricky Martin's "MTV Unplugged"
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Brussels
Brussels
Brussels
(French: Bruxelles, [bʁysɛl] ( listen); Dutch: Brussel, [ˈbrɵsəl] ( listen)), officially the Brussels-Capital Region[6][7] (French: Région de Bruxelles-Capitale, Dutch: Brussels
Brussels
Hoofdstedelijk Gewest),[8] is a region of Belgium comprising 19 municipalities, including the City of Brussels, which is the de jure capital of Belgium.[9] The Brussels-Capital Region
Brussels-Capital Region
is located in the central portion of the country and is a part of both the French Community of Belgium[10] and the Flemish Community,[11] but is separate from the region of Flanders
Flanders
(in which it forms an enclave) or Wallonia.[12][13] Compared to most regions in Europe, Brussels
Brussels
has a relatively small territory, with an area of 161 km2 (62 sq mi)
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Aromatic Amine
An aromatic amine is an organic compound consisting of an aromatic ring attached to an amine. It is a broad class of compounds that encompasses anilines, but also many more complex aromatic rings and many amine substituents beyond NH2
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Carcinogenic
A carcinogen is any substance, radionuclide, or radiation that promotes carcinogenesis, the formation of cancer. This may be due to the ability to damage the genome or to the disruption of cellular metabolic processes. Several radioactive substances are considered carcinogens, but their carcinogenic activity is attributed to the radiation, for example gamma rays and alpha particles, which they emit. Common examples of non-radioactive carcinogens are inhaled asbestos, certain dioxins, and tobacco smoke
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AF&PA
The American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) is the national trade association of the forest products industry, representing manufacturers of approximately 80 percent of the U.S. pulp and paper industry and 50 percent of the wood building material capacity. AF&PA was formed on January 1, 1993 by the merger of the National Forest Product Association and the American Paper Institute.[1] Membership includes scores of companies and industry associations; among them, AbitibiBowater Inc., Boise Cascade LLC, Duro Bag Mfg, Georgia-Pacific LLC, International Paper Company, NewPage Corporation, Norbord Inc., Smurfit-Stone Container Corp., Sonoco Products Company, Verso Paper, and Weyerhaeuser Company. AF&PA's primary work is public policy advocacy at the international, national, state and local levels and, according to the Center for Public Integrity, it spent about $20 million from 1998-2004 on these efforts
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Economic Growth
Economic growth
Economic growth
is the increase in the inflation-adjusted market value of the goods and services produced by an economy over time
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Urbanization
Urbanization
Urbanization
refers to the population shift from rural to urban areas, "the gradual increase in the proportion of people living in urban areas", and the ways in which each society adapts to the change.[1] It is predominantly the process by which towns and cities are formed and become larger as more people begin living and working in central areas.[2] The United Nations
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Disposable Income
Disposable income is total personal income minus personal current taxes.[1] In national accounts definitions, personal income minus personal current taxes equals disposable personal income.[2] Subtracting personal outlays (which includes the major category of personal [or private] consumption expenditure) yields personal (or, private) savings, hence the income left after paying away all the taxes is referred to as disposable income. Restated, consumption expenditure plus savings equals disposable income[3] after accounting for transfers such as payments to children in school or elderly parents’ living and care arrangements.[4] The marginal propensity to consume (MPC) is the fraction of a change in disposable income that is consumed. For example, if disposable income rises by $100, and $65 of that $100 is consumed, the MPC is 65%
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Consumer Spending
Consumer spending, consumption, or consumption expenditure is the acquisition of goods and services by individuals or families. It is the largest part of aggregate demand at the macroeconomic level. There are two components of consumer spending: induced consumption (which is affected by the level of income) and autonomous consumption (which is not).Contents1 Macroeconomic factors1.1 Taxes 1.2 Consumer sentiment 1.3 Government
Government
economic stimulus 1.4 Fuel2 Data2.1 United States3 See also 4 ReferencesMacroeconomic factors[edit] Taxes[edit] Taxes
Taxes
are a tool in the adjustment of the economy. Tax policies designed by governments affect consumer groups, net consumer spending and consumer confidence
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Consumer Sector
One classical breakdown of economic activity distinguishes three sectors:[1]Primary: involves the retrieval and production of raw materials, such as corn, coal, wood and iron. (A coal miner, farmer or fisherman would be workers in the primary sector.) Secondary: involves the transformation of raw or intermediate materials into goods e.g. manufacturing steel into cars, or textiles into clothing. (A builder and a dressmaker would be workers in the secondary sector.) Tertiary: involves the supplying of services to consumers and businesses, such as baby-sitting, cinema and banking. (A shopkeeper and an accountant would be workers in the tertiary sector.)In the 20th century, economists began to suggest that traditional tertiary services could be further distinguished from "quaternary" and quinary service sectors
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Essity
Essity
Essity
is a Swedish hygiene and health company, formerly a part of SCA.Contents1 History 2 Brands2.1 Libresse 2.2 Plenty 2.3 Tempo 2.4 TENA 2.5 Tork 2.6 Vinda 2.7 Zewa / Cushelle3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] SCA entered the paper-based consumer goods market early on. In 1975, SCA acquired Mölnlycke Health Care, a leading western European producer of disposable hygiene products. In 1995 they acquired the German paper and packaging company PWA. In 2001 the division Wisconsin Tissue of the United States company Georgia-Pacific Tissue was acquired
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