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Tissington
Tissington
Tissington
is a village in the Derbyshire
Derbyshire
Dales district of Derbyshire, England. The appropriate civil parish is called Tissington and Lea Hall. The population of this parish at the 2011 census was 159.[1] It is part of the estate of Tissington
Tissington
Hall, owned by the FitzHerbert family since 1465. It is a popular tourist attraction, particularly during its well dressing week. It also gives its name to the Tissington
Tissington
Trail, a 13-mile (21 km) walk and cycle path which passes nearby
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Baptismal Font
A baptismal font is an article of church furniture used for baptism.Contents1 Aspersion and affusion fonts 2 Immersion fonts 3 Examples3.1 Aspersion and affusion fonts 3.2 Immersion fonts4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External links Aspersion and affusion fonts[edit] The fonts of many Christian denominations are for baptisms using a non-immersive method, such as aspersion (sprinkling) or affusion (pouring). The simplest of these fonts has a pedestal (about 1.5 metres tall) with a holder for a basin of water. The materials vary greatly consisting of carved and sculpted marble, wood, or metal. The shape can vary. Many are eight-sided as a reminder of the new creation and as a connection to the practice of circumcision, which traditionally occurs on the eighth day
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Domesday Book
Domesday Book
Domesday Book
(/ˈduːmzdeɪ/ or US: /ˈdoʊmzdeɪ/;[1][2] Latin: Liber de Wintonia "Book of Winchester") is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:[3]Then, at the midwinter [1085], was the king in Gloucester
Gloucester
with his council ... . After this had the king a large meeting, and very deep consultation with his council, about this land; how it was occupied, and by what sort of men
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county, unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates.A B C D E F G H I, J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X–ZSee also External linksThe United KingdomLocation names beginning with ALocation names beginning with Aa–Ak Location names beginning with Al Location names beginning with Am–Ar Location names beginning with As–AzLocation names beginning with BLocation names beginning with Bab–Bal Location names beginning with Bam
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List Of Places In England
Here is a list of places, divided by ceremonial county of England.Northumberland Durham Lancashire Cheshire Derbs. Notts. Lincolnshire Leics. Staffs. Shropshire Warks. Northants. Norfolk Suffolk Essex Herts. Beds. Bucks. Oxon. Glos. Somerset Wiltshire Berkshire Kent Surrey Hampshire Dorset Devon Cornwall Heref. Worcs. Bristol East Riding of Yorkshire Rutland Cambs. Greater London Tyne & Wear Cumbria North Yorkshire South Yorks. West Yorkshire Greater Manc. Merseyside East Sussex West Sussex Isle of Wight West MidlandsSee also[edit]Toponymy of Great Britain Toponymical list of counties of the United Kingdom List of generic forms in British place names List of places in the United Kingdom Subdivisions of the United Kingdom List of places in Northern Ireland List of places in Scotland List of places in Wales List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in Englandv t eList of places in EnglandBedfordshire Berkshire Bristol Buckinghamshire
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Civil Parish
In England, a civil parish is a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. It is an administrative parish, in contrast to an ecclesiastical parish. A civil parish can range in size from a large town with a population of about 80,000 to a single village with fewer than a hundred inhabitants. In a limited number of cases a parish might include a whole city where city status has been granted by the Monarch. Reflecting this diverse nature, a civil parish may be known as a town, village, neighbourhood or community by resolution of its parish council. Approximately 35% of the English population live in a civil parish
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Estate (house)
Historically, an estate comprises the houses, outbuildings, supporting farmland, and woods that surround the gardens and grounds of a very large property, such as a country house or mansion. It is the modern term for a manor, but lacks a manor's now-abolished jurisdictional authority. It is an "estate" because the profits from its produce and rents are sufficient to support the household in the house at its center, formerly known as the manor house. Thus, "the estate" may refer to all other cottages and villages in the same ownership as the mansion itself, covering more than one former manor. Examples of such great estates are Woburn Abbey
Woburn Abbey
in Bedfordshire, England, and Blenheim Palace, in Oxfordshire, England, built to replace the former manor house of Woodstock. "Estate", with its "stately home" connotations, has been a natural candidate for inflationary usage during the 20th century
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Bridleway
A bridle path, also bridleway, equestrian trail, horse riding path, ride, bridle road, or horse trail, is a path, trail or a thoroughfare that is used by people riding on horses. Trails originally created for use by horses often now serve a wider range of users, including equestrians, hikers,[1] and cyclists. Such paths are either impassable for motorized vehicles, or vehicles are banned. The laws relating to allowable uses vary from country to country.[2][3] In industrialized countries, bridle paths are now primarily used for recreation. However, they are still important transportation routes in other areas
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Old English
Old English
Old English
(Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc), or Anglo-Saxon,[2] is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland
Scotland
in the early Middle Ages. It was brought to Great Britain
Great Britain
by Anglo-Saxon settlers probably in the mid-5th century, and the first Old English
Old English
literary works date from the mid-7th century. After the Norman conquest
Norman conquest
of 1066, English was replaced, for a time, as the language of the upper classes by Anglo-Norman, a relative of French
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Henry De Ferrers
Henry de Ferrers
Henry de Ferrers
(died by 1100), magnate and administrator, was a Norman who after the 1066 Norman conquest was awarded extensive lands in England.[1]Contents1 Origins 2 Career 3 Landholdings 4 Family 5 ReferencesOrigins[edit] He was the eldest son of Walkeline de Ferrers and in about 1040 inherited his father's lands centred on the village of Ferrières-Saint-Hilaire.[2][1] Career[edit] In England he progressively acquired landholdings, which he had to manage. As one of the leading magnates, he also served King William I of England and his successor William II in administrative capacities and is said to have been castellan of Stafford Castle
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East Midlands (European Parliament Constituency)
East Midlands
East Midlands
is an English constituency of the European Parliament
European Parliament
in the United Kingdom. Established in 1999 with six members to replace single-member districts, since 2009 it has returned five MEPs, elected using the d'Hondt method of party-list proportional representation.Contents1 Boundaries 2 History 3 Returned members3.1 Complaint against Kilroy-Silk4 Election results4.1 2014 4.2 2009 4.3 2004 4.4 19995 ReferencesBoundaries[edit] The constituency corresponds to the East Midlands
East Midlands
region of England, comprising the counties of Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire, Rutland, Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
and the non-Metropolitan county of Lincolnshire. History[edit] The constituency was organized as a result of the European Parliamentary Elections Act 1999, replacing a number of single-member constituencies
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William The Conqueror
William I[a] (c. 1028[1] – 9 September 1087), usually known as William the Conqueror
William the Conqueror
and sometimes William the Bastard,[2][b] was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087. A descendant of Rollo, he was Duke
Duke
of Normandy
Normandy
(as William II) from 1035 onward. After a long struggle to establish his power, by 1060 his hold on Normandy
Normandy
was secure, and he launched the Norman conquest of England
Norman conquest of England
six years later. The rest of his life was marked by struggles to consolidate his hold over England and his continental lands and by difficulties with his eldest son. William was the son of the unmarried Robert I, Duke
Duke
of Normandy, by Robert's mistress Herleva
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Edward The Confessor
Edward the Confessor[a] (Old English: Ēadƿeard Andettere [æːɑdwæɑrˠd ɑndetere], Latin: Eduardus Confessor Classical Latin: [ɛ.dʊˈar.dʊs kɔ̃ˈfɛs.sɔr]; c. 1003 – 5 January 1066), also known as Saint
Saint
Edward the Confessor, was among the last Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
kings of England. Usually considered the last king of the House of Wessex, he ruled from 1042 to 1066. The son of Æthelred the Unready
Æthelred the Unready
and Emma of Normandy, Edward succeeded Cnut the Great's son – and his own half brother – Harthacnut, restoring the rule of the House of Wessex after the period of Danish rule since Cnut (better known as Canute) conquered England in 1016
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Henry I Of England
Henry I (c. 1068 – 1 December 1135), also known as Henry Beauclerc, was King of England
King of England
from 1100 to his death. Henry was the fourth son of William the Conqueror
William the Conqueror
and was educated in Latin
Latin
and the liberal arts. On William's death in 1087, Henry's elder brothers Robert Curthose
Robert Curthose
and William Rufus
William Rufus
inherited Normandy and England, respectively, but Henry was left landless. Henry purchased the County of Cotentin
Cotentin
in western Normandy from Robert, but William and Robert deposed him in 1091. Henry gradually rebuilt his power base in the Cotentin
Cotentin
and allied himself with William against Robert
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