HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

Geological History Of Oxygen
Before photosynthesis evolved, Earth's atmosphere had no free oxygen (O2).[2] Photosynthetic prokaryotic organisms that produced O2 as a waste product lived long before the first build-up of free oxygen in the atmosphere,[3] perhaps as early as 3.5 billion years ago. The oxygen they produced would have been rapidly removed from the oceans by weathering of reducing minerals,[citation needed] most notably iron.[4] This rusting led to the deposition of iron oxide on the ocean floor, forming banded iron formations. Thus, the oceans rusted and turned red. Oxygen only began to persist in the atmosphere in small quantities about 50 million years before the start of the Great Oxygenation Event.[5] This mass oxygenation of the atmosphere resulted in rapid buildup of free oxygen
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Age Of The Universe
In physical cosmology, the age of the universe is the time elapsed since the Big Bang. Today, astronomers have derived two different measurements of the age of the universe:[1] a measurement based on the observations of a distant, infant state of the universe, whose results are an age of around 13.8 billion years (as of 2015[2]) , 13.787±0.020 billion years within the Lambda-CDM concordance model as of 2018;[3] and a measurement based on the observations of the local, modern universe which suggest a younger universe.[4][5][6] The uncertainty of the first kind of measurement has been narrowed down to 20 million years, based on a number of studies which all gave extremely similar figures for the age. These include studies of the microwave background radiation by the Planck spacecraft, the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and other space probes
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Alpha Centauri
Alpha Centauri (Latinized from α Centauri, abbreviated Alpha Cen or α Cen) is the closest star system and closest planetary system to Earth's Solar System at 4.37 light-years (1.34 parsecs) from the Sun. It is a triple star system, consisting of three stars: α Centauri A (officially Rigil Kentaurus),[15] α Centauri B (officially Toliman),[15] and α Centauri C (officially Proxima Centauri).[15] Alpha Centauri A and B are Sun-like stars (Class G and K), and together they form the binary star Alpha Centauri AB
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Early Earth
The early Earth is loosely defined as Earth in its first one billion years, or gigayear.[1][better source needed] The “ early Earth” encompasses approximately the first gigayear (Ga, 109 y) in the evolution of our planet, from its initial formation in the young Solar System at about 4.55 Ga to sometime in the Archean eon at about 3.5 Ga.[2] On the geologic time scale, this comprises all of the Hadean eon (starting with the formation of the Earth about 4.6 billion years ago[3]), as well as the Eoarchean (starting 4 billion years ago) and part of the Paleoarchean (starting 3.6 billion years ago) eras of the Archean eon. This period of Earth's history involved the planet's formation from the solar nebula via a process known as accretion
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Formation And Evolution Of The Solar System
The formation and evolution of the Solar System began 4.5 billion years ago with the gravitational collapse of a small part of a giant molecular cloud.[1] Most of the collapsing mass collected in the center, forming the Sun, while the rest flattened into a protoplanetary disk out of which the planets, moons, asteroids, and other small Solar System bodies formed. This model, known as the nebular hypothesis was first developed in the 18th century by Emanuel Swedenborg, Immanuel Kant, and Pierre-Simon Laplace. Its subsequent development has interwoven a variety of scientific disciplines including astronomy, chemistry, geology, physics, and planetary science
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Vertebrate

The first jawed vertebrates may have appeared in the late Ordovician and became common in the Devonian, often known as the "Age of Fishes".[28] The two groups of bony fishes, the jawed vertebrates may have appeared in the late Ordovician and became common in the Devonian, often known as the "Age of Fishes".[28] The two groups of bony fishes, the actinopterygii and sarcopterygii, evolved and became common.[29] The Devonian also saw the demise of virtually all jawless fishes save for lampreys and hagfish, as well as the Placodermi, a group of armoured fish that dominated the entirety of that period since the late Silurian
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]