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Timeline Of Armenian History
This is a timeline of Armenian history, comprising important legal and territorial changes and political events in Armenia
Armenia
and its predecessor states. To read about the background to these events, see History of Armenia. See also the list of Armenian kings. This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries. Millennia: 3rd BC · 2nd BC–1st BC · 1st–2nd · 3rd Centuries: 24th BC · 23rd BC · 22nd BC · 21st BC 24th century BC[edit]Year Date Event2400 BCThe Book of Genesis
Book of Genesis
identifies the land of Ararat as the resting place of Noah's Ark after the "great deluge" described there. The Indo-Europeans were people who presumably spread from the Caucasus, settling on lands along the way
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Armenia
Coordinates: 40°N 45°E / 40°N 45°E / 40; 45 Armenia
Armenia
(/ɑːrˈmiːniə/ ( listen);[20] Armenian: Հայաստան, translit. Hayastan, IPA: [hɑjɑsˈtɑn]), officially the Republic
Republic
of Armenia
Armenia
(Armenian: Հայաստանի Հանրապետություն, translit. Hayastani Hanrapetut'yun, IPA: [hɑjɑstɑˈni hɑnɾɑpɛtutʰˈjun]), is a country in the South Caucasus
South Caucasus
region of Eurasia
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Behistun Inscription
The Behistun Inscription
Behistun Inscription
(also Bisotun, Bistun or Bisutun; Persian: بیستون‎, Old Persian: Bagastana, meaning "the place of god") is a multilingual inscription and large rock relief on a cliff at Mount Behistun
Mount Behistun
in the Kermanshah Province
Kermanshah Province
of Iran, near the city of Kermanshah
Kermanshah
in western Iran. It was crucial to the decipherment of cuneiform script. Authored by Darius the Great
Darius the Great
sometime between his coronation as king of the Persian Empire in the summer of 522 BC and his death in autumn of 486 BC, the inscription begins with a brief autobiography of Darius, including his ancestry and lineage
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Aramu
Arame or Aramu (Armenian: Արամե) (ruled 858–844 BC) was the first known king of Urartu.[1] Living at the time of King Shalmaneser III of Assyria
Assyria
(ruled 859–824 BC), Arame united the Nairi tribe against the threat of the Assyrian Empire. His capital at Arzashkun was captured by Shalmaneser.[2] Arame has been suggested as the prototype of both Aram (and, correspondingly the popular given name Aram)[3] and Ara the Beautiful, two of the legendary forefathers of the Armenian people.[4] Khorenatsi's History (1.5) puts them six and seven generations after Haik (Khaldi[disambiguation needed]),[5] in the chronology of historian Mikayel Chamchian dated to the 19th to 18th century BC. See also[edit]Ancient Near East portalList of kings of UrartuReferences[edit]^ History in Africa, Volume 2, p. 93
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Sarduri I
Sarduri I (Armenian: Սարդուրի Ա, ruled: 834 BC – 828 BC), also known as Sarduris, was a king of Urartu
Urartu
in Asia Minor. He was the son of Lutipri, the second monarch of Urartu. Sarduri I is most known for moving the capital of the Urartu
Urartu
kingdom to Tushpa
Tushpa
(Van). This proved to be significant as Tushpa
Tushpa
became the focal point of politics in the Near East
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Menuas
Menua (Armenian: Մենուա) was the fifth known king of Urartu from c. 810 BC to approximately 786 BC. A younger son of the preceding Urartuan King, Ishpuini, Menua was adopted as co-ruler by his father in the last years of his reign. Menua enlarged the kingdom through numerous wars against the neighbouring countries and left a large number of inscriptions across the region. He organized a centralised administrative structure, fortified a number of towns and constructed fortresses. Amongst these was Menuakhinili located on Mount Ararat. Menua developed a canal and irrigation system that stretched across the kingdom. Several of these canals are still in use today. He was succeeded by his son, Argishti I.[1] References[edit]^ Chahin, M. The Kingdom of Armenia: A History
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Argishtis I
Argishti I (Armenian: Արգիշտի Ա), was the sixth known king of Urartu, reigning from 786 BC to 764 BC. He founded the citadel of Erebuni in 782 BC, which is the present capital of Armenia, Yerevan.[1] A son and the successor of Menua, he continued the series of conquests initiated by his predecessors. He was involved in a number of inconclusive conflicts with the Assyrian king Shalmaneser IV. He conquered the northern part of Syria
Syria
and made Urartu
Urartu
the most powerful state in post-Hittite Asia Minor
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Erebuni Fortress
Erebuni Fortress
Erebuni Fortress
(Armenian: Էրեբունի), also known as Arin Berd (Armenian: Արին Բերդ; meaning the "Fortress of Blood"), is an Urartian fortified city, located in Yerevan, Armenia. It is 1,017 metres (3,337 ft) above sea level.[1] It was one of several fortresses built along the northern Urartian border and was one of the most important political, economic and cultural centers of the vast kingdom. The name Yerevan
Yerevan
itself is derived from Erebuni.[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Architecture 4 Excavations 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 Notes 8 Further reading 9 External linksEtymology[edit] On an inscription found at Karmir Blur, the verb erebu-ni is used in the sense of "to seize, pillage, steal, or kidnap" followed by a changing direct object
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Yerevan
Yerevan
Yerevan
(/ˌjɛrəˈvɑːn/, YE-rə-VAHN; Armenian: Երևան[a] [jɛɾɛˈvɑn] ( listen), sometimes spelled Erevan)[b] is the capital and largest city of Armenia
Armenia
as well as one of the world's oldest continuously inhabited cities.[12] Situated along the Hrazdan River, Yerevan
Yerevan
is the administrative, cultural, and industrial center of the country. It has been the capital since 1918, the thirteenth in the history of Armenia, and the seventh located in or around the Ararat plain
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Medes
The Medes[N 1] (/miːdz/, Old Persian
Old Persian
Māda-, Ancient Greek: Μῆδοι, Hebrew: מָדַי‬) were an ancient Iranian people[N 2] who lived in an area known as Media (northwestern Iran) and who spoke the Median language. At around 1100 to 1000 BC, they inhabited the mountainous area of northwestern Iran
Iran
and the northeastern and eastern region of Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
and located in the Hamadan
Hamadan
(Ecbatana) region.[5] Their emergence in Iran
Iran
is thought to have occurred between 800 BC and 700 BC, and in the 7th century the whole of western Iran and some other territories were under Median rule
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Orontes I Sakavakyats
Orontes I
Orontes I
Sakavakyats was the first Orontid king of Armenia, reigning in the period between 570 BC – 560 BC. Life[edit]Princess Tigranuhi before wedding with Ajdahak (Astyages)Orontes was called Sakavakyats or "short living" ("short staying"), not because of a short life, but rather because of the short period of his reign, and because he passed the throne to his son Tigranes. Orontes I
Orontes I
had 40,000 infantry and 8,000 cavalry, as well as 3,000 talents (40 kg 800g) of silver with the united weight of 122,400 kg
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Achaemenid Empire
The Achaemenid Empire
Empire
(/əˈkiːmənɪd/ c. 550–330 BC), also called the First Persian Empire,[11] was an empire based in Western Asia, founded by Cyrus the Great. Ranging at its greatest extent from the Balkans
Balkans
and Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
proper in the west to the Indus Valley in the east, it was larger than any previous empire in history, spanning 5.5 million square kilometers. Incorporating various peoples of different origins and faiths, it is notable for its successful model of a centralised, bureaucratic administration (through satraps under the King of Kings), for building infrastructure such as road systems and a postal system, the use of an official language across its territories, and the development of civil services and a large professional army
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Darius I
Darius I
Darius I
(Old Persian: Dārayava(h)uš, New Persian: داریوش‎ Dāryuš; Hebrew: דָּרְיָוֶשׁ‬, Modern Darəyaveš, Tiberian Dāreyāwéš; c. 550–486 BCE) was the fourth king of the Persian Achaemenid Empire
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Orontes I
Yervand I (classical Armenian: Երուանդ Ա, Yervand I) Armenian was a King of the Orontid Dynasty
Dynasty
who reigned during the period between 401 BC – 344 BC. The Persian version of the name is Auruand which meant "Great Warrior" in the Avestan language. It is likely this was a special title given by the Persian king to a chosen Armenian man, though this seems to have become a hereditary title in that family. Biography[edit] According to the Greek sources (Herodotus, Strabo) Orontes was made Satrap
Satrap
of Sophene
Sophene
and Matiene
Matiene
(Mitanni).[1] Orontes I
Orontes I
had at least 3,000 talents of silver. He was given these Satrapies after the Battle of Cunaxa
Battle of Cunaxa
in 401 BC for supporting Artaxerxes II
Artaxerxes II
against Cyrus the Younger
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Hakkâri Province
Hakkâri
Hakkâri
Province (Turkish: Hakkâri
Hakkâri
ili), is a province in the south east corner of Turkey. The administrative centre is located in the city of Hakkâri
Hakkâri
(Kurdish: Colemêrg‎). The province covers an area of 7,121 km² and has a population of 251,302 (2010 est). The province had a population of 236,581 in 2000. The province was created in 1936 out of part of Van Province. Its adjacent provinces are Şırnak to the west and Van to the north
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Alexander The Great
Alexander
Alexander
III of Macedon
Macedon
(20/21 July 356 BC – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as Alexander
Alexander
the Great (Ancient Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος ὁ Μέγας, translit. Aléxandros ho Mégas, Koine
Koine
Greek: [a.lék.san.dros ho mé.gas]), was a king (basileus) of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon[a] and a member of the Argead
Argead
dynasty. He was born in Pella
Pella
in 356 BC and succeeded his father Philip II to the throne at the age of twenty
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