HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Time-lapse Photography
Time-lapse photography
Time-lapse photography
is a technique whereby the frequency at which film frames are captured (the frame rate) is much lower than that used to view the sequence. When played at normal speed, time appears to be moving faster and thus lapsing. For example, an image of a scene may be captured once every second, then played back at 30 frames per second; the result is an apparent 30 times speed increase. In a similar manner, film can also be played at a much lower rate than it was captured at, slowing down fast action, as slow motion or high-speed photography. Processes that would normally appear subtle to the human eye, e.g. the motion of the sun and stars in the sky or plant growth, become very pronounced. Time-lapse is the extreme version of the cinematography technique of undercranking
[...More...]

"Time-lapse Photography" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Neutral Density Filter
In photography and optics, a neutral-density filter, or ND filter, is a filter that reduces or modifies the intensity of all wavelengths, or colors, of light equally, giving no changes in hue of color rendition. It can be a colorless (clear) or grey filter. The purpose of a standard photographic neutral-density filter is to reduce the amount of light entering the lens. Doing so allows the photographer to select combinations of aperture, exposure time and sensor sensitivity that would otherwise produce overexposed pictures. This is done to achieve effects such as a shallower depth of field or motion blur of a subject in a wider range of situations and atmospheric conditions. For example, one might wish to photograph a waterfall at a slow shutter speed to create a deliberate motion-blur effect. The photographer might determine that to obtain the desired effect, a shutter speed of ten seconds was needed
[...More...]

"Neutral Density Filter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

CBS
CBS
CBS
(an initialism of the network's former name, the Columbia Broadcasting System) is an American English language
English language
commercial broadcast television network that is a flagship property of CBS Corporation. The company is headquartered at the CBS Building
CBS Building
in New York City with major production facilities and operations in New York City (at the CBS
CBS
Broadcast Center) and Los Angeles (at CBS
CBS
Television City and the CBS
CBS
Studio Center). CBS
CBS
is sometimes referred to as the "Eye Network", in reference to the company's iconic logo, in use since 1951. It has also been called the "Tiffany Network", alluding to the perceived high quality of CBS programming during the tenure of William S
[...More...]

"CBS" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Discovery HD
Discovery HD is the international name of the high-definition television channels from Discovery Communications. The international Discovery HD (now Discovery HD World in Asia-Pacific markets)[1] first launched in Korea on February 2005 as a programming block
[...More...]

"Discovery HD" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Todd-AO
Todd-AO
Todd-AO
is an American post-production company founded in 1953, providing sound-related services to the motion picture and television industries. The company operates three facilities in the Los Angeles area. Todd-AO
Todd-AO
is also the name of the widescreen, 70 mm film format that was developed by Mike Todd
Mike Todd
and the American Optical Company in the mid-1950s. Todd-AO
Todd-AO
had been founded to promote and distribute this system.Contents1 History1.1 Todd-AO
Todd-AO
process 1.2 Curved screen vs
[...More...]

"Todd-AO" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

70 Mm Film
70 mm film (or 65 mm film) is a wide high-resolution film gauge for still and motion picture photography, with higher resolution than the standard 35 mm motion picture film format. As used in cameras, the film is 65 mm (2.6 in) wide. For projection, the original 65 mm film is printed on 70 mm (2.8 in) film. The additional 5 mm are for four magnetic strips holding six tracks of stereophonic sound. Although later 70 mm prints use digital sound encoding, the vast majority of existing and surviving 70 mm prints predate this technology. Each frame is five perforations tall, with an aspect ratio of 2.20:1
[...More...]

"70 Mm Film" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Topophilia
Topophilia (From Greek topos "place" and -philia, "love of"[1]) is a strong sense of place, which often becomes mixed with the sense of cultural identity among certain people and a love of certain aspects of such a place.Contents1 History of the term 2 In relation to local sports 3 Use in the media 4 Dark side 5 See also 6 Footnotes 7 External linksHistory of the term[edit] Alan Watts's autobiography, In My Own Way (1972), starts with the sentence: "Topophilia is a word invented by the British poet John Betjeman for a special love for peculiar places." But it was W. H. Auden who used the term in his 1948 introduction to John Betjeman's poetry book Slick but Not Streamlined, stressing that the term "has little in common with nature love" but depended upon a landscape infused with a sense of history.[2] The term later appeared in the French philosopher Gaston Bachelard's highly influential The Poetics of Space (1958)
[...More...]

"Topophilia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Television
Television
Television
(TV) is a telecommunication medium used for transmitting moving images in monochrome (black and white), or in colour, and in two or three dimensions and sound. The term can refer to a television set, a television program ("TV show"), or the medium of television transmission. Television
Television
is a mass medium for advertising, entertainment and news. Television
Television
became available in crude experimental forms in the late 1920s, but it would still be several years before the new technology would be marketed to consumers. After World War II, an improved form of black-and-white TV broadcasting became popular in the United States and Britain, and television sets became commonplace in homes, businesses, and institutions
[...More...]

"Television" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Peter Greenaway
Peter Greenaway, CBE (born 5 April 1942 in Newport, Wales) is a British film director, screenwriter, and artist. His films are noted for the distinct influence of Renaissance and Baroque painting, and Flemish painting
Flemish painting
in particular. Common traits in his film are the scenic composition and illumination and the contrasts of costume and nudity, nature and architecture, furniture and people, sexual pleasure and painful death.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 1962–1999 2.2 2000–present 2.3 Nine Classical Paintings Revisited3 Films 4 Exhibitions 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Greenaway was born in Newport, Monmouthshire, Wales,[1] to a teacher mother and a builder's merchant father.[2] Greenaway's family left South Wales when he was three years old (they had moved there originally to avoid the Blitz) and settled in Chingford, Essex (later to become part of greater London)
[...More...]

"Peter Greenaway" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

A Zed & Two Noughts
A Zed & Two Noughts is a 1985 film written and directed by Peter Greenaway. This film was Greenaway's first with cinematography by Sacha Vierny, who went on to shoot virtually all of Greenaway's work in the 1980s and 1990s, until Vierny's death; Greenaway referred to Vierny as his "most important collaborator".[1] The film is a rumination on life, love, bad sex, doubling, man's mistreatment of animals, artifice vs. the life force and the inevitability of birth, death and decay.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Reception 4 Soundtrack4.1 Track listing5 References 6 External linksPlot[edit] Twin zoologists Oswald and Oliver Deuce ( Brian Deacon and Eric Deacon) are at work studying the behaviour of animals at a zoo, when their wives are killed in a car accident involving a large swan which crashes through the car windscreen
[...More...]

"A Zed & Two Noughts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Michael Nyman
Michael Laurence Nyman, CBE (born 23 March 1944) is an English composer of minimalist music, pianist, librettist and musicologist, known for numerous film scores (many written during his lengthy collaboration with the filmmaker Peter Greenaway), and his multi-platinum soundtrack album to Jane Campion's The Piano. He has written a number of operas, including The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat; Letters, Riddles and Writs; Noises, Sounds & Sweet Airs; Facing Goya; Man and Boy: Dada; Love Counts; and Sparkie: Cage and Beyond. He has written six concerti, five string quartets, and many other chamber works, many for his Michael Nyman
Michael Nyman
Band. He is also a performing pianist
[...More...]

"Michael Nyman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Early Edition
Early Edition
Early Edition
is an American television drama series that aired on CBS broadcast network from September 28, 1996 to May 27, 2000. Set in the city of Chicago, Illinois, it follows the adventures of a man who mysteriously receives each Chicago Sun-Times
Chicago Sun-Times
newspaper the day before it is actually published, and who uses this knowledge to prevent terrible events every day. Created by Ian Abrams, Patrick Q. Page, and Vik Rubenfeld, the series starred actor Kyle Chandler
Kyle Chandler
as Gary Hobson, and featured many real Chicago locations over the course of the series' run. Despite fan efforts to save the show, it was cancelled in May 2000, and it began airing in syndication on Fox Family Channel that same month
[...More...]

"Early Edition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Non-narrative Film
Non-narrative film is an aesthetic of cinematic film that does not narrate, or relate "an event, whether real or imaginary". The aesthetic is non-representational. Narrative film is the dominant aesthetic, though non-narrative film is not fully distinct from that aesthetic. While the non-narrative film avoids "certain traits" of the narrative film, it "still retains a number of narrative characteristics"
[...More...]

"Non-narrative Film" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mike Jittlov
Mike Jittlov (born June 8, 1948) is an American animator and the creator of short films and one feature-length film using forms of special effects animation, including stop-motion animation, rotoscoping, and pixilation. He is best known for the 1989 feature-length film The Wizard of Speed and Time, based on his 1979 short film of the same name.[1] Life[edit] Born in Los Angeles, Jittlov became a math-language major at UCLA. Jittlov took an animation course to satisfy his art requirement. He made a super-8 film, The Leap, enlarged to 16mm to participate in film festivals in the early 70s. Jittlov entered a 16mm film made for his UCLA class, Good Grief[2], into Academy Awards competition
[...More...]

"Mike Jittlov" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Silent Film
A silent film is a film with no synchronized recorded sound (and in particular, no spoken dialogue). In silent films for entertainment, dialogue is conveyed by the use of muted gestures and mime in conjunction with title cards, written indications of the plot and key dialogue lines. The idea of combining motion pictures with recorded sound is nearly as old as film itself, but because of the technical challenges involved, the introduction of synchronized dialogue became practical only in the late 1920s in film with the perfection of the Audion amplifier tube
Audion amplifier tube
and the advent of the Vitaphone
Vitaphone
system
[...More...]

"Silent Film" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Point-and-shoot Camera
A point-and-shoot camera, also known as compact camera, is a still camera designed primarily for simple operation.[1] Most use focus free lenses or autofocus for focusing, automatic systems for setting the exposure options, and have flash units built in. Point-and-shoots are by far the best selling type of separate camera, as distinct from camera phones. They are popular for vernacular photography by people who do not consider themselves photographers but want easy-to-use cameras for snapshots of vacations, parties, reunions and other events. Point-and-shoot camera
Point-and-shoot camera
sales declined after about 2010 as smartphones overtook them in such uses. Most superzoom compact cameras have between 30x and 60x optical zoom, although some have even further zoom, most notably the Nikon P900, which has 83x optical zoom, and weigh less than 300 grams, much less than bridge cameras and DSLRs
[...More...]

"Point-and-shoot Camera" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.