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Tiki-taka
Tiki-taka
Tiki-taka
(commonly spelled tiqui-taca [ˈtikiˈtaka] in Spanish) is a style of play in football characterised by short passing and movement, working the ball through various channels, and maintaining possession. The style is primarily associated with La Liga
La Liga
club Barcelona, especially during the era of manager Pep Guardiola
Pep Guardiola
- however Guardiola distanced himself from the style stating his view that "I loathe all that passing for the sake of it".[1] Its development and influence goes back to Johan Cruyff's tenure as manager in the early 1990s all the way to the present. Tiki-Taka methods were eventually perfected in the Spanish national team by the managers Luis Aragonés
Luis Aragonés
and Vicente del Bosque
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FIFA World Cup
The FIFA
FIFA
World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football
Football
Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The current champion is France, which won its second title at the 2018 tournament in Russia. The current format of the competition involves a qualification phase, which currently takes place over the preceding three years, to determine which teams qualify for the tournament phase, which is often called the World Cup Finals
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Jed Davies
Jed Davies (born 6 January 1988) is a Welsh[1] professional football coach, who works for Ottawa Fury as a first team assistant coach.Contents1 Coaching career1.1 Clubs and National Teams 1.2 Coach Education 1.3 Published Books2 ReferencesCoaching career[edit] Clubs and National Teams[edit] Davies worked at Oxford University A.F.C[2][3] alongside Mickey Lewis and Jon Collins from 2013 to 2014 before going on to work with Magnus Pehrsson, Manager of the Estonia national football team from 2015.[4][5][6][7] On 9 August 2016, Davies was hired by Ottawa Fury F.C
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Lionel Messi
Argentine professional footballerInternational goals Career achievements Comparisons to Cristiano RonaldoFilmsMessi (2014) Messi (2017)v t eLionel Andrés Messi Cuccittini[note 1] (Spanish pronunciation: [ljoˈnel anˈdɾez ˈmesi] ( listen);[A] born 24 June 1987) is an Argentine professional footballer who plays as a forward for Spanish club Barcelona and the Argentina
Argentina
national team. Often considered the best player in the world and regarded by many as the greatest of all time,[5] Messi has a record-tying five Ballon d'Or
Ballon d'Or
awards,[note 2] four of which he won consecutively, and a record-tying four European Golden Shoes
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Offside (association Football)
Offside is one of the laws of association football, codified in Law 11 of the Laws of the Game. The law states that a player is in an offside position if any of their body part except the hands and arms is in the opponents' half of the pitch and closer to the opponents' goal line than both the ball and the second-last opponent [1](not necessarily the goalkeeper). Being in an offside position is not an offence in itself; a player who was in an offside position at the moment the ball last touched, or was played by a team mate, must then become involved in active play in the opinion of the referee, in order for an offence to occur
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Centre-forward
Forwards are the players on an association football team who play nearest to the opposing team's goal, and are therefore most responsible for scoring goals. Their advanced position and limited defensive responsibilities mean forwards normally score more goals on behalf of their team than other players. Modern team formations generally include one to three forwards; for example, the common 4–2–3–1 formation includes one forward.[1] Unconventional formations may include more than three forwards, or none.[2][3]Contents1 Centre-forward 2 Striker 3 Second striker 4 Inside forward 5 Outside forward 6 Winger 7 False 9 8 Strike teams and combinations 9 See also 10 ReferencesCentre-forward[edit] The traditional role of a centre-forward is to score the majority of goals on behalf of the team
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False Nine
Forwards are the players on an association football team who play nearest to the opposing team's goal, and are therefore most responsible for scoring goals. Their advanced position and limited defensive responsibilities mean forwards normally score more goals on behalf of their team than other players. Modern team formations generally include one to three forwards; for example, the common 4–2–3–1 formation includes one forward.[1] Unconventional formations may include more than three forwards, or none.[2][3]Contents1 Centre-forward 2 Striker 3 Second striker 4 Inside forward 5 Outside forward 6 Winger 7 False 9 8 Strike teams and combinations 9 See also 10 ReferencesCentre-forward[edit] The traditional role of a centre-forward is to score the majority of goals on behalf of the team
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Full Back (association Football)
In the sport of association football, a defender is an outfield player whose primary role is to prevent the opposing team from scoring goals. There are four types of defenders: centre-back, sweeper, full-back, and wing-back. The centre-back and full-back positions are essential in most modern formations
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Midfielder
A midfielder is an association football position.[1] Midfielders are generally positioned on the field between their team's defenders and forwards. Some midfielders play a disciplined defensive role, breaking up attacks, and are otherwise known as defensive midfielders. Others blur the boundaries, being more mobile and efficient in passing: they are commonly referred to as deep-lying midfielders, play-makers, box-to-box, or holding midfielders. The number of midfielders on a team and their assigned roles depends on the team's formation; the collective group of these players on the field is sometimes referred to as the midfield.[2] Most managers assign at least one midfielder to disrupt the opposing team's attacks, while others may be tasked with creating goals, or have equal responsibilities between attack and defence. Midfielders are the players who typically travel the greatest distance during a match
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Goalkeeper (association Football)
Goalkeeper, often shortened to keeper or goalie, is one of the major positions of association football. It is the most specialised position in the sport. The goalkeeper's primary role is to prevent the opposing team from successfully moving the ball over the defended goal-line (between the posts and under the crossbar). This is accomplished by the goalkeeper moving into the path of the ball and either catching it or directing it away from the vicinity of the goal line. Within the penalty area goalkeepers are able to use their hands, making them (outside throw-ins) the only players on the field permitted to handle the ball. The back pass rule prevents goalkeepers handling direct passes back to them from teammates. Goalkeepers usually perform goal kicks, and also give commands to their defense during corner kicks, direct and indirect free kicks, and marking
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Raphael Honigstein
Raphael Honigstein, a native of Bavaria, is a German journalist and author.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Journalism career 3 Broadcasting 4 Publications 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] In 1993, Honigstein moved from Munich to London.[2] He studied law before becoming a journalist.[3] Journalism career[edit] In the 1990s, Honigstein wrote about pop culture for the German youth magazine jetzt. Honigstein is the English football correspondent for the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung, and German football correspondent for the British newspaper The Guardian
The Guardian
and the UK radio broadcaster, talkSPORT
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2010 FIFA World Cup
The 2010 FIFA World Cup
FIFA World Cup
was the 19th FIFA
FIFA
World Cup, the world championship for men's national association football teams. It took place in South Africa
South Africa
from 11 June to 11 July 2010. The bidding process for hosting the tournament finals was open only to African nations. In 2004, the international football federation, FIFA, selected South Africa over Egypt and Morocco
Morocco
to become the first African nation to host the finals.[citation needed] The matches were played in 10 stadiums in nine host cities around the country,[5] with the opening and final played at the Soccer City stadium in South Africa's largest city, Johannesburg.[6][7] Thirty-two teams were selected for participation[8] via a worldwide qualification tournament that began in August 2007
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University Of Oxford
Coordinates: 51°45′40″N 1°15′12″W / 51.7611°N 1.2534°W / 51.7611; -1.2534University of OxfordCoat of armsLatin: Universitas OxoniensisMotto Dominus Illuminatio Mea (Latin)Motto in English"The Lord is my Light"Established c. 1096; 922 years ago (1096)[1]Endowment £5.069 billion (inc
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FIFA World Cup 2010
The 2010 FIFA World Cup
FIFA World Cup
was the 19th FIFA
FIFA
World Cup, the world championship for men's national association football teams. It took place in South Africa
South Africa
from 11 June to 11 July 2010. The bidding process for hosting the tournament finals was open only to African nations. In 2004, the international football federation, FIFA, selected South Africa over Egypt and Morocco
Morocco
to become the first African nation to host the finals.[citation needed] The matches were played in 10 stadiums in nine host cities around the country,[5] with the opening and final played at the Soccer City stadium in South Africa's largest city, Johannesburg.[6][7] Thirty-two teams were selected for participation[8] via a worldwide qualification tournament that began in August 2007
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Valeriy Lobanovskyi
Valeriy Vasylyovych Lobanovskyi (Ukrainian: Вале́рій Васи́льович Лобано́вський, Valerij Vasyl’ovyč Lobanovs’kyj [vɑˈlɛrɪj lobɑˈnɔwsʲkɪj]; Russian: Вале́рий Васи́льевич Лобано́вский, Valeriy Vasilyevich Lobanovskiy [vɐˈlʲerʲɪj vɐˈsʲilʲɪvʲɪtɕ ɫəbɐˈnofskʲɪj]; 6 January 1939 – 13 May 2002) was a Soviet-Ukrainian football manager. He was the Master of Sports of USSR, the Distinguished Coach of USSR, and the laureate of the UEFA
UEFA
Ruby Order (2002) and FIFA Order of Merit, the highest honour awarded by FIFA.[1][2] Lobanovskyi is most famous for his spells managing FC Dynamo Kyiv, the Ukraine
Ukraine
national football team, and earlier the USSR national football team
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Xabi Alonso
Xabier "Xabi" Alonso Olano (Basque: [ˈʃaβi aˈlons̺o oˈlano], Spanish: [ˈ(t)ʃaβj aˈlonso oˈlano]; born 25 November 1981) is a Spanish former footballer who played as a central midfielder. Alonso began his career at Real Sociedad, the main team of his home province Gipuzkoa. After a brief loan period at Eibar, he was appointed as team captain of Real Socieded by then-manager John Toshack. He succeeded in the role, taking the club to second place in the 2002–03 season. He moved to Liverpool
Liverpool
in August 2004 for £10.5 million and won the UEFA Champions League
UEFA Champions League
in his first season, under manager Rafael Benítez, scoring the equalising goal in the Final against Milan
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