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Thousand Oaks, California
THOUSAND OAKS is the second-largest city in Ventura County, California
California
, United States. It is in the northwestern part of the Greater Los Angeles Area
Greater Los Angeles Area
, approximately 35 miles (56 km) from Downtown Los Angeles
Downtown Los Angeles
and is less than 15 mi (24 km) from the Los Angeles city neighborhood of Woodland Hills . It was named after the many oak trees that grow in the area, and the city seal is adorned with an oak. The city forms the central populated core of the Conejo Valley
Conejo Valley
. Thousand Oaks was incorporated in 1964, but has since expanded to the west and east
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Daylight Saving Time
DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME (abbreviated DST), also sometimes erroneously referred to as DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME, is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to standard time. American inventor and politician Benjamin Franklin proposed a form of daylight time in 1784. He wrote an essay "An Economical Project for Diminishing the Cost of Light" to the editor of _The Journal of Paris _, suggesting, somewhat jokingly, that Parisians could economize candle usage by getting people out of bed earlier in the morning, making use of the natural morning light instead. New Zealander George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895
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UTC−7
UTC−07:00 is a time offset that subtracts 7 hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). In North America, it is observed in the Mountain Time Zone during standard time , and in the Pacific Time Zone
Pacific Time Zone
during the other 8 months (see Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
). A few places use it year-round
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ZIP Code
ZIP CODES are a system of postal codes used by the United States Postal Service since 1963. The term _ZIP_, an acronym for _Zone Improvement Plan_, was chosen to suggest that the mail travels more efficiently, and therefore more quickly (zipping along), when senders use the code in the postal address . The basic format consists of five digits . An extended 'ZIP+4' code, introduced in 1983, includes the five digits of the ZIP Code, a hyphen , and four additional digits that determine a more specific location within a given ZIP Code. The term _ZIP Code_ was originally registered as a servicemark by the U.S. Postal Service, but its registration has since expired. USPS style for _ZIP_ is all caps and the "C" in "Code" is also capitalized, although style sheets for some publications use sentence case or lowercase
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Pacific Time Zone
The PACIFIC TIME ZONE observes standard time by subtracting eight hours from Coordinated Universal Time ( UTC−8 ). During daylight saving time , its time offset is UTC−7 and is thus based on the mean solar time of the 105th meridian west of the Greenwich Observatory . In the United States and Canada, this time zone is generically called the PACIFIC TIME ZONE (PT). Specifically, it uses PACIFIC STANDARD TIME (PST) when observing standard time (late autumn to early spring), and PACIFIC DAYLIGHT TIME (PDT) when observing daylight saving time (early spring to late autumn). Most of Canada uses daylight saving time . In Mexico , the UTC−8 time zone is known as the _NORTHWEST TIME ZONE_, which is synchronized with the U.S. PDT daylight saving schedule. The largest city in the Pacific Time Zone is Los Angeles ; the city's metropolitan area is the largest in the zone
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Time Zone
A TIME ZONE is a region of the globe that observes a uniform standard time for legal, commercial, and social purposes. Timezones tend to follow the boundaries of countries and their subdivisions because it is convenient for areas in close commercial or other communication to keep the same time. Most of the time zones on land are offset from Coordinated Universal Time(UTC) by a whole number of hours ( UTC−12to UTC+14), but a few zones are offset by 30 or 45 minutes (for example Newfoundland Standard Timeis UTC−03:30, NepalStandard Timeis UTC+05:45, and Indian Standard Timeis UTC+05:30). Some higher latitude and temperate zone countries use daylight saving time for part of the year, typically by adjusting local clock time by an hour. Many land time zones are skewed toward the west of the corresponding nautical time zones . This also creates a permanent daylight saving time effect
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Democratic Party (United States)
The DEMOCRATIC PARTY is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States
United States
, along with the Republican Party (GOP). Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison
James Madison
's Democratic-Republican Party
Democratic-Republican Party
, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson
Andrew Jackson
, making it the world's oldest political party. The Democrats' dominant worldview was once social conservatism and economic liberalism , while—especially in the rural South —populism was its leading characteristic
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2010 United States Census
The 2010 UNITED STATES CENSUS, (known as "CENSUS 2010"), is the twenty-third and currently most recent United States national census . National Census Day , the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired. The population of the United States was counted as 308,745,538, a 9.7% increase from the 2000 Census . CONTENTS * 1 Introduction * 2 Major changes * 3 Cost * 4 Technology * 5 Marketing and undercounts * 6 Reapportionment * 7 Controversies * 7.1 _Clemons v. Department of Commerce_ * 8 State rankings * 9 Metropolitan rankings * 10 City rankings * 11 References * 12 External links INTRODUCTION President Obama completing his census form in the Oval Office on March 29, 2010. As required by the United States Constitution , the U.S. census has been conducted every 10 years since 1790
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Telephone Numbering Plan
A TELEPHONE NUMBERING PLAN is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunication to assign telephone numbers to subscriber telephones or other telephony endpoints. Telephone numbers are the addresses of participants in a telephone network, reachable by a system of destination code routing. Telephone numbering plans are defined in each of administrative regions of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) and they are also present in private telephone networks. Numbering plans may follow a variety of design strategies which have often arisen from the historical evolution of individual telephone networks and local requirements. A broad division is commonly recognized, distinguishing open numbering plans and closed numbering plans. A closed numbering plan imposes a fixed number of digits assigned to every telephone, while an open numbering plan features a variable length of telephone numbers assigned to stations
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Federal Information Processing Standard
FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARDS (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the United States federal government for use in computer systems by non-military government agencies and government contractors. FIPS standards are issued to establish requirements for various purposes such as ensuring computer security and interoperability, and are intended for cases in which suitable industry standards do not already exist. Many FIPS specifications are modified versions of standards used in the technical communities, such as the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). CONTENTS * 1 Specific areas of FIPS standardization * 2 Data security standards * 3 Withdrawal of geographic codes * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links SPECIFIC AREAS OF FIPS STANDARDIZATIONThe U.S
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Uniform Crime Reports
The UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS (UCR) compiles official data on crime in the United States
United States
, published by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). UCR is "a nationwide, cooperative statistical effort of nearly 18,000 city, university and college, county, state, tribal , and federal law enforcement agencies voluntarily reporting data on crimes brought to their attention". Crime statistics are compiled from UCR data and published annually by the FBI
FBI
in the Crime in the United States
United States
series. The FBI
FBI
does not collect the data itself. Rather, law enforcement agencies across the United States
United States
provide the data to the FBI, which then compiles the Reports
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Pictograph
A PICTOGRAM, also called a PICTOGRAMME, PICTOGRAPH, or simply picto, and in computer usage an icon , is an ideogram that conveys its meaning through its pictorial resemblance to a physical object. Pictographs are often used in writing and graphic systems in which the characters are to a considerable extent pictorial in appearance. A pictogram may also be used in subjects such as leisure, tourism and geography. Pictography is a form of writing which uses representational, pictorial drawings , similarly to cuneiform and, to some extent, hieroglyphic writing , which also uses drawings as phonetic letters or determinative rhymes. Some pictograms, such as Hazards pictograms , are elements of formal languages . Pictograph has a rather different meaning in the field of prehistoric art , including recent art by traditional societies. Here it means art painted on rock surfaces, as opposed to petroglyphs that are carved or incised
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Satwiwa
SATWIWA (Chumash for "the bluffs") was a former Chumash village just north of Big Sycamore Canyon in southern Newbury Park . Located adjacent to Rancho Sierra Vista within the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area , it is one of the four primary entrances to the Santa Monica Mountains
Santa Monica Mountains
National Recreation Area. The SATWIWA NATIVE AMERICAN INDIAN CULTURE CENTER is operated by the National Park Service in cooperation with the Friends of Satwiwa. The Ventureño Chumash Indians first settled in Satwiwa
Satwiwa
13,000 years ago, and lived in the village as recently as 2,000 years ago
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Seal (emblem)
A SEAL is a device for making an impression in wax , clay, paper, or some other medium, including an embossment on paper, and is also the impression thus made. The original purpose was to authenticate a document, a wrapper for one such as a modern envelope, or the cover of a container or package holding valuables or other objects. The seal-making device is also referred to as the seal matrix or die; the imprint it creates as the SEAL IMPRESSION (or, more rarely, the sealing). If the impression is made purely as a relief resulting from the greater pressure on the paper where the high parts of the matrix touch, the seal is known as a dry seal; in other cases ink or another liquid or liquefied medium is used, in another color than the paper. In most traditional forms of dry seal the design on the seal matrix is in intaglio (cut below the flat surface) and therefore the design on the impressions made is in relief (raised above the surface)
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Oak
See List of _Quercus_ species An OAK is a tree or shrub in the genus _QUERCUS_ (/ˈkwɜːrkəs/ ; Latin "oak tree") of the beech family, Fagaceae . There are approximately 600 extant species of oaks . The common name "oak" also appears in the names of species in related genera, notably _ Lithocarpus _ (stone oaks), as well as in those of unrelated species such as _ Grevillea robusta _ (silky oaks) and the Casuarinaceae (she-oaks). The genus _Quercus_ is native to the Northern Hemisphere , and includes deciduous and evergreen species extending from cool temperate to tropical latitudes in the Americas , Asia , Europe , and North Africa . North America contains the largest number of oak species, with approximately 90 occurring in the United States, while Mexico has 160 species of which 109 are endemic
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Geographic Names Information System
The GEOGRAPHIC NAMES INFORMATION SYSTEM (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer . GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names. The database is part of a system that includes topographic map names and bibliographic references. The names of books and historic maps that confirm the feature or place name are cited. Variant names, alternatives to official federal names for a feature, are also recorded. Each feature receives a permanent, unique feature record identifier, sometimes called the GNIS identifier
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