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Thomas Hobbes
Thomas Hobbes
Thomas Hobbes
(/hɒbz/; 5 April 1588 – 4 December 1679), in some older texts Thomas Hobbes
Thomas Hobbes
of Malmesbury,[2] was an English philosopher who is considered one of the founders of modern political philosophy.[3][4] Hobbes is
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English People
The English are a nation and an ethnic group native to England
England
who speak the English language. The English identity is of early medieval origin, when they were known in Old English
Old English
as the Angelcynn ("family of the Angles"). Their ethnonym is derived from the Angles, one of the Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
who migrated to Great Britain
Great Britain
around the 5th century AD.[7] England
England
is one of the countries of the United Kingdom, and the majority of people living there are British citizens. Historically, the English population is descended from several peoples — the earlier Celtic Britons (or Brythons) and the Germanic tribes that settled in Britain following the withdrawal of the Romans, including Angles, Saxons, Jutes
Jutes
and Frisians
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Materialism
Materialism
Materialism
is a form of philosophical monism which holds that matter is the fundamental substance in nature, and that all things, including mental aspects and consciousness, are results of material interactions. In Idealism, mind and consciousness are first-order realities to which matter is subject and secondary. In philosophical materialism the converse is true. Here mind and consciousness are by-products or epiphenomena of material processes (the biochemistry of the human brain and nervous system, for example) without which they cannot exist. According to this doctrine the material creates and determines consciousness, not vice versa. Materialists believe that Matter
Matter
and the physical laws that govern it constitute the most reliable guide to the nature of mind and consciousness. Materialist theories are mainly divided into three groups
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Gas
Gas
Gas
is one of the four fundamental states of matter (the others being solid, liquid, and plasma). A pure gas may be made up of individual atoms (e.g. a noble gas like neon), elemental molecules made from one type of atom (e.g. oxygen), or compound molecules made from a variety of atoms (e.g. carbon dioxide). A gas mixture would contain a variety of pure gases much like the air. What distinguishes a gas from liquids and solids is the vast separation of the individual gas particles. This separation usually makes a colorless gas invisible to the human observer. The interaction of gas particles in the presence of electric and gravitational fields are considered negligible as indicated by the constant velocity vectors in the image. One type of commonly known gas is steam. The gaseous state of matter is found between the liquid and plasma states,[1] the latter of which provides the upper temperature boundary for gases
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Theology
Theology
Theology
is the critical study of the nature of the divine
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Ethics
Ethics
Ethics
or moral philosophy is a branch of philosophy that involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct.[1] The term ethics derives from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
ἠθικός (ethikos), from ἦθος (ethos), meaning 'habit, custom'. The branch of philosophy axiology comprises the sub-branches of ethics and aesthetics, each concerned with values.[2] Ethics
Ethics
seeks to resolve questions of human morality by defining concepts such as good and evil, right and wrong, virtue and vice, justice and crime
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Geometry
Geometry
Geometry
(from the Ancient Greek: γεωμετρία; geo- "earth", -metron "measurement") is a branch of mathematics concerned with questions of shape, size, relative position of figures, and the properties of space. A mathematician who works in the field of geometry is called a geometer. Geometry
Geometry
arose independently in a number of early cultures as a practical way for dealing with lengths, areas, and volumes
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Tacitus
Publius (or Gaius) Cornelius Tacitus
Tacitus
(/ˈtæsɪtəs/; Classical Latin: [ˈtakɪtʊs]; c. 56 – c. 120 AD) was a senator and a historian of the Roman Empire. The surviving portions of his two major works—the Annals and the Histories—examine the reigns of the Roman emperors Tiberius, Claudius, Nero, and those who reigned in the Year of the Four Emperors
Year of the Four Emperors
(69 AD). These two works span the history of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
from the death of Augustus, in 14 AD, to the years of the First Jewish–Roman War, in 70 AD
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Spanish Armada
Decisive Spanish defeat[1][2][3]Militarily indecisive[4][5][6] Spanish invasion failure[7][8] Protestant propaganda victory[9][10]Belligerents Kingdom of England  Dutch Republic Iberian Union
Iberian Union
(Habsburg Spain)Commanders and leaders Lord Howard of Effingham Francis Drake John Hawkins Justinus van Nassau Duke of Medina Sidonia Juan Martínez de Recalde Duke of ParmaStrength34 warships[11] 163 armed merchant vessels (30 over 200 tons)[11] 30 flyboats 22 galleons of
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History
—George Santayana History
History
(from Greek ἱστορία, historia, meaning "inquiry, knowledge acquired by investigation")[2] is the study of the past as it is described in written documents.[3][4] Events occurring before written record are considered prehistory. It is an umbrella term that relates to past events as well as the memory, discovery, collection, organization, presentation, and interpretation of information about these events
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Vicar (Anglicanism)
Vicar is the title given to certain parish priests in the Church of England. It has played a significant role in Anglican Church organisation in ways that are different from other Christian denominations. The title is very old and arises from the medieval situation where priests were appointed either by a secular lord, by a bishop or by a religious foundation. Wherever there is a vicar he shares the benefice with a rector (usually non-resident) to whom the great tithes were paid. Vicar derives from the Latin "vicarius" meaning a substitute. Historically, Anglican parish priests were divided into rectors, vicars and (rarely) perpetual curates. These were distinguished according to the way in which they were appointed and remunerated
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Charlton, Brinkworth
Charlton is a village and civil parish in North Wiltshire, England, about 2 miles (3 km) northeast of Malmesbury
Malmesbury
and 4 miles (6.4 km) northwest of the village of Brinkworth. The parish includes the hamlet of Perry Green and the Charlton Park estate. The 2011 Census recorded the parish population as 425.[1]Contents1 Manor 2 Parish church 3 References 4 Bibliography 5 External linksManor[edit] Two Anglo Saxon charters and the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
of 1086 record land in the parish. Malmesbury
Malmesbury
Abbey held the Manor.[2][3] Parish church[edit] The oldest parts of the Church of England
England
parish church of St John the Baptist include the north arcade, which is late 12th-century. The west tower and north chapel were added in the 13th century. Several new windows were inserted in the 15th century
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Derbyshire
Derbyshire
Derbyshire
(/ˈdɑːrbɪʃər, -ʃɪər/) is a county in the East Midlands of England. A substantial portion of the Peak District National Park lies within Derbyshire, containing the southern extremity of the Pennine range of hills which extend into the north of the county. The county contains part of the National Forest, and borders on Greater Manchester
Greater Manchester
to the northwest, West Yorkshire
West Yorkshire
to the north, South Yorkshire
South Yorkshire
to the northeast, Nottinghamshire
Nottinghamshire
to the east, Leicestershire
Leicestershire
to the southeast, Staffordshire
Staffordshire
to the west and southwest and Cheshire
Cheshire
also to the west
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Sociology
Sociology
Sociology
is the scientific study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and culture.[1][2][3] It is a social science that uses various methods of empirical investigation[4] and critical analysis[5] to develop a body of knowledge about social order, acceptance, and change. Many sociologists aim to conduct research that may be applied directly to social policy and welfare, while others focus primarily on refining the theoretical understanding of social processes. Subject matter ranges from the micro-sociology level of individual agency and interaction to the macro level of systems and the social structure.[6] The traditional focuses of sociology include social stratification, social class, social mobility, religion, secularization, law, sexuality, gender, and deviance
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Wiltshire
2011 Census Excluding Swindon: 93.4% White British 1.3% Asian 1.2% Mixed Race 0.6% Black 0.2% OtherDistricts of Wiltshire   UnitaryDistricts Wiltshire
Wiltshire
( Wiltshire
Wiltshire
Council) Swindon
Swindon
( Swindon
Swindon
Borough Council)Members of Parliament List of MPsPolice Wiltshire
Wiltshire
PoliceTime zone Greenwich Mean Time
Greenwich Mean Time
(UTC) • Summer (DST) British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(UTC+1) Wiltshire
Wiltshire
(/ˈwɪltʃər/ or /-tʃɪər/[1]) is a county in South West England
England
with an area of 3,485 km2 (1,346 square miles).[2] It is landlocked and borders the counties of Dorset, Somerset, Hampshire, Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire
Oxfordshire
and Berkshire
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