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Thirteen Colonies
The Thirteen Colonies, also known as the Thirteen British Colonies[2] or the Thirteen American Colonies,[3] were a group of colonies of Great Britain on the Atlantic coast of America founded in the 17th and 18th centuries which declared independence in 1776 and formed the United States
United States
of America. The Thirteen Colonies had very similar political, constitutional, and legal systems and were dominated by Protestant English-speakers. They were part of Britain's possessions in the New World, which also included colonies in Canada, Florida, and the Caribbean. The colonial population grew from about 2,000 to 2.4 million between 1625 and 1775, displacing American Indians
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History Of The Jews In The United States
The history of the Jews
Jews
in the United States
United States
has been part of the American national fabric since colonial times. Until the 1830s, the Jewish community of Charleston, South Carolina, was the largest in North America. In the late 1800s and the beginning of the 1900s, many Jewish immigrants left from various nations to enter the U.S. as part of the general rise of immigration movements. For example, many German Jews
Jews
arrived in the middle of the 19th century, established clothing stores in towns across the country, formed Reform synagogues, and were active in banking in New York. Immigration of Eastern Yiddish-speaking Ashkenazi Jews, in 1880–1914, brought a large, poor, traditional element to New York City. They were Orthodox or Conservative in religion
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History Of The United States (1918–45)
The history of the United States
United States
from 1918 through 1945 covers the post- World War I
World War I
era, the Great Depression, and World War II. After World War I, the U.S. rejected the Treaty of Versailles
Treaty of Versailles
and did not join the League of Nations. In 1920, the manufacture, sale, import and export of alcohol was prohibited by an amendment to the United States
United States
Constitution. Possession of liquor, and drinking it, was never illegal. The overall level of alcohol consumption did go down, however, state and local governments avoided aggressive enforcement
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Early American Currency
Early American currency
Early American currency
went through several stages of development during the colonial and post-Revolutionary history of the United States. Because few coins were minted in the thirteen colonies that became the United States, foreign coins like the Spanish dollar
Spanish dollar
were widely circulated. Colonial governments sometimes issued paper money to facilitate economic activities. The British Parliament passed Currency Acts in 1751, 1764, and 1773 that regulated colonial paper money. During the American Revolution, the colonies became independent states. Freed from British monetary regulations, they issued paper money to pay for military expenses. The Continental Congress
Continental Congress
also issued paper money during the Revolution, known as Continental currency, to fund the war effort
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Kingdom Of England
Unitary parliamentary monarchy (1215–1707)Monarch •  927–939 Æthelstan
Æthelstan
(first)[a] •  1702–1707 Anne (last)[b]Legislature Parliament •  Upper house House of Lords •  Lower house House of CommonsHistory •  Unification 10th century •  Battle of Hastings 14 October 1066 •  Conquered Wales 1277–1283 •  Incorporated Wales 1535–1542 •  Union of the Crowns 24 March 1603 •  Glorious Revol
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Commodity Money
Commodity
Commodity
money is money whose value comes from a commodity of which it is made. Commodity
Commodity
money consists of objects that have value in themselves (intrinsic value) as well as value in their use as money.[1] Example of commodities that have been used as mediums of exchange include gold, silver, copper, salt, peppercorns, tea, large stones (such as Rai stones), decorated belts, shells, alcohol, cigarettes, cannabis, silk, candy, nails, cocoa beans, cowries and barley
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Prehistory Of The United States
The prehistory of the United States comprises the occurrences within regions now part of the United States of America
United States of America
during the interval of time spanning from the formation of the Earth to the documentation of local history in written form. At the start of the Paleozoic era, what is now "North" America was actually in the southern hemisphere. Marine life flourished in the country's many seas, although terrestrial life had not yet evolved. During the latter part of the Paleozoic, seas were largely replaced by swamps home to amphibians and early reptiles. When the continents had assembled into Pangaea
Pangaea
drier conditions prevailed. The evolutionary precursors to mammals dominated the country until a mass extinction event ended their reign. The Triassic, first period of the Mesozoic era
Mesozoic era
followed
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History Of The United States (1776–89)
Between 1776 and 1789, the United States
United States
of America emerged as an independent country, creating and ratifying its new constitution and establishing its national government. In order to assert their traditional rights, American Patriots seized control of the colonies and launched a war for independence. The Americans declared independence on July 4, 1776, proclaiming "all men are created equal". Congress raised the Continental Army
Continental Army
under the command of General George Washington, forged a military alliance with France and defeated the two main British invasion armies
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History Of The United States (1789–1849)
George Washington, elected the first president in 1789, set up a cabinet form of government, with departments of State, Treasury, and War, along with an Attorney General (the Justice Department was created in 1870). Based in New York, the new government acted quickly to rebuild the nation's financial structure. Enacting the program of Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton, the government assumed the Revolutionary war debts of the states and the national government, and refinanced them with new federal bonds. It paid for the program through new tariffs and taxes; the tax on whiskey led to a revolt in the west; Washington raised an army and suppressed it. The nation adopted a Bill of Rights as 10 amendments to the new constitution. The Judiciary Act of 1789
Judiciary Act of 1789
established the entire federal judiciary, including the Supreme Court
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History Of The United States (1849–65)
Industrialization went forward in the Northwest. A rail network and a telegraph network linked the nation economically, opening up new markets. Immigration brought millions of European workers and farmers to the North. In the South, planters shifted operations (and slaves) from the poor soils of the Southeast to the rich cotton lands of the Southwest. Issues of slavery in the new territories acquired in the War with Mexico
Mexico
(which ended in 1848) were temporarily resolved by the Compromise of 1850. One provision, the Fugitive Slave Law, sparked intense controversy, as revealed in the enormous interest in the plight of the escaped slave in Uncle Tom's Cabin, an anti-slavery novel and play. In 1854, the Kansas–Nebraska Act
Kansas–Nebraska Act
reversed long-standing compromises by providing that each new state of the Union would decide its posture on slavery
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History Of The United States (1945–64)
For the United States
United States
of America, 1945 to 1964 was a time of high economic growth and general prosperity. It was also a time of confrontation as the capitalist United States
United States
and its allies politically opposed the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and other communist countries; the Cold War
Cold War
had begun. African Americans united and organized, and a triumph of the Civil Rights Movement
Civil Rights Movement
ended Jim Crow
Jim Crow
segregation in the South.[1] Further laws were passed that made discrimination illegal and provided federal oversight to guarantee voting rights. Early in the period, an active foreign policy was pursued to assist Western Europe and Asia recover from the devastation of World War II. The Marshall Plan
Marshall Plan
helped Western Europe rebuild from wartime devastation
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List Of Countries By Population
This is a list of countries and dependent territories by population. It includes sovereign states, inhabited dependent territories and, in some cases, constituent countries of sovereign states, with inclusion within the list being primarily based on the ISO standard ISO 3166-1. For instance, the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
is considered as a single entity while the constituent countries of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
Kingdom of the Netherlands
are considered separately. In addition, this list includes certain states with limited recognition not found in ISO 3166-1. The population figures do not reflect the practice of countries that report significantly different populations of citizens domestically and overall
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History Of The United States (1964–80)
The history of the United States
United States
from 1964 through 1980 includes the climax and victory of the Civil Rights Movement; the escalation and ending of the Vietnam War; Second wave feminism; the drama of a generational revolt with its sexual freedoms and use of drugs; and the continuation of the Cold War, with its Space Race
Space Race
to put a man on the Moon. The economy was prosperous and expanding until the recession of 1969-70, then faltered under new foreign competition and the 1973 oil crisis. American society was polarized by the ultimately futile war and by antiwar and antidraft protests, as well as by the shocking Watergate affair, which revealed corruption and gross misconduct at the highest level of government
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History Of The United States (1980–91)
The history of the United States
United States
from 1980 until 1991 includes the last year of the Jimmy Carter
Jimmy Carter
presidency, eight years of the Ronald Reagan administration, and the first three years of the George H. W. Bush presidency, up to the collapse of the Soviet Union. Plagued by the Iran
Iran
hostage crisis, runaway inflation, and mounting domestic opposition, Carter lost the 1980 presidential election to Republican Reagan. In his first term, Reagan introduced expansionary fiscal policies aimed at stimulating the American economy after a recession in 1981 and 1982, including oil deregulation policies which led to the 1980s oil glut. He met with Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev
Mikhail Gorbachev
in four summit conferences, culminating with the signing of the INF Treaty
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African-American History
Origins of the civil rights movement
Origins of the civil rights movement
· Civil rights movement
Civil rights movement
· Black Power movementPost–civil rights era
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History Of Asian Americans
Asian American
Asian American
history is the history of ethnic and racial groups in the United States
United States
who are of Asian descent. Spickard (2007) shows that "'Asian American' was an idea invented in the 1960s to bring together Chinese, Japanese, and Filipino Americans
Filipino Americans
for strategic political purposes
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