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Third Battle Of Panipat
Durrani EmpireSupported by: Nawabs of Oudh Rohillas Maratha
Maratha
EmpireCommanders and leaders Ahmad Shah Durrani
Ahmad Shah Durrani
(Shah of Durrani Empire) Timur Shah Durrani Wazir Wali Khan[2] Shah Pasand Khan[2] Jahan Khan[2] Shuja-ud-Daula Najib-ud-Daula
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Sonepat
Sonipat
Sonipat
also spelled as Sonepat,[2] is a city and a Municipal Corporation in Haryana
Haryana
state of India. It comes under the National Capital Region and is around 43 kilometres (27 mi) from Delhi. It is also around 214 km(128 miles) southwest of Chandigarh, the state capital. The Yamuna River
Yamuna River
runs along the eastern boundary. On 22 December 1972, Sonipat
Sonipat
was carved out of Rohtak
Rohtak
and made a full-fledged district.Contents1 Etymology 2 Ancient history 3 Geography and topography3.1 Blocks in Sonipat4 Climate 5 Demographics 6 Places of interest6.1 Khwaja Khizr Tomb 6.2 Mughal architecture 6.3 Yamuna River 6.4 Food7 Economy7.1 Industrial estates 7.2 Agriculture8 Education8.1 Rajiv Gandhi Education City 8.2 Universities8.2.1 Deenbandhu Chhotu Ram University of Science and Technology 8.2.2 Ashoka University 8.2.3 O.P
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James Forbes (artist)
James Forbes (1749–1819) was a British artist and writer. Born in London to a Scots family, Forbes travelled to India in 1765 as a writer for the British East India Company
British East India Company
and was resident there until 1784. He was a prolific writer and artist and filled 52,000 manuscript pages with notes and sketches concerning all aspects of Indian life, its wildlife, flora and architecture. In 1781 he visited the Taj Mahal
Taj Mahal
and became one of the first Europeans to draw it. After returning to England he married and toured continental Europe extensively until returning to England once more to write Oriental Memoirs
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Doab
Doab
Doab
(from dō, "two" + āb, "water" or "river") is a term used in India
India
and Pakistan
Pakistan
for the "tongue,"[1] or water-rich[2] tract of land lying between two converging, or confluent, rivers. It is similar to an interfluve.[3] In the Oxford Hindi-English Dictionary, R. S. McGregor defines it as "a region lying between and reaching to the confluence of two rivers (esp
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Awadh
 India    NepalStates Uttar Pradesh
Uttar Pradesh
and Province No. 5Divisions Lucknow
Lucknow
division, Faizabad
Faizabad
division, Devipatan division, Kanpur
Kanpur
division, Allahabad
Allahabad
division Nepalgunj
Nepalgunj
divisionLanguages Awadhi dialect of Hindustani ( Hindi
Hindi
and Urdu)Elevation 100 m (300 ft)Gate of the Lal-Baugh at Faizabad; by Thomas and William Daniell, 1801* (BL).Awadh(Urdu: اوَدھ ‬‎), ( pronunciation (help·info)), known in British historical texts as Avadh or Oudh, is a region in the modern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh
Uttar Pradesh
(before independence known as the United Provinces of Agra and Oudh) and a small area of Nepal's Province No. 5
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Zamburak
A zamburak (Persian: زمبورک‎) was a specialized form of self-propelled artillery from the early modern period. The operator of a zamburak is known as a zamburakchi. The weapon was used by the Gunpowder Empires, especially the Iranian empires of the Safavid dynasty and Afsharid dynasty, due to the ruggedness of the Iranian Plateau, which made typical transportation of heavy cannons problematic. The zamburak became a deadly weapon in the eighteenth century. The Pashtuns
Pashtuns
used it to deadly effect in the Battle of Gulnabad, routing a numerically superior imperial Safavid army
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Jezail
The jezail (sometimes Jezzail from the Pashto language) was a simple, cost-efficient and often handmade muzzle-loading long arm commonly used in British India, Central Asia
Central Asia
and parts of the Middle East
Middle East
in the past. Contents1 Features 2 Anglo-Afghan Wars 3 In British literature 4 Contemporary use 5 ReferencesFeatures[edit]Lithograph dated during the First Anglo-Afghan War
First Anglo-Afghan War
of a Kohistani and his jezail.Jezails were generally handmade weapons, and consequently they widely varied in their construction. Jezails were seen as very personal weapons, and unlike the typical military weapons of the time which were very plain and utilitarian, jezails tended to be well crafted and were usually intricately decorated. Jezails tended to have very long barrels
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War Of 27 Years
A year is the orbital period of the Earth
Earth
moving in its orbit around the Sun. Due to the Earth's axial tilt, the course of a year sees the passing of the seasons, marked by changes in weather, the hours of daylight, and, consequently, vegetation and soil fertility. In temperate and subpolar regions around the planet, four seasons are generally recognized: spring, summer, autumn and winter. In tropical and subtropical regions several geographical sectors do not present defined seasons; but in the seasonal tropics, the annual wet and dry seasons are recognized and tracked. The current year is 2018. A calendar year is an approximation of the number of days of the Earth's orbital period as counted in a given calendar. The Gregorian, or modern, calendar, presents its calendar year to be either a common year of 365 days or a leap year of 366 days, as do the Julian calendars; see below
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Baloch People
The Baloch or Baluch (Balochi: بلوچ‬) are a people who live mainly in the Balochistan
Balochistan
region of the southeastern-most edge of the Iranian plateau
Iranian plateau
in Pakistan, Iran, and Afghanistan, as well as in the Arabian Peninsula. They mainly speak the Balochi language, a branch of Northwestern Iranian languages, and are an Iranic people. About 50% of the total Baloch population live in Balochistan, a western province of Pakistan;[8] 40% of Baloch are settled in Sindh; and a significant number of Baloch people
Baloch people
in Punjab of Pakistan. They make up nearly 3.6% of the Pakistani population, about 2% of Iran's population (1.5 million) and about 2% of Afghanistan's population.[9] Baloch people
Baloch people
co-inhabit desert and mountainous regions along with Pashtuns
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Nawab Of Oudh
The Nawab
Nawab
of Awadh
Awadh
or the Nawab
Nawab
of Oudh /ˈaʊd/ was the title of the rulers who governed the state of Awadh
Awadh
(anglicised as Oudh) in north India
India
during the 18th and 19th centuries
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Delhi
Delhi
Delhi
(/ˈdɛli/, Hindustani pronunciation: [d̪ɪlliː] Dilli), officially the National Capital Territory of Delhi
National Capital Territory of Delhi
(NCT), is a city and a union territory of India.[16][17] It is bordered by Haryana
Haryana
on three sides and by Uttar Pradesh
Uttar Pradesh
to the east. The NCT covers an area of 1,484 square kilometres (573 sq mi)
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Suraj Mal
Maharaja Suraj Mal
Suraj Mal
(February 1707 – 25 December 1763) or Sujan Singh was ruler of Bharatpur in Rajasthan, India. A contemporary historian has described him as "the Plato
Plato
of the Jat people" and by a modern writer as the "Jat Odysseus", because of his political sagacity, steady intellect and clear vision.[1] The Jats, under Suraj Mal, overran the Mughal garrison at Agra
Agra
and plundered the city taking with them the two great silver doors of the entrance of the famous Taj Mahal which were then melted down by Suraj Mal
Suraj Mal
in 1763
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Jat
The Jat people
Jat people
( Hindi
Hindi
pronunciation: [dʒaːʈ]) (also spelled Jatt and Jaat)[1][2] are a traditionally agricultural community in Northern India
Northern India
and Pakistan
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Karnal
Karnal
Karnal
( pronunciation (help·info)or the Rice Bowl of India) is a city located in National Capital Region and the headquarters of Karnal District
Karnal District
in the Indian state of Haryana. Karnal
Karnal
is said to have been founded by Karna, a key figure in the epic Mahabharata
Mahabharata
fame, who died at the hands of his half-brother and archrival, Arjuna, and named after him.[2] It was a place of refuge for British survivors of the 1857 Uprising in Delhi.Contents1 Education1.1 Government Schools 1.2 Government Colleges 1.3 Private Schools 1.4 Private Colleges2 Smart City 3 People from Karnal 4 References 5 External linksEducation[edit] Government Schools[edit]Sainik School, KunjpuraGovernment Colleges[edit] Kalpana Chawla
Kalpana Chawla
Government Medical College[3] National Dairy Research Institute. N.D.R.I Govt. P.G
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Kunjpura
Kunjpura is a village in Karnal district, Haryana (prior to 1966 Punjab state), India, about 10 km northeast of Karnal city and about 130 km north of the national capital, Delhi. It is on the right bank (west bank) of the Yamuna River, off the Grand Trunk Road that runs from Amritsar to Delhi and further on to Calcutta.Contents1 Overview 2 Sainik School, Kunjpura 3 People and economy 4 ReferencesOverview[edit] Kunjpura was founded by Nawab Najabat Khan in 1729. Kunjpura village has a fort with a long history. It was a major halting point for those who traveled from Khyber Pass to Delhi before modern metalled roads came to be. In 1739, an Afghan adventurer, Najabat Khan, was granted a chiefdom by Nadir Shah as nawab at Kunjpura. Kunjpura was won by the forces of Maratha Empire in 1761
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Yamuna
The Yamuna
Yamuna
(Hindustani: /jəmʊnaː/), also known as the Jumna, (not to be mistaken with the Jamuna of Bangladesh) is the longest and the second largest tributary river of the Ganges
Ganges
(Ganga) in northern India. Originating from the Yamunotri
Yamunotri
Glacier at a height of 6,387 metres on the south western slopes of Banderpooch peaks in the uppermost region of the Lower Himalaya in Uttarakhand, it travels a total length of 1,376 kilometres (855 mi) and has a drainage system of 366,223 square kilometres (141,399 sq mi), 40.2% of the entire Ganges
Ganges
Basin, before merging with the Ganges
Ganges
at Triveni Sangam, Allahabad, the site for the Kumbha Mela
Kumbha Mela
every twelve years
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