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Theophylact Of Ohrid
Theophylact (Greek: Θεοφύλακτος, Bulgarian: Теофилакт; around 1055–after 1107) was a Greek archbishop of Ohrid
Ohrid
and commentator on the Bible.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Theophylact was born in the mid-11th century at Euripus (Chalcis) in Euboea, at the time part of the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
(now Greece). He became a deacon at Constantinople, attained a high reputation as a scholar, and became the tutor of Constantine Ducas, son of the Emperor Michael VII, for whom he wrote The Education of Princes. In ca. 1078 he moved to Bulgaria where he became the archbishop of Achrida (modern Ohrid).[1] Ohrid
Ohrid
was one of the capital cities of Bulgaria that had been re-conquered by the Byzantines sixty years earlier
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Theophylact, Count Of Tusculum
Theophylact I (before 864 – 924/925) was a medieval Count of Tusculum who was the effective ruler of Rome from around 905 through to his death in 924. His descendants would control the Papacy for the next 100 years.Contents1 Biography 2 Reputation 3 Family tree 4 References 5 NotesBiography[edit] Theophylact was the hereditary Count of Tusculum, a small hill town near the vicinity of Rome. He is mentioned for the first time in a document of 901 as palatine iudex of the Emperor Louis III. He remained in Rome, commanding a group of soldiers after the emperor’s return to Provence in 902, and was prominent in the overthrow of Antipope Christopher in January 904, whom he very likely ordered to be killed whilst in prison later that year
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Pauline Epistles
The Pauline epistles, Epistles of Paul, or Letters of Paul, are the 13 New Testament
New Testament
books which have the name Paul (Παῦλος) as the first word, hence claiming authorship by Paul the Apostle. Among these letters are some of the earliest extant Christian documents. They provide an insight into the beliefs and controversies of early Christianity and as part of the canon of the New Testament
New Testament
they are foundational texts for both Christian theology
Christian theology
and ethics
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Normans
The Normans
Normans
(Norman: Normaunds; French: Normands; Latin: Normanni) were the people who, in the 10th and 11th centuries, gave their name to Normandy, a region in France
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Eastern Orthodox Churches
The Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Church,[1] also known as the Orthodox Church,[2] or officially as the Orthodox Catholic Church,[3] is the second-largest Christian Church, with over 250 million members.[4][5] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and culture of Eastern Europe, Greece
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Serbian Orthodox Church
The Serbian Orthodox Church
Serbian Orthodox Church
(Serbian: Српска православна црква / Srpska pravoslavna crkva) is one of the autocephalous Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Christian Churches. It is the second oldest Slavic Orthodox Church in the world (after the Bulgarian Orthodox Church). The Serbian Orthodox Church
Serbian Orthodox Church
comprises the majority of the population in Serbia, Montenegro, and the Republika Srpska
Republika Srpska
entity of Bosnia and Herzegovina
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Bulgarian Orthodox Church
The Bulgarian Orthodox Church
Orthodox Church
(Bulgarian: Българска православна църква, Balgarska pravoslavna tsarkva) ) is an autocephalous Orthodox Church. It is the oldest Slavic Orthodox Church with some 6.5 million members in the Republic of Bulgaria
Bulgaria
and between 1.5 and 2.0 million members in a number of European countries, the Americas
Americas
and Australia
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Church Of Greece
The Church of Greece
Greece
(Greek: Ἐκκλησία τῆς Ἑλλάδος, Ekklisía tis Elládos [ekliˈsia tis eˈlaðos]), part of the wider Greek Orthodox Church, is one of the autocephalous churches which make up the communion of Orthodox Christianity. Its canonical territory is confined to the borders of Greece
Greece
prior to the Balkan Wars
Balkan Wars
of 1912–1913 ("Old Greece"), with the rest of Greece (the "New Lands", Crete, and the Dodecanese) being subject to the jurisdiction of the Ecumenical Patriarchate
Patriarchate
of Constantinople. However, most of its dioceses are de facto administered as part of the Church of Greece
Greece
for practical reasons, under an agreement between the churches of Athens
Athens
and Constantinople
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Russian Orthodox Church
Coordinates: 55°42′40″N 37°37′45″E / 55.71111°N 37.62917°E / 55.71111; 37.62917Russian Orthodox Church ( Moscow
Moscow
Patriarchate)The Cathedral of Christ the Saviour
Cathedral of Christ the Saviour
in Mosc
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Saint
A saint (also historically known as a hallow) is a person who is recognized as having an exceptional degree of holiness or likeness or closeness to God.[1][2] Depending on the context and denomination, the term also retains its original Christian
Christian
meaning, as any believer who is "in Christ" and in whom Christ
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Gospel
Gospel
Gospel
is the Old English translation of Greek εὐαγγέλιον, evangelion, meaning "good news".[1] It originally meant the Christian message itself, but in the 2nd century it came to be used for the books in which the message was set out.[2][Notes 1] The four gospels of the New Testament
New Testamen

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Acts Of The Apostles
Acts of the Apostles
Apostles
(Ancient Greek: Πράξεις τῶν Ἀποστόλων, Práxeis tôn Apostólōn; Latin: Actūs Apostolōrum), often referred to simply as Acts, is the fifth book of the New Testament; it tells of the founding of the Christian
Christian
church and the spread of its message to the Roman Empire.[1] Acts and the Gospel
Gospel
of Luke make up a two-part work, Luke–Acts, by the same anonymous author, usually dated to around 80–90 AD.[2][3] The first part, the Gospel
Gospel
of Luke, tells how God fulfilled his plan for the world's salvation through the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, the promised Messiah. Acts continues the story of Christianity in the 1st century, beginning with Jesus's Ascension to Heaven
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Minor Prophet
The Minor Prophets or Twelve Prophets (Aramaic: תרי עשר‎, Trei Asar, "The Twelve"), occasionally Book of the Twelve, is the last book of the Nevi'im, the second main division of the Jewish Tanakh. The collection is broken up to form twelve individual books in the Christian Old Testament, one for each of the prophets. The terms "minor prophets" and "twelve prophets" can also refer to the twelve traditional authors of these works. The term "Minor" relates to the length of each book (ranging from a single chapter to fourteen); even the longest is short compared to the three major prophets, Isaiah, Ezekiel and Jeremiah. It is not known when these short works were collected and transferred to a single scroll, but the first extra-biblical evidence we have for the Twelve as a collection is c
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Pechenegs
in Anatolia Artuqid dynasty Saltuqid dynasty in Azerbaijan Ahmadili dynasty Ildenizid dynasty in Egypt Tulunid dynasty Ikhshidid dynasty in Fars Salghurid dynasty in The Levant Burid dynasty Zengid dynastyThis box:view talk editThe Pechenegs
Pechenegs
or Patzinaks[4] were a semi-nomadic Turkic people from Central Asia
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Chrysostom
John Chrysostom
John Chrysostom
(/ˈkrɪsəstəm, krɪˈsɒstəm/; Greek: Ἰωάννης ὁ Χρυσόστομος; c. 349 – 14 September 407),[5] Archbishop
Archbishop
of Constantinople, was an important Early Church Father. He is known for his preaching and public speaking, his denunciation of abuse of authority[6] by both ecclesiastical and political leaders, the Divine Liturgy
Divine Liturgy
of Saint John Chrysostom, and his ascetic sensibilities
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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