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Theological Determinism
Theological determinism
Theological determinism
is a form of determinism which states that all events that happen are pre-ordained, or predestined to happen, by a God, or that they are destined to occur given its omniscience. Theological determinism
Theological determinism
exists in a number of religions, including Judaism, Christianity
Christianity
and Islam
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Nontheism
Nontheism or non-theism is a range of both religious[1] and nonreligious[2] attitudes characterized by the absence of espoused belief in a God
God
or gods. Nontheism has generally been used to describe apathy or silence towards the subject of God
God
and differs from an antithetical, explicit atheism. Nontheism does not necessarily describe atheism or disbelief in God; it has been used as an umbrella term for summarizing various distinct and even mutually exclusive positions, such as agnosticism, ignosticism, ietsism, skepticism, pantheism, atheism, strong or positive atheism, implicit atheism, and apatheism
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Salvation (Christianity)
Salvation
Salvation
in Christianity, or deliverance, is the saving of the soul from sin and its consequences.[1] Variant views on salvation are among the main fault lines dividing the various Christian denominations, being a point of disagreement between Eastern Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism
Roman Catholicism
and Protestantism, as well as within Protestantism, notably in the Calvinist–Arminian debate
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Grace (Christianity)
In Western Christian theology, grace has been defined, not as a created substance of any kind, but as "the love and mercy given to us by God because God desires us to have it, not necessarily because of anything we have done to earn it",[1] "the condescension or benevolence shown by God toward the human race".[2] It is understood by Christians
Christians
to be a spontaneous gift from God to people "generous, free and totally unexpected and undeserved"[3] – that takes the form of divine favor, love, clemency, and a share in the divine life of God.[4] It is an attribute of God that is most manifest in the salvation of sinners
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Bible
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Bible
Bible
(from Koine Greek
Koine Greek
τὰ βιβλία, tà biblía, "the books")[1] is a collection of sacred texts or scriptures that Jews
Jews
and Christians consider to be a product of divine inspiration and a record of the relationship between God and humans. Many different authors contributed to the Bible
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Christian Church
The Christian
Christian
Church is an ecclesiological term generally used by Protestants to refer to the whole group of people belonging to the Christianity
Christianity
throughout history. In this understanding, the "Christian Church" does not refer to a particular Christian denomination
Christian denomination
but to the body of all believers. Some Christian
Christian
traditions, however, believe that the term " Christian
Christian
Church" or "Church" applies only to a specific historic Christian
Christian
body or institution (e.g., the Catholic Church, the Orthodox Church, the Non-Chalcedonian Churches of Oriental Orthodoxy, or the Assyrian Church of the East)
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Desiderius Erasmus
Catholicism portal Philosophy portalv t eDesiderius Erasmus
Erasmus
Roterodamus (/ˌdɛzɪˈdɪəriəs ɪˈræzməs/; 28 October 1466[1][2] – 12 July 1536), known as Erasmus
Erasmus
or Erasmus of Rotterdam,[note 1] was a Dutch Renaissance
Renaissance
humanist, Catholic priest, social critic, teacher, and theologian. Erasmus
Erasmus
was a classical scholar and wrote in a pure Latin style. Among humanists he enjoyed the sobriquet "Prince of the Humanists", and has been called "the crowning glory of the Christian humanists".[3] Using humanist techniques for working on texts, he prepared important new Latin and Greek editions of the New Testament, which raised questions that would be influential in the Protestant Reformation
Protestant Reformation
and Catholic Counter-Reformation
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Martin Luther
Martin Luther, O.S.A. (/ˈluːθər/;[1] German: [ˈmaɐ̯tiːn ˈlʊtɐ] ( listen); 10 November 1483[2] – 18 February 1546) was a German professor of theology, composer, priest, monk,[3] and a seminal figure in the Protestant Reformation. Luther came to reject several teachings and practices of the Roman Catholic Church. He strongly disputed the Catholic view on indulgences. Luther proposed an academic discussion of the practice and efficacy of indulgences in his Ninety-five Theses
Ninety-five Theses
of 1517
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Protestant Reformation
The Reformation, or, more fully, the Protestant
Protestant
Reformation, was a schism in Western Christianity
Christianity
initiated by Martin Luther
Martin Luther
and continued by John Calvin, Huldrych Zwingli, Jacobus Arminius
Jacobus Arminius
and other Protestant Reformers
Protestant Reformers
in 16th-century Europe. It is usually considered to have started with the publication of the Ninety-five Theses
Ninety-five Theses
by Martin Luther
Martin Luther
in 1517 and lasted until the end of the Thirty Years' War in 1648. Although there had been earlier attempts to reform the Catholic Church – such as those of Jan Hus, Peter Waldo, John Wycliffe, and Girolamo Savonarola – Luther is widely acknowledged to have started the Reformation
Reformation
with the Ninety-five Theses
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De Libero Arbitrio Diatribe Sive Collatio
De libero arbitrio diatribe sive collatio
De libero arbitrio diatribe sive collatio
(literally Of free will: Discourses or Comparisons) is the Latin
Latin
title of a polemical work written by Desiderius Erasmus
Desiderius Erasmus
of Rotterdam in 1524
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Adam And Eve
Adam
Adam
and Eve, according to the creation myth of the Abrahamic religions,[1][2] were the first man and woman. They are central to the belief that humanity is in essence a single family, with everyone descended from a single pair of original ancestors.[3] It also provides the basis for the doctrines of the fall of man and original sin that are important beliefs in Christianity, although not held in Judaism
Judaism
or Islam.[4] In the Book of Genesis
Book of Genesis
of the Hebrew Bible, chapters one through five, there are two creation narratives with two distinct perspectives. In the first, Adam
Adam
and Eve
Eve
are not mentioned (at least not mentioned by name). Instead, God created humankind in God's image and instructed them to multiply and to be stewards over everything else that God had made
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On The Bondage Of The Will
On the Bondage of the Will
On the Bondage of the Will
(Latin: De Servo Arbitrio, literally, "On Un-free Will", or "Concerning Bound Choice"), by Martin Luther, was published in December 1525. It was his reply to Desiderius Erasmus' De libero arbitrio diatribe sive collatio or On Free Will, which had appeared in September 1524 as Erasmus' first public attack on Luther after Erasmus
Erasmus
had been wary about the methods of Luther for many years.[citation needed] At issue was whether human beings, after the Fall of Man, are free to choose good or evil
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Jansenism
Jansenism
Jansenism
was a Catholic
Catholic
theological movement, primarily in France, that emphasized original sin, human depravity, the necessity of divine grace, and predestination. The movement originated from the posthumously published work of the Dutch theologian Cornelius Jansen, who died in 1638. It was first popularized by Jansen's friend Abbot Jean du Vergier de Hauranne, of Saint-Cyran-en-Brenne Abbey, and, after du Vergier's death in 1643, was led by Antoine Arnauld. Through the 17th and into the 18th centuries, Jansenism
Jansenism
was a distinct movement within the Catholic
Catholic
Church
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Predestination
Predestination, in theology, is the doctrine that all events have been willed by God, usually with reference to the eventual fate of the individual soul.[1] Explanations of predestination often seek to address the "paradox of free will", whereby God's omniscience seems incompatible with human free will
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Ajivika
VedantaAdvaita Vishishtadvaita Dvaita
Dvaita
Vedanta Bhedabheda Dvaitadvaita Achintya Bheda Abheda ShuddhadvaitaHeterodoxCharvaka Ājīvika Buddhism JainismOther schoolsVaishnava Smarta Shakta ĪśvaraShaiva: Pratyabhijña Pashupata SiddhantaTantraTeachers (Acharyas)NyayaAkṣapāda Gotama Jayanta Bhatta Raghunatha SiromaniMīmāṃsāJaimini Kumārila Bhaṭṭa PrabhākaraAdvaita VedantaGaudapada Adi Shankara Vācaspati Miśra Vidyaranya Sadananda Madhusūdana Sarasvatī Vijnanabhiksu Ramakrishna Vivekananda Ra
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Theology
Theology
Theology
is the critical study of the nature of the divine
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