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Theodore Of Mopsuestia
Theodore the Interpreter (c. 350 – 428) was bishop of Mopsuestia (as Theodore II) from 392 to 428 AD. He is also known as Theodore of Antioch, from the place of his birth and presbyterate. He is the best known representative of the middle School of Antioch
Antioch
of hermeneutics.Contents1 Life and work 2 Posthumous legacy 3 Literary remains 4 Sources 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksLife and work[edit] Theodore was born at Antioch, where his father held an official position and the family was wealthy (Chrysostom, ad Th. Laps. ii). Theodore's cousin, Paeanius, to whom several of John Chrysostom's letters are addressed, held an important post of civil government; his brother Polychronius became bishop of the metropolitan see of Apamea. Theodore first appears as the early companion and friend of Chrysostom, his fellow-townsman, his equal in rank, and but two or three years his senior in age
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Bible
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Bible
Bible
(from Koine Greek
Koine Greek
τὰ βιβλία, tà biblía, "the books")[1] is a collection of sacred texts or scriptures that Jews
Jews
and Christians consider to be a product of divine inspiration and a record of the relationship between God and humans. Many different authors contributed to the Bible
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History Of Eastern Christianity
Christianity has been, historically a Middle Eastern
Middle Eastern
religion with its origin in Judaism. Eastern Christianity
Eastern Christianity
refers collectively to the Christian traditions and churches which developed in the Middle East, Egypt, Asia Minor, the Far East, Balkans, Eastern Europe, Northeastern Africa and southern India over several centuries of religious antiquity
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Syria
Coordinates: 35°N 38°E / 35°N 38°E / 35; 38Syrian Arab
Arab
Republic الجمهورية العربية السورية (Arabic) al-Jumhūrīyah al-ʻArabīyah as-SūrīyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "حماة الديار" (Arabic) Humat ad-Diyar Guardians of the HomelandCapital and largest city Damascus 33°30′N 36°18′E / 33.500°N 36.300°E / 33.500; 36.300Official languages ArabicEthnic groupsSyrian Arabs Arameans Kurds Turkomans Assyrians Circassians ArmeniansReligion 87%
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Miaphysitism
Miaphysitism
Miaphysitism
is a Christological
Christological
formula holding that in the person of Jesus Christ, divine nature and human nature are united (μία, mia – "one" or "unity") in a compound nature ("physis"), the two being united without separation, without mixture, without confusion and without alteration.[1] Historically, Chalcedonian Christians have considered Miaphysitism
Miaphysitism
in general to be amenable to an orthodox interpretation, in contrast to Monophysitism
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Henotikon
The Henotikon (/həˈnɒtɪkən/ or /həˈnɒtɪˌkɒn/ in English; Greek ἑνωτικόν henōtikón "act of union") was a christological document issued by Byzantine emperor
Byzantine emperor
Zeno in 482, in an unsuccessful attempt to reconcile the differences between the supporters of the Council of Chalcedon
Council of Chalcedon
and the council's opponents. It was followed by the Acacian schism.[1]Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 Bibliography 5 External linksHistory[edit] In 451, the Council of Chalcedon
Council of Chalcedon
settled christological disputes by condemning both Monophysitism, held by Eutyches, and Nestorianism. However, large sections of the Eastern Roman Empire, especially in Egypt, but also in Palestine and Syria, held monophysite (or, more strictly, miaphysite) views
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Monothelitism
Monothelitism
Monothelitism
or monotheletism (from Greek μονοθελητισμός "doctrine of one will") is a particular teaching about how the divine and human relate in the person of Jesus, known as a Christological
Christological
doctrine, that formally emerged in Armenia and Syria
Syria
in 629.[1] Specifically, monothelitism is the view that Jesus Christ has two natures but only one will. This is contrary to the Christology
Christology
that Jesus Christ has two wills (human and divine) corresponding to his two natures (dyothelitism). Monothelitism
Monothelitism
is a development of the Neo-Chalcedonian
Neo-Chalcedonian
position in the Christological debates
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Byzantine Iconoclasm
Byzantine Iconoclasm
Iconoclasm
(Greek: Εἰκονομαχία, Eikonomachía, literally, "image struggle" or "struggle over images") refers to two periods in the history of the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
when the use of religious images or icons was opposed by religious and imperial authorities within the Eastern Church and the temporal imperial hierarchy. The "First Iconoclasm", as it is sometimes called, lasted between about 726 and 787. The "Second Iconoclasm" was between 814 and 842. According to the traditional view, Byzantine Iconoclasm
Iconoclasm
was started by a ban on religious images by Emperor Leo III
Emperor Leo III
and continued under his successors. It was accompanied by widespread destruction of images and persecution of supporters of the veneration of images
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Filioque
Filioque
Filioque
(Ecclesiastical Latin: [filiˈɔkwe]) is a Latin
Latin
term added to the original Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed
Creed
(commonly known as the Nicene Creed), and which has been the subject of great controversy between Eastern and Western Christianity. The Latin
Latin
term Filioque
Filioque
describes the Holy Spirit
Holy Spirit
as proceeding from both the Father and the Son, (and not from the Father only)
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Christian Mysticism
Christian mysticism
Christian mysticism
refers to the development of mystical practices and theory within Christianity. It has often been connected to mystical theology, especially in the Roman Catholic and Orthodox Christianity
Christianity
(both the Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox traditions). The attributes and means by which Christian mysticism
Christian mysticism
is studied and practiced are varied
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Eastern Christian Monasticism
Eastern Christian Monasticism is the life followed by monks and nuns of the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, the Church of the East and Eastern Catholicism. Some authors will use the term "Basilian" to describe Eastern monks; however, this is incorrect, since the Eastern Church does not have religious orders, as in the West, nor does Eastern monasticism have monastic Rules, as in the West.Contents1 History1.1 The Early Church 1.2 The Founders2 Coptic monasticism 3 Syrian monasticism 4 Armenian monasticism 5 Byzantine monasticism5.1 St. Basil the Great 5.2 St
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West Syriac Rite
West Syrian Rite
West Syrian Rite
or West Syriac Rite, also called Syro-Antiochian Rite, is an Eastern Christian
Eastern Christian
liturgical rite that uses West Syriac dialect as liturgical language. It is one of two main liturgical rites of Syriac Christianity.[1] It is chiefly practiced in the Syriac Orthodox Church and churches related to or descended from it. It is part of the liturgical family known as the Antiochian Rite, which originated in the ancient Patriarchate
Patriarchate
of Antioch. It has more anaphoras than any other rite. The rite is practiced in the Syriac Orthodox Church, an Oriental Orthodox body; the Syriac Catholic Church, an Eastern Catholic Church in full communion with the Holy See; and to a great extent in the Maronite Catholic Church, another Eastern Catholic body
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Index Of Eastern Christianity-related Articles
Article
Article
or articles may refer to: Article
Article
(grammar), a grammatical element used to indicate defini
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Hermeneutics
Hermeneutics
Hermeneutics
(/hɜːrməˈnjuːtɪks/)[1] is the theory and methodology of interpretation,[2][3] especially the interpretation of biblical texts, wisdom literature, and philosophical texts.[4][5] Modern hermeneutics includes both verbal and non-verbal communication[6][7] as well as semiotics, presuppositions, and pre-understandings. Hermeneutics
Hermeneutics
has been broadly applied in the humanities, especially in law, history and theology. Hermeneutics
Hermeneutics
was initially applied to the interpretation, or exegesis, of scripture, and has been later broadened to questions of general interpretation.[8] The terms "hermeneutics" and "exegesis" are sometimes used interchangeably
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Paeanius
Paeanius was a late Roman Empire historian, author of a translation into Greek language of the Latin Breviarium historiae Romanae, the historical work of Eutropius. The Breviarium was completed by Eutropius within 369: Paeanius' translation appeared before 380. The Breviarium was a compendium of ancient Roman history, used both as a textbook in schools and as a fast course on Roman history for the higher social classes (it was dedicated to Emperor Valens): Paeanius' translation allowed Greek-speaking people to have a graceful version of this compendium. The translation was first published in print in 1590 by Friedrich Sylburg in his collection of minor Greek writers of Roman history. Later editions of Eutropius often included Paeanius' metaphrasis. The translation was also printed on its own for school use. Bibliography[edit]John J
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John Chrysostom
John Chrysostom
John Chrysostom
(/ˈkrɪsəstəm, krɪˈsɒstəm/; Greek: Ἰωάννης ὁ Χρυσόστομος; c. 349 – 14 September 407),[5] Archbishop
Archbishop
of Constantinople, was an important Early Church Father. He is known for his preaching and public speaking, his denunciation of abuse of authority[6] by both ecclesiastical and political leaders, the Divine Liturgy
Divine Liturgy
of Saint John Chrysostom, and his ascetic sensibilities
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