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Theodore Of Corsica
Theodore I of Corsica (25 August 1694 – 11 December 1756), born Theodor Stephan Freiherr
Freiherr
von Neuhoff,[1] was a German adventurer who was briefly King of Corsica. Theodore is the subject of an opera by G. Paisiello, Il re Teodoro in Venezia (1784, Vienna), and one of the six kings in Venice
Venice
in Voltaire's Candide. Theodor von Neuhoff was born in Cologne
Cologne
as the son of a Westphalian nobleman. Educated at the court of France, he served first in the French army and then in that of Sweden. Baron
Baron
de Goertz, minister to Charles XII, realizing Neuhoff's capacity for intrigue, sent him to England, and to Spain
Spain
to negotiate with Cardinal Alberoni
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Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
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Walter Besant
Sir Walter Besant
Walter Besant
(14 August 1836 – 9 June 1901), was a novelist and historian. William Henry Besant was his brother, and another brother, Frank, was the husband of Annie Besant.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 References3.1 Citations 3.2 Further reading4 External linksBiography[edit] The son of a merchant, he was born at Portsmouth, Hampshire
Hampshire
and attended school at St Paul's, Southsea, Stockwell Grammar, London
London
and King's College London. In 1855, he was admitted as a pensioner to Christ's College, Cambridge, where he graduated in 1859 as 18th wrangler.[1] After a year as Mathematical Master at Rossall School, Fleetwood, Lancashire, and a year at Leamington College, he spent six years as professor of mathematics at the Royal College, Mauritius
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Amsterdam
Amsterdam
Amsterdam
(/ˈæmstərdæm/;[9][10][11] Dutch: [ɑmstərˈdɑm] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous municipality of the Netherlands. Its status as the capital is mandated by the Constitution of the Netherlands,[12] although it is not the seat of the government, which is The Hague.[13] Amsterdam
Amsterdam
has a population of 851,373 within the city proper, 1,351,587 in the urban area,[14] and 2,410,960 in the Amsterdam metropolitan area.[8] The city is located in the province of North Holland in the west of the country but is not its capital, which is Haarlem. The metropolitan area comprises much of the northern part of the Randstad, one of the larger conurbations in Europe, with a population of approximately 7 million.[15] Amsterdam's name derives from Amstelredamme,[16] indicative of the city's origin around a dam in the river Amstel
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Horace Walpole
Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford
Earl of Orford
(24 September 1717 – 2 March 1797), also known as Horace Walpole, was an English art historian, man of letters, antiquarian and Whig politician.[1] He had Strawberry Hill House
Strawberry Hill House
built in Twickenham, south-west London, reviving the Gothic style some decades before his Victorian successors
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Patrick Sarsfield, 1st Earl Of Lucan
Patrick
Patrick
may refer to:Saint PatrickSt
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David Sarsfield
David Sarsfield was an Irish soldier noted for his service in the Jacobite Army during the Williamite War in Ireland. After going into exile as part of the Flight of the Wild Geese, he later served in the Spanish Army. He was killed at the Battle of Villaviciosa in 1710. He was the son of David Sarsfield, 3rd Viscount Sarsfield and the younger brother of Dominick Sarsfield, 4th Viscount Sarsfield, part of a prominent County Limerick family of Old English descent who had remained Roman Catholic. Both he and his elder brother served in the Irish Army of James II between 1689 and 1691. After the Treaty of Limerick ended the war, they went into exile in France. After first living in France, David Sarsfield subsequently went to Spain where he was made Governor of the strategic fortress of Badajoz.[1] His daughter Catalina Sarsfield married a German adventurer Theodore von Neuhoff, who later briefly ruled the Kingdom of Corsica
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County Limerick
County Limerick (Irish: Contae Luimnigh) is a county in Ireland. It is located in the province of Munster, and is also part of the Mid-West Region. It is named after the city of Limerick. Limerick City and County Council is the local council for the county
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Frederick II Of Prussia
Frederick II (German: Friedrich; 24 January 1712 – 17 August 1786) was King of Prussia
King of Prussia
from 1740 until 1786, the longest reign of any Hohenzollern
Hohenzollern
king.[4] His most significant accomplishments during his reign included his military victories, his reorganization of Prussian armies, his patronage of the arts and the Enlightenment in Prussia, and his final success against great odds in the Seven Years' War. Frederick was the last titled King in Prussia
King in Prussia
and declared himself King of Prussia
King of Prussia
after achieving full sovereignty for all historical Prussian lands. Prussia
Prussia
had greatly increased its territories and became a leading military power in Europe under his rule
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Württemberg
Württemberg
Württemberg
is a historical German territory. Together with Baden
Baden
and Hohenzollern, two other historical territories, it now forms the Federal State of Baden-Württemberg
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St Anne's Church, Soho
Saint Anne's Church in the Soho
Soho
section of London
London
was consecrated on 21 March 1686 by Bishop Henry Compton as the parish church of the new civil and ecclesiastical parish of St Anne, created from part of the parish of St Martin in the Fields. The Church of England
Church of England
parish has been the Parish
Parish
of St Anne with St Thomas and St Peter since 1945. The church and parish are part of the Deanery
Deanery
of Westminster (St Margaret) within the Diocese
Diocese
of London
London
in the Church of England
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Geraldine Edith Mitton
Geraldine Edith Mitton (14 October 1868 – 25 March 1955), pen name G. E. Mitton, was an English novelist, biographer, editor, and guide-book writer.[1] She was the third wife of the colonial administrator Sir George Scott, collaborated with him on several novels set in Burma, and wrote his biography. Works[edit]1902 The Opportunist 1902 Chelsea: The Fascination of London[2] 1905 The Scenery of London, illustrated by Herbert M. Marshall 1907 A Bachelor Girl in Burma[3] 1909 The Book of the Railway, illustrated by Allan Stewart 1910 The Thames, illustrated by E. W. Haslehust 1911 Where Great Men Lived in London 1911 The Isle of Wight 1915 Cornwall 1916 " The Lost Cities of Ceylon", published John Murray, London. Reprint 1928. 1936 Scott of the Shan HillsJointly with J. G. Scott:1913 In the Grip of the Wild Wa 1922 The Green Moth 1923 A Frontier Man 1924 Under an Eastern SkyReferences[edit]^ "MITTON, G. E." Who's Who. Vol. 59. 1907
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Knighthood
A knight is a person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a monarch or other political leader for service to the monarch or country, especially in a military capacity. Historically, in Europe, knighthood was conferred upon mounted warriors.[1] During the High Middle Ages, knighthood was considered a class of lower nobility. By the Late Middle Ages, the rank had become associated with the ideals of chivalry, a code of conduct for the perfect courtly Christian warrior. Often, a knight was a vassal who served as a fighter for a lord, with payment in the form of land holdings.[2] The lords trusted the knights, who were skilled in battle on horseback. Knighthood
Knighthood
in the Middle Ages was closely linked with horsemanship (and especially the joust) from its origins in the 12th century until its final flowering as a fashion among the high nobility in the Duchy of Burgundy in the 15th century
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Freiherr
Freiherr
Freiherr
([ˈfʀaɪ̯ˌhɛʁ]; male, abbreviated as Frhr.), Freifrau ([ˈfʀaɪ̯ˌfʀaʊ̯]; his wife, abbreviated as Frfr., literally "free lord" or "free lady")[1] and Freiin ([ˈfʀaɪ̯ɪn]; his unmarried daughters and maiden aunts) are designations used as titles of nobility in the German-speaking areas of the Holy Roman Empire, and in its various successor states, including Austria, Prussia, Bavaria, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, etc. Traditionally it denotes the third-lowest titled rank within the nobility, above Ritter
Ritter
(knight) and Edler
Edler
(nobility without a specific title) and below Graf
Graf
(count, earl) and Herzog
Herzog
(duke). The title superseded the earlier medieval form, Edelherr. It corresponds to baron in rank.[2]Contents1 Freiherr
Freiherr
in the feudal system 2 Freiherr
Freiherr
vs
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Baron
Baron
Baron
is a title of honour, often hereditary. The female equivalent is baroness.Contents1 Etymology 2 Continental Europe2.1 France 2.2 Germany 2.3 Italy 2.4 The Low Countries 2.5 The Nordic Countries 2.6 Russia 2.7 Spain3 The United Kingdom and Ireland3.1 History 3.2 Irish Barons 3.3 Coronet 3.4 Style of address 3.5 Scottish feudal baronies3.5.1 Chapeau and helm 3.5.2 Style of address4 Other 5 See also 6 Sources 7 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The word baron comes from the Old French
Old French
baron, from a Late Latin
Late Latin
baro "man; servant, soldier, mercenary" (so used in Salic Law; Alemannic Law has barus in the same sense)
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