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Theatre (structure)
A theater, theatre or playhouse, is a structure where theatrical works or plays are performed, or other performances such as musical concerts may be produced. While a theater is not required for performance (as in environmental theater or street theater), a theater serves to define the performance and audience spaces. The facility is traditionally organized to provide support areas for performers, the technical crew and the audience members. There are as many types of theaters as there are types of performance. Theaters may be built specifically for a certain types of productions, they may serve for more general performance needs or they may be adapted or converted for use as a theater. They may range from open-air amphitheaters to ornate, cathedral-like structures to simple, undecorated rooms or black box theaters
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Palais Garnier
The Palais Garnier
Palais Garnier
(pronounced [palɛ ɡaʁnje] French   (help·info)) is a 1,979-seat opera house, which was built from 1861 to 1875 for the Paris Opera. It was called the Salle des Capucines, because of its location on the Boulevard des Capucines
Boulevard des Capucines
in the 9th arrondissement of Paris, but soon became known as the Palais Garnier, in recognition of its opulence and its architect, Charles Garnier
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English Renaissance Theatre
English Renaissance
English Renaissance
theatre—also known as early modern English theatre and Elizabethan theatre—refers to the theatre of England between 1562 and 1642. This is the style of the plays of William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson.Contents1 Background 2 Sites of dramatic performance2.1 Grammar schools 2.2 Choir schools 2.3 Universities 2.4 Inns of Court 2.5 Masques3 Establishment of playhouses 4 Playhouse architecture 5 Audiences 6 Performances 7 Costume
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Theatre Of Ancient Greece
The ancient Greek drama was a theatrical culture that flourished in ancient Greece from c. 700 BC. The city-state of Athens, which became a significant cultural, political, and military power during this period, was its center, where it was institutionalised as part of a festival called the Dionysia, which honoured the god Dionysus. Tragedy (late 500 BC), comedy (490 BC), and the satyr play were the three dramatic genres to emerge there. Athens
Athens
exported the festival to its numerous colonies and allies in order to promote a common cultural identity
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Altar
An altar is any structure upon which offerings such as sacrifices are made for religious purposes, and by extension the 'Holy table' of post-reformation Anglican
Anglican
churches. Altars are usually found at shrines, and they can be located in temples, churches and other places of worship. Today they are used particularly in Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Shinto, Taoism. Also seen in Neopaganism
Neopaganism
and Ceremonial Magic. Judaism
Judaism
used such a structure until the destruction of the Second Temple
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Scenery
Theatrical
Theatrical
scenery is that which is used as a setting for a theatrical production. Scenery may be just about anything, from a single chair to an elaborately re-created street, no matter how large or how small, whether the item was custom-made or is the genuine item, appropriated for theatrical use.Contents1 History 2 Contemporary scenery 3 Types of scenery 4 Gallery 5 See alsoHistory[edit] The history of theatrical scenery is as old as the theatre itself, and just as obtuse and tradition bound. What we tend to think of as 'traditional scenery', i.e. two-dimensional canvas-covered 'flats' painted to resemble a three-dimensional surface or vista, is a relatively recent innovation and a significant departure from the more ancient forms of theatrical expression, which tended to rely less on the actual representation of space senerial and more on the conveyance of action and mood
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Orange, France
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Roman Theatre and its surroundings and the Triumphal Arch of Orange UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage SiteIncludes Roman Theatre of Orange
Roman Theatre of Orange
and Triumphal Arch of OrangeCriteria Cultural: iii, viReference 163Inscription 1981 (5th Session)The Triumphal Arch of OrangeMadame Butterfly on 9 July 2007The Roman theatre in OrangeOrange (French pronunciation: ​[ɔʁɑ̃ʒ]; Provençal Occitan: Aurenja in classical norm or Aurenjo in Mistralian norm) is a commune in the Vaucluse
Vaucluse
Department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region in southeastern France, about 21 km (13 mi) north of Avignon
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Roman Theatre (structure)
Roman theatres derive from and are part of the overall evolution of earlier Greek theatres. Indeed, much of the architectural influence on the Romans came from the Greeks, and theatre structural design was no different from other buildings. However, Roman theatres have specific differences, such as generally being built upon their own foundations instead of earthen works or a hillside and being completely enclosed on all sides.Contents1 Buildings 2 List of Roman Theatres 3 See also 4 ReferencesBuildings[edit]Interior view of the Roman theatre of Bosra, Syria: 1) Scaenae frons 2) Porticus post scaenam 3) Pulpitum
Pulpitum
4) Proscaenium 5) Orchestra 6) Cavea
Cavea
7) Aditus maximus 8) Vomitorium.Roman theatres were built in all areas of the empire from Spain to the Middle East
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Ancient Rome
In historiography, ancient Rome
Rome
is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome
Rome
in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and Roman Empire
Roman Empire
until the fall of the western empire.[1] The term is sometimes used to just refer to the kingdom and republic periods, excluding the subsequent empire.[2] The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian peninsula, dating from the 8th century BC, that grew into the city of Rome
Rome
and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed
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Theatre Of Pompey
The Theatre of Pompey
Pompey
(Latin: Theatrum Pompeii, Italian: Teatro di Pompeo) was a structure in Ancient Rome
Ancient Rome
built during the latter part of the Roman Republican era: completed in 55 BC. Enclosed by the large columned porticos was an expansive garden complex of fountains and statues. Along the stretch of the covered arcade were rooms dedicated to the exposition of art and other works collected by Pompey "the Great" (Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus) during his campaigns. On the opposite end of the garden complex was a curia for political meetings. The senate would often use this building along with a number of temples and halls that satisfied the requirements for their formal meetings
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Théâtre Antique D'Orange
The Roman Theatre of Orange
Roman Theatre of Orange
(French: Théâtre antique d'Orange) is a Roman theatre in Orange, Vaucluse, France. It was built early in the 1st century AD. The structure is owned by the municipality of Orange and is the home of the summer opera festival, the Chorégies d'Orange. It is one of the best preserved of all Roman theatres, and served the Roman colony of Arausio (or, more specifically, Colonia Julia Firma Secundanorum Arausio: "the Julian colony of Arausio established by the soldiers of the second legion") which was founded in 40 BC
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The Swan (theatre)
The Swan was a theatre in Southwark, London, England, built in 1595 on top of a previously standing structure,[1] during the first half of William Shakespeare's career.[2] It was the fifth in the series of large public playhouses of London, after James Burbage's The Theatre (1576) and Curtain (1577), the Newington Butts
Newington Butts
Theatre (between 1575 and 1577) and Philip Henslowe's Rose (1587–88). The Swan Theatre was located in the manor of Paris Gardens, on the west end of the Bankside
Bankside
district of Southwark, across the Thames River from the City of London. It was at the northeast corner of the Paris Garden estate nearest to London Bridge that Francis Langley
Francis Langley
had purchased in May 1589, four hundred and twenty-six feet from the river's edge
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Southwark
Southwark
Southwark
(/ˈsʌðərk/ SUDH-ərk)[1] is a district of Central London and part of the London Borough of Southwark. Situated 1 1⁄2 miles (2.4 km) east of Charing Cross, it forms one of the oldest parts of London and fronts the River Thames
River Thames
to the north. It historically formed an ancient borough in the county of Surrey, made up of a number of parishes, which increasingly came under the influence and jurisdiction of the City of London. As an inner district of London, Southwark
Southwark
experienced rapid depopulation during the late 19th and early 20th centuries
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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The Gods (theatrical)
The gods (UK English), or sometimes paradise, is a theatrical term, referring to the highest areas of a theatre such as the upper balconies. These are generally the cheapest seats. One reason for naming the cheapest seats "the gods" is because the theatres have beautifully painted ceilings, often mythological themes, so the cheap seats are up near the gods.[citation needed] Another is that those seated in "the gods" look down upon both the performers and the occupants of more expensive seats, like the Olympian Gods
Olympian Gods
looking down from Mount Olympus
Mount Olympus
upon the lives of mortal people.[citation needed] There are references to the "gods" in many plays and films
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Wattle And Daub
Wattle and daub
Wattle and daub
is a composite building material used for making walls, in which a woven lattice of wooden strips called wattle is daubed with a sticky material usually made of some combination of wet soil, clay, sand, animal dung and straw. Wattle and daub
Wattle and daub
has been used for at least 6,000 years and is still an important construction material in many parts of the world
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