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The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee
The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee
The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee
is a musical comedy with music and lyrics by William Finn, a book by Rachel Sheinkin, conceived by Rebecca Feldman with additional material by Jay Reiss. The show centers on a fictional spelling bee set in a geographically ambiguous Putnam Valley Middle School. Six quirky adolescents compete in the Bee, run by three equally quirky grown-ups. The 2005 Broadway production, directed by James Lapine
James Lapine
and produced by David Stone, James L. Nederlander, Barbara Whitman, Patrick Catullo, Barrington Stage Company and Second Stage Theater, earned good reviews and box-office success and was nominated for six Tony Awards, winning two, including Best Book
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Improvisational Theatre
Improvisational theatre, often called improv or impro, is the form of theatre, often comedy, in which most or all of what is performed is unplanned or unscripted: created spontaneously by the performers. In its purest form, the dialogue, action, story, and characters are created collaboratively by the players as the improvisation unfolds in present time, without use of an already prepared, written script. Improvisational theatre
Improvisational theatre
exists in performance as a range of styles of improvisational comedy as well as some non-comedic theatrical performances. It is sometimes used in film and television, both to develop characters and scripts and occasionally as part of the final product. Improvisational techniques are often used extensively in drama programs to train actors for stage, film, and television and can be an important part of the rehearsal process
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Lucille Lortel Award
The Lucille Lortel
Lucille Lortel
Awards recognize excellence in New York Off-Broadway theatre.[1] The Awards are named for Lucille Lortel, an actress and theater producer, and have been awarded since 1986.[1][2] They are produced by the League of Of
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Wendy Wasserstein
Wendy Wasserstein
Wendy Wasserstein
(October 18, 1950 – January 30, 2006) was an American playwright. She was an Andrew Dickson White Professor-at-Large at Cornell University. She received the Tony Award for Best Play and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama
Pulitzer Prize for Drama
in 1989 for her play The Heidi Chronicles.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early years 1.2 Career 1.3 Personal life2 Bibliography2.1 Plays 2.2 Screenplays 2.3 Books 2.4 Essays 2.5 Papers3 Awards 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Early years[edit] Wasserstein was born in Brooklyn, New York, the daughter of Morris Wasserstein, a wealthy textile executive, and his wife, Lola (née Liska) Schleifer, who moved to the United States from Poland
Poland
when her father was accused of being a spy.[1] Wasserstein "once described her mother as being like 'Auntie Mame'".[2] Lola Wasserstein reportedly inspired some of her daughter's characters
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Grammy Award
"24K Magic"Record of the Year "This Is America"A Grammy Award
Grammy Award
(stylized as GRAMMY, originally called Gramophone Award), or Grammy, is an award presented by The Recording Academy
The Recording Academy
to recognize achievements in the music industry. The annual presentation ceremony features performances by prominent artists, and the presentation of those awards that have a more popular interest
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Euripides
Euripides
Euripides
(/jʊəˈrɪpɪdiːz/ or /jɔːˈrɪpɪdiːz/;[1] Greek: Εὐριπίδης; Ancient Greek: [eu̯.riː.pí.dɛːs]) (c. 480 – c. 406 BC) was a tragedian of classical Athens. Along with Aeschylus
Aeschylus
and Sophocles, he is one of the three ancient Greek tragedians for whom a significant number of plays have survived. Some ancient scholars attributed 95 plays to him but, according to the Suda, it was 92 at most. Of these, 18 or 19 have survived more or less complete (there has been debate about his authorship of Rhesus, largely on stylistic grounds)[2] and there are also fragments, some substantial, of most of the other plays
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Palaestra
The palaestra (/pəˈliːstrə/ or /-ˈlaɪ-/;[1] also (chiefly British) palestra; Greek: παλαίστρα)[2] was the ancient Greek wrestling school. The events that did not require a lot of space, such as boxing and wrestling, were practised there. The palaestra functioned both independently and as a part of public gymnasia; a palaestra could exist without a gymnasium, but no gymnasium could exist without a palaestra.Contents1 Architecture 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksArchitecture[edit] The architecture of the palaestra, although allowing for some variation, followed a distinct, standard plan. The palaestra essentially consisted of a rectangular court surrounded by colonnades with adjoining rooms
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Workshop
Beginning with the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
era, a workshop may be a room, rooms or building which provides both the area and tools (or machinery) that may be required for the manufacture or repair of manufactured goods. Workshops were the only places of production until the advent of industrialization and the development of larger factories. In the 20th and 21st century, many Western homes contain a workshop in the garage, basement, or an external shed. Home workshops typically contain a workbench, hand tools, power tools and other hardware. Along with their practical applications for repair goods or do small manufacturing runs, workshops are used to tinker and make prototypes.[1][2][3] Backshop[edit] Main article: Backshop In some repair industries, such as locomotives and aircraft, the repair operations have specialized workshops called backshops or railway workshops
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Audience
An audience is a group of people who participate in a show or encounter a work of art, literature (in which they are called "readers"), theatre, music (in which they are called "listeners"), video games (in which they are called "players"), or academics in any medium. Audience
Audience
members participate in different ways in different kinds of art; some events invite overt audience participation and others allowing only modest clapping and criticism and reception. Media audience studies have become a recognized part of the curriculum. Audience theory offers scholarly insight into audiences in general. These insights shape our knowledge of just how audiences affect and are affected by different forms of art. The biggest art form is the mass media
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Tony Awards
The Antoinette Perry
Antoinette Perry
Award for Excellence in Broadway Theatre,[1] more commonly known as the Tony Award, recognizes excellence in live Broadway theatre. The awards are presented by the American Theatre Wing and The Broadway League[2] at an annual ceremony in New York City. The awards are given for Broadway productions and performances, and an award is given for regional theatre
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James L. Nederlander
James L. Nederlander (born January 23, 1960) of the Nederlander family of Detroit, Michigan, is also known (somewhat incorrectly) as James Nederlander, Jr., and is a veteran on Broadway as a theatre owner, operator, producer and presenter. He is the president of the Nederlander Organization.Contents1 Biography 2 Personal life 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Nederlander was born to a Jewish family, the son of Barbara Smith and James M
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Lucille Lortel Awards
The Lucille Lortel
Lucille Lortel
Awards recognize excellence in New York Off-Broadway theatre.[1] The Awards are named for Lucille Lortel, an actress and theater producer, and have been awarded since 1986.[1][2] They are produced by the League of Of
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Drama Desk Awards
The Drama Desk Awards are presented annually and were first awarded in 1955 to recognize excellence in New York theatre productions on Broadway, Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway. Broadway productions were excluded until the 1968–69 award season.[1][2] The awards are considered a significant American theatre
American theatre
distinction.[3]Contents1 History 2 Ceremony 3 Award categories 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The Drama Desk organization was formed in 1949 by a group of New York theater critics, editors, reporters and publishers, in order to make the public aware of the vital issues concerning the theatrical industry. They debuted the presentations of the Vernon Rice Awards. The name honors the New York Post
New York Post
critic Vernon Rice, who had pioneered Off-Broadway coverage in the New York press
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Comedy
In a modern sense, comedy (from the Greek: κωμῳδία, kōmōidía) refers to any discourse or work generally intended to be humorous or amusing by inducing laughter, especially in theatre, television, film, stand-up comedy, or any other medium of entertainment. The origins of the term are found in Ancient Greece. In the Athenian democracy, the public opinion of voters was influenced by the political satire performed by the comic poets at the theaters.[1] The theatrical genre of Greek comedy can be described as a dramatic performance which pits two groups or societies against each other in an amusing agon or conflict
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Spelling Bee
A spelling bee is a competition in which contestants are asked to spell a broad selection of words, usually with a varying degree of difficulty. The concept is thought to have originated in the United States,[citation needed] and spelling bee events, along with variants, are now also held in some other countries around the world. The first winner of an official spelling bee was Frank Neuhauser, who won the 1st National Spelling
Spelling
Bee (now known as the Scripps National Spelling Bee) in Washington, D.C
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Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Massachusetts
(/ˌmæsəˈtʃuːsɪts/ ( listen), /-zɪts/), officially known as the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England
New England
region of the northeastern United States. It is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the east, the states of Connecticut
Connecticut
and Rhode Island
Rhode Island
to the south, New Hampshire
New Hampshire
and Vermont
Vermont
to the north, and New York to the west. The state is named after the Massachusett
Massachusett
tribe, which once inhabited the east side of the area. The capital of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
and the most populous city in New England
New England
is Boston
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