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The Wall Street Journal
The Wall Street
Wall Street
Journal is an American business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City. The Journal, along with its Asian and European editions, is published six days a week by Dow Jones & Company, a division of News Corp. The newspaper is published in the broadsheet format and online. The Wall Street
Wall Street
Journal is the largest newspaper in the United States by circulation. According to News Corp, in their June 2017 10-K Filing with the SEC, the Journal had a circulation of about 2.277 million copies (including nearly 1,270,000 digital subscriptions) as of June 2017[update],[2] compared with USA Today's 1.7 million. The newspaper has won 40 Pulitzer Prizes through 2017[3] and derives its name from Wall Street
Wall Street
in the heart of the Financial District of Lower Manhattan
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Headline
The headline is the text indicating the nature of the article below it. The large type front page headline did not come into use until the late 19th century when increased competition between newspapers led to the use of attention-getting headlines. It is sometimes termed a news hed, a deliberate misspelling that dates from production flow during hot type days, to notify the composing room that a written note from an editor concerned a headline and should not be set in type.[1] Headlines in English often use a set of grammatical rules known as headlinese, designed to meet stringent space requirements by, for example, leaving out forms of the verb "to be" and choosing short verbs like "eye" over longer synonyms like "consider".Contents1 Production of headlines 2 Unusual headlines 3 Propaganda 4 See also 5 Further reading 6 References 7 External linksProduction of headlines[edit]
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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Syndicate
A syndicate is a self-organizing group of individuals, companies, corporations or entities formed to transact some specific business, to pursue or promote a shared interest. In most cases formed groups aim to scale up their profits
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Oasys Mobile
Mobile
Mobile
often refers to:A smartphone A tablet computer Mobile
Mobile
phone, a portable device used exclusively for telephony Mobile
Mobile
(sculpture), a hanging artwork or toy Mobile
Mobile
may also refer to:Contents1 Arts and entertainment 2 Places 3 Science3.1 Technology4 See alsoArts and entertainment[edit] Mobile
Mobile
(album), a 1999 album by Brazilian Paulinho Moska The Mobiles, a 1980s British band Mobile
Mobile
(band), a Canadian rock band "Mobile" (song), a 2003 song by Avril Lavigne from Let Go Mobile
Mobile
(TV series), a British ITV drama "Mobile", a short story by J. G. Ballard, later renamed "Venus Smiles" "Mobile", a song by Gentle Giant
Gentle Giant
from the album Free Hand Mobile, a feature of the game GunBoundPlaces[edit]Mobile, Alabama, a U.S
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Audit Bureau Of Circulations (North America)
The Alliance for Audited Media (AAM) is a North American non-profit industry organization founded in 1914 by the Association of National Advertisers to help ensure media transparency and trust among advertisers and media companies. Originally known as the Audit Bureau of Circulations (ABC), today AAM is a source of verified media information and technology platform certifications, providing standards, audit services and data for the advertising and publishing industries. It is one of more than three dozen such organizations operating worldwide, affiliated with the International Federation of Audit Bureaux of Circulations (IFABC). AAM independently verifies print and digital circulation, mobile apps, website analytics, social media, technology platforms and audience information for newspapers, magazines and digital media companies in the U.S. and Canada
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Stock Exchange
A stock exchange or securities exchange is an exchange (or bourse)[note 1] where stock brokers and traders can buy and sell securities, such as shares of stock and bonds and other financial instruments. Stock
Stock
exchanges may also provide facilities for the issue and redemption of such securities and instruments and capital events including the payment of income and dividends.[citation needed] Securities traded on a stock exchange include stock issued by listed companies, unit trusts, derivatives, pooled investment products and bonds. Stock
Stock
exchanges often function as "continuous auction" markets with buyers and sellers consummating transactions at a central location such as the floor of the exchange.[6] To be able to trade a security on a certain stock exchange, the security must be listed there
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Lower Manhattan
Lower Manhattan, also known as Downtown
Downtown
Manhattan, is the southernmost part of Manhattan, the central borough for business, culture, and government in the City of New York, which itself originated at the southern tip of Manhattan
Manhattan
Island in 1624.[1]Contents
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Financial District, Manhattan
Coordinates: 40°42′27″N 74°00′40″W / 40.707499°N 74.011153°W / 40.707499; -74.011153Financial DistrictNeighborhood in ManhattanThe Financial District of Lower Manhattan
Lower Manhattan
viewed from New York Harbor, near the Statue of Liberty, October 2013Country United StatesState New YorkCity New York CityBorough ManhattanPopulation (2010) • Total 60,976The Financial District, also known as FiDi,[1] is a neighborhood located at the southern tip of the borough of Manhattan
Manhattan
in New York City, which comprises the offices and headquarters of many of the city's major financial institutions, including the New York Stock Exchange and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York
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Pulitzer Prize
The Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
/ˈpʊlɪtsər/[1] is an award for achievements in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature, and musical composition in the United States. It was established in 1917 by provisions in the will of American (Hungarian-born) Joseph Pulitzer who had made his fortune as a newspaper publisher, and is administered by Columbia University
Columbia University
in New York City.[2] Prizes are awarded yearly in twenty-one categories. In twenty of the categories, each winner receives a certificate and a U.S
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OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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Edward Jones (statistician)
Edward Davis Jones (7 October 1856 – 16 February 1920)[1] a Welsh descendant, was a U.S. statistician, mostly known for being the "Jones" in the Dow Jones Industrial Average. A graduate of Worcester Academy
Worcester Academy
in Worcester, MA, he co-founded Dow Jones & Company in 1882 along with Charles Dow
Charles Dow
and Charles Bergstresser. He was not associated with Edward Jones Investments, which was founded by an unrelated Edward D. Jones. References[edit]^ Brown Alumni Monthly, Vol. XX, March 1920
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Newspaper Circulation
A newspaper's circulation is the number of copies it distributes on an average day. Circulation is one of the principal factors used to set advertising rates. Circulation is not always the same as copies sold, often called paid circulation, since some newspapers are distributed without cost to the reader. Readership figures are usually higher than circulation figures because of the assumption that a typical copy of the newspaper is read by more than one person. In many countries, circulations are audited by independent bodies such as the Audit
Audit
Bureau of Circulations to assure advertisers that a given newspaper does indeed reach the number of people claimed by the publisher
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Conservatism In The United States
American conservatism is a broad system of political beliefs in the United States
United States
that is characterized by respect for American traditions, Republicanism, support for Judeo-Christian values,[1] moral absolutism,[2] free markets and free trade,[3][4] anti-communism,[4][5] individualism,[4] advocacy of American exceptionalism[6], and a defense of Western culture
Western culture
from the perceived threats posed by socialism, authoritarianism, and moral relativism.[7] Liberty
Liberty
for people who conform to Anglo-American
Anglo-American
values[8], economic freedom, social conservatism, and promotion of Judaeo-Christian[1] ideals are core beliefs, with a particular emphasis on strengthening the free market, limiting the size and scope of government in the economy, and opposition to high taxes and government or labor union encroachment on the entrepreneur
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1947 Pulitzer Prize
The following are the Pulitzer Prizes for 1947.Contents1 Journalism awards 2 Letters, Drama and Music Awards 3 Special
Special
Awards and Citations 4 External linksJournalism awards[edit]Public Service: The Baltimore Sun
The Baltimore Sun
for its series of articles by Howard M
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1211 Avenue Of The Americas
1211 Avenue of the Americas
Avenue of the Americas
(also known as the News Corp. Building) is an International style skyscraper in Upper Manhattan, New York City. Formerly called the Celanese
Celanese
Building, it was completed in 1973 as part of the Rockefeller Center
Rockefeller Center
extension, that started in the late 1950s with the Time-Life Building. The Celanese
Celanese
Corporation would later move to Dallas, Texas. 1211 is owned by an affiliate of Beacon Capital Partners, and leasing is managed by Cushman & Wakefield, Inc., of which the Rockefeller Group was once a major shareholder. The building was part of the later Rockefeller Center
Rockefeller Center
expansion (1960s–1970s) dubbed the "XYZ Buildings"
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