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The Simpsons
08) Ian Maxtone-Graham (2005–2012)Running time 21–24 minutesProduction company(s) Gracie Films
Gracie Films
(1989–present) 20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox

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20th Television
Twentieth Television (or 20TV, stylized as 20th Television) is an American television syndication studio and the syndication arm of 20th Century Fox Television, itself a subsidiary of 21st Century Fox.Contents1 History 2 Notable staff 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] 20th Television
20th Television
was formed in 1989 by Fox, Inc
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Fox Television Animation
Television
Television
(TV) is a telecommunication medium used for transmitting moving images in monochrome (black and white), or in colour, and in two or three dimensions and sound. The term can refer to a television set, a television program ("TV show"), or the medium of television transmission. Television
Television
is a mass medium for advertising, entertainment and news. Television
Television
became available in crude experimental forms in the late 1920s, but it would still be several years before the new technology would be marketed to consumers. After World War II, an improved form of black-and-white TV broadcasting became popular in the United States and Britain, and television sets became commonplace in homes, businesses, and institutions
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Arthur B. Rubinstein
Arthur B. Rubinstein (born March 31, 1938 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American composer. He composed several TV series soundtracks and songs for film scores, including Video Fever and Edge of the World in the 1983 film WarGames. During the making of these soundtracks, he was a member of the band The Beepers. He has frequently been hired by film director John Badham, and the majority of his movie soundtracks are found in Badham's work, including Whose Life Is It Anyway? (1981), Blue Thunder
Blue Thunder
(1983), Stakeout (1987), The Hard Way (1991), Another Stakeout (1993), and Nick of Time (1995). In 1983 Rubinstein created the score to Blue Thunder
Blue Thunder
(which he composed, conducted and produced) using various synthesizers, a popular instrument of the 80's era. In the score Rubinstein used these synthesizers in a symphonic manner by combining them with brass, percussion and string ensembles
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480i
480i
480i
is a shorthand name for the video mode used for standard-definition analog or digital television in Caribbean, Myanmar, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Philippines, Laos, Western Sahara, and most of the Americas
Americas
(with the exception of Argentina, Paraguay
Paraguay
and Uruguay). The 480 identifies a vertical resolution of 480 lines, and the i identifies it as an interlaced resolution. The field rate, which is 60 Hz (or 59.94 Hz when used with NTSC
NTSC
color), is sometimes included when identifying the video mode, i.e. 480i60; another notation, endorsed by both the International Telecommunication Union in BT.601
BT.601
and SMPTE in SMPTE 259M, includes the frame rate, as in 480i/30. The other common standard, used in the other parts of the world, is 576i. In analogue contexts, this resolution is often called "525 lines"
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576i
576i
576i
is a standard-definition video mode originally used for broadcast television in most countries of the world where the utility frequency for electric power distribution is 50 Hz. Because of its close association with the color encoding system, it is often referred to as simply PAL, PAL/ SECAM
SECAM
or SECAM
SECAM
when compared to its 60 Hz (typically, see PAL-M) NTSC-color-encoded counterpart, 480i. In digital applications it is usually referred to as "576i"; in analogue contexts it is often called "625 lines",[1] and the aspect ratio is usually 4:3 in analogue transmission and 16:9 in digital transmission. The 576 identifies a vertical resolution of 576 lines, and the i identifies it as an interlaced resolution
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20th Century Fox Television
Twentieth Century Fox Television (or TCFTV, stylized as 20th Century Fox Television) is the television production division of 20th Century Fox, and a production arm of the Fox Television Group (both are owned by Rupert Murdoch's 21st Century Fox). 20th Television
20th Television
is the syndication and distribution arm of 20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox
Television.[2] On December 14, 2017, The Walt Disney Company
The Walt Disney Company
announced plans to purchase assets of 21st Century Fox, including 20th Century Fox Television, for $52.4 billion.[1] Overview and history[edit] 20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox
Television was formed in 1949 as other studios were branching out into television production as well. At that time, the company was known as TCF Television Productions, Inc
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Danny Elfman
Daniel Robert Elfman (born May 29, 1953) is an American composer, singer, songwriter, and record producer. Elfman first became known for being the lead singer and songwriter for the band Oingo Boingo
Oingo Boingo
from 1974 to 1995 . He is well known for scoring films and television shows, in particular his frequent collaborations with director Tim Burton. In 1976, Elfman entered the film industry as an actor. In 1980, he scored his first film, Forbidden Zone, directed by his older brother Richard Elfman
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Ray Colcord
Ray Colcord III (December 24, 1949 – February 5, 2016) was an American film and television composer,[1][2][3] known for TV series such as 227, The Facts of Life, Silver Spoons, My Two Dads, Dinosaurs, Big Brother, and Boy Meets World. He is a former governor of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, a past President of the Society of Composers & Lyricists, served on the board of directors of the Film Preservation Society and was a member of the National Film Preservation Board
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Bleeding Fingers Music
Bleeding Fingers Music is an American production music company. A joint venture between the Academy Award-winning composer Hans Zimmer, his business partner Steve Kofsky, and Extreme Music, the production arm of Sony/ATV Music Publishing, it is the leading custom scoring company in the film and television industry.[1][2] History[edit] Zimmer began composing music for the Extreme production library in the late '90s, and when Extreme expanded from the UK to the United States in 2001, it set up its offices at Zimmer's Remote Control Productions in Santa Monica, California.[3] In 2012, as Extreme sought to meet increased requests from clients for custom scores for television productions, it partnered with Kofsky and Zimmer to develop what would become Bleeding Fingers Custom Music Shop
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Richard Gibbs
Richard “Ribbs” Gibbs (born in December 5, 1955 in Bay Village, Ohio) is an American film composer and music producer whose credits include the films Dr. Dolittle,[1] Big Momma's House,[2] Queen of the Damned[3] and the television series Battlestar Galactica[4] and The Simpsons (season 1).[5]Contents1 Musical career 2 Personal life 3 Filmography 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksMusical career[edit]This biography of a living person needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. (August 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Gibbs was the keyboard player for the new wave band Oingo Boingo from 1980 to 1984
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Animated Sitcom
An animated sitcom is a subgenre of the sitcom that is animated rather than live action.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Early history 1.2 The Simpsons and expansion of the genre 1.3 21st century2 ReferencesHistory[edit] Early history[edit] The Flintstones, which debuted in 1960, is considered the first example of the animated sitcom genre.[2] The similar cartoon The Jetsons, which took place in the future rather than the past, followed in 1962.[2] Animated sitcoms have been more controversial than traditional cartoons from the onset. The Flintstones
The Flintstones
was originally oriented at parents, as an animated version of The Honeymooners,[3] though it was primarily popular with little boys and girls. In the 1970s, the cartoon Wait Till Your Father Gets Home, often considered an influence on the contemporary Family Guy, debuted and further pushed the envelope
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Tim Long
Tim Long (born June 14, 1969) is a comedy writer born in Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. Tim calls Exeter, Ontario, Canada his home town and has written for The Simpsons, Politically Incorrect, Spy Magazine and the Late Show with David Letterman. Currently credited as a consulting producer on The Simpsons, Long was - until Season 20 - credited as an executive producer. His work has also recently appeared in the New York Times and The New Yorker. He also wrote the episode "Mr Roboto" for YTV's Mr. Young. Long was also a consulting writer on The Simpsons Movie. He attended high school at South Huron District High School in Exeter, Ontario, Canada. His most recent visit to his former high school was November 21, 2007, where he talked to the staff and students about his achievements. Tim graduated from University College at the University of Toronto with a major in English Literature and pursued graduate studies in English at Columbia University. He was an intern at Spy magazine under E
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Ian Maxtone-Graham
Ian Howes Maxtone-Graham (born July 3, 1959) is an American television writer and producer. He has written for Saturday Night Live (1992–1995) and The Simpsons (1995–2015), as well as serving as a co-executive producer and consulting producer for the latter.Contents1 Early years 2 Saturday Night Live 3 The Simpsons3.1 Writing credits4 References 5 External linksEarly years[edit] Maxtone-Graham was born in New York City, the son of maritime historian John Maxtone-Graham. He is the great-nephew of Jan Struther, the writer of Mrs. Miniver. He attended Trinity School and Brown University. An enthusiastic swimmer, his first job after college was as a diver with an underwater research team. After struggling to establish a career in journalism, he penned material for the television show Not Necessarily the News and the magazines National Lampoon and Army Man
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Fox Broadcasting Company
Fox Broadcasting Company[2] (often shortened to Fox and stylized as FOX)[3][4] is an American commercial broadcast television network that is a flagship property of Fox Entertainment Group, a subsidiary of 21st Century Fox. The network is headquartered at the 20th Century Fox studio in Los Angeles, with additional major offices and production facilities at the Fox Television Center also in Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and the Fox Broadcasting Center in New York City. Launched on October 9, 1986, as a competitor to the Big Three television networks (ABC, NBC
NBC
and CBS), Fox went on to become the most successful attempt at a fourth television network
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