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The Secret Sharer
"The Secret Sharer" is a short story[1] by Polish-British author Joseph Conrad, originally written in 1909 and first published in two parts in Harper's Magazine[2] in 1910.[3] It was later included in the short story collection Twixt Land and Sea (1912). The story was adapted for a segment of the 1952 film Face to Face, and also for a one-act play in 1969 by C. R. (Chuck) Wobbe. The play was published in 1969 by the Dramatic Publishing Company. A new film, Secret Sharer, inspired by the story and directed by Peter Fudakowski, was released in the United Kingdom in June 2014.Contents1 Plot summary 2 Analysis 3 References 4 External linksPlot summary[edit] "The Secret Sharer" takes place on a sailing ship in the Gulf of Siam (now the Gulf of Thailand), at the start of a voyage with cargo for Britain. The date is probably in the 1880s, when Conrad was at sea himself. In common with many of Conrad's stories, it is narrated in the first person
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Novella
A novella is a text of written, fictional, narrative prose normally longer than a short story but shorter than a novel, somewhere between 7,500 and 40,000 words. The English word "novella" derives from the Italian novella,[1] derived from nuovo, which means "new"
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Ghost
In folklore, a ghost (sometimes known as an apparition, haunt, phantom, poltergeist, shade, specter or spectre, spirit, spook, and wraith) is the soul or spirit of a dead person or animal that can appear to the living. In ghostlore, descriptions of ghosts vary widely from an invisible presence to translucent or barely visible wispy shapes, to realistic, lifelike visions. The deliberate attempt to contact the spirit of a deceased person is known as necromancy, or in spiritism as a séance. The belief in the existence of an afterlife, as well as manifestations of the spirits of the dead is widespread, dating back to animism or ancestor worship in pre-literate cultures. Certain religious practices—funeral rites, exorcisms, and some practices of spiritualism and ritual magic—are specifically designed to rest the spirits of the dead
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LibriVox
LibriVox
LibriVox
is a group of worldwide volunteers who read and record public domain texts creating free public domain audiobooks for download from their website and other digital library hosting sites on the internet. It was founded in 2005 by Hugh McGuire to provide "Acoustical liberation of books in the public domain"[2] and the LibriVox objective is "To make all books in the public domain available, for free, in audio format on the internet".[3] On 6 August 2016, the project completed project number 10,000.[4][5] and from 2009–2017 was producing about 1,000 items per year.[6] Most releases are in the English language, but many non-English works are also available
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Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
(PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize and archive cultural works, to "encourage the creation and distribution of eBooks".[2] It was founded in 1971 by American writer Michael S. Hart and is the oldest digital library.[3] Most of the items in its collection are the full texts of public domain books. The project tries to make these as free as possible, in long-lasting, open formats that can be used on almost any computer. As of 23 June 2018[update], Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
reached 57,000 items in its collection of free eBooks.[4] The releases are available in plain text but, wherever possible, other formats are included, such as HTML, PDF, EPUB, MOBI, and Plucker. Most releases are in the English language, but many non-English works are also available
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Wikisource
Wikisource
Wikisource
is an online digital library of free content textual sources on a wiki, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation. Wikisource
Wikisource
is the name of the project as a whole and the name for each instance of that project (each instance usually representing a different language); multiple Wikisources make up the overall project of Wikisource. The project's aims are to host all forms of free text, in many languages, and translations. Originally conceived as an archive to store useful or important historical texts (its first text was the Déclaration universelle des Droits de l'Homme), it has expanded to become a general-content library. The project officially began in November 24, 2003 under the name Project Sourceberg, a play on the famous Project Gutenberg
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The Nature Of A Crime
The Nature of a Crime is a collaborative novel written and published in 1909 by authors Joseph Conrad
Joseph Conrad
and Ford Madox Ford. The text did not acquire acclaim until after Conrad's death in 1924, when Ford brought the text to light in his essay "Joseph Conrad: A Personal Remembrance". The Nature of a Crime is the last of three books written by Conrad and Ford.Contents1 Literary and historical context 2 Plot summary 3 Main characters 4 Genre and style 5 Themes 6 Critical reception 7 References 8 External linksLiterary and historical context[edit] The text was written by Ford and Conrad in 1909, eight years after their earliest collaboration. Prior to the creation of this novel, Ford and Conrad shared an extensive working relationship, both as editors and co-authors. The two co-wrote The Inheritors in 1901, followed by Romance in 1903, and finally The Nature of a Crime in 1909
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Cutty Sark
Cutty Sark
Cutty Sark
is a British clipper ship. Built on the River Clyde
River Clyde
in 1869 for the Jock Willis Shipping Line, she was one of the last tea clippers to be built and one of the fastest, coming at the end of a long period of design development, which halted as sailing ships gave way to steam propulsion. The opening of the Suez Canal
Suez Canal
(also in 1869) meant that steamships now enjoyed a much shorter route to China, so Cutty Sark
Cutty Sark
spent only a few years on the tea trade before turning to the trade in wool from Australia, where she held the record time to Britain for ten years.[4] Improvements in steam technology meant that gradually steamships also came to dominate the longer sailing route to Australia, and the ship was sold to the Portuguese company Ferreira and Co. in 1895 and renamed Ferreira
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Clipper Ship
A clipper was a very fast sailing ship of the middle third of the 19th century, generally either a schooner or a brigantine. The original Baltimore clippers were schooners. They had multiple types of sail plans but the most common was three masts and a square rig. They were generally narrow for their length, small by later 19th century standards, could carry limited bulk freight, and had a large total sail area. Clipper
Clipper
ships were mostly constructed in British and American shipyards, though France, Brazil, the Netherlands
Netherlands
and other nations also produced some. Clippers sailed all over the world, primarily on the trade routes between the United Kingdom and its colonies in the east, in trans-Atlantic trade, and on the New York-to-San Francisco route round Cape Horn
Cape Horn
during the California Gold Rush
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Doppelgänger
A doppelgänger (/ˈdɒpəlˌɡɛŋər/ or /-ˌɡæŋər/; German: [ˈdɔpl̩ˌɡɛŋɐ] ( listen), literally "double-goer") is a look-alike or double of a living person, sometimes portrayed as a ghostly or paranormal phenomenon and usually seen as a harbinger of bad luck. Other traditions and stories equate a doppelgänger with an evil twin
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First Mate
A chief mate (C/M) or chief officer, usually also synonymous with the first mate or first officer (except on passenger liners, which often carry both), is a licensed member and head of the deck department of a merchant ship. The chief mate is customarily a watchstander and is in charge of the ship's cargo and deck crew. [1] The actual title used will vary by ship's employment, by type of ship, by nationality, and by trade. Informally, the Chief Mate will often simply be called "The Mate." The term "Chief Mate" is not usually used in the Commonwealth, although Chief Officer and First Mate are. The chief mate is responsible to the Captain for the safety and security of the ship
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Bangkok
Bangkok
Bangkok
(UK: /bæŋˈkɒk/,[6][7] US: /ˈbæŋkɒk/[7][8]) is the capital and most populous city of the Kingdom of Thailand. It is known in Thai as Krung Thep Maha Nakhon (กรุงเทพมหานคร, pronounced [krūŋ tʰêːp mahǎː nákʰɔ̄ːn] ( listen)) or simply Krung Thep ( listen (help·info)). The city occupies 1,568.7 square kilometres (605.7 sq mi) in the Chao Phraya River delta in Central Thailand, and has a population of over 8 million, or 12.6 percent of the country's population
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First-person Narrative
A first-person narrative is a mode of storytelling in which a narrator relays events from their own point of view using the first person i.e. "I" or "we", etc.[1] It may be narrated by a first person protagonist (or other focal character), first person re-teller, first person witness,[2] or first person peripheral (also called a peripheral narrator).[3][4] A classic example of a first person protagonist narrator is Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre
Jane Eyre
(1847),[1] in which the title character is also the narrator telling her own story,[5] "I could not unlove him now, merely because I found that he had ceased to notice me".[6] This device allows the audience to see the narrator's mind's eye view of the fictional universe,[7] but it is limited to the narrator's experiences and awareness of the true state of affairs
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Gulf Of Siam
The Gulf of Thailand, formerly the Gulf of Siam, is a shallow inlet[1][2] in the western part of the South China and Eastern Archipelagic Seas, a marginal body of water in the western Pacific Ocean. The gulf is around 800 km (497 mi) long and up to 560 km (348 mi) wide, has a surface area of 320,000 km2 (123,553 sq mi) and is surrounded on the north, west and southwest by Thailand, on the northeast by Cambodia
Cambodia
and Vietnam
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Peter Fudakowski
Peter Fudakowski is a London-based film producer, writer and director. He studied Economics at Magdalene College, Cambridge, (where he was President of the Cambridge Union Society
Cambridge Union Society
in Michaelmas Term 1976). He graduated with a master's degree and later read for an MBA at the business school INSEAD, France. In 1979 he joined the First National Bank of Chicago, where he worked in the film financing department. In 1982 Peter left to set up his own production company with his wife Henrietta as script editor and head of development. Their company, Premiere Productions Ltd, celebrated its 20th year in the film business with the production of Tsotsi, which won an Oscar for Best Foreign Film in 2006. Since then, Peter and Henrietta have been developing a number of feature film projects, including "Secret Sharer" and "Corams Children"
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Harper's Magazine
Harper's
Harper's
Magazine (also called Harper's) is a monthly magazine of literature, politics, culture, finance, and the arts. Launched in June 1850, it is the second-oldest continuously published monthly magazine in the U.S. ( Scientific American
Scientific American
is the oldest, but did not become monthly until 1921). The current editor is James Marcus, who replaced Christopher Cox in March 2016
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