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The Outsiders (novel)
The Outsiders is a coming-of-age novel by S. E. Hinton, first published in 1967 by Viking Press. Hinton was 15 when she started writing the novel, but did most of the work when she was 16 and a junior in high school.[1] Hinton was 18[2] when the book was published. The book follows two rival groups, the Greasers and the Socs (pronounced by the author as /ˈsoʊʃɪz/, short for Socials), who are divided by their socioeconomic status. The story is told in first-person narrative by protagonist Ponyboy Curtis. The story in the book takes place in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in 1965,[2] but this is never stated in the book. A film adaptation was produced in 1983, and a little-known short-lived television series appeared in 1990, picking up where the movie left off
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Melina Marchetta
Melina Marchetta (born 25 March 1965) is an Australian
Australian
writer and teacher. Marchetta is best known as the author of teen novels, Looking for Alibrandi, Saving Francesca and On the Jellicoe Road. She has twice been awarded the CBCA Children's Book of the Year Award: Older Readers, in 1993 and 2004. For Jellicoe Road she won the 2009 Michael L
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Kleptomaniac
Kleptomania
Kleptomania
or klopemania[1] is the inability to refrain from the urge for stealing items and is usually done for reasons other than personal use or financial gain. First described in 1816, kleptomania is classified in psychiatry as an impulse control disorder.[2] Some of the main characteristics of the disorder suggest that kleptomania could be an obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorder.[3][citation needed] The disorder is frequently under-diagnosed and is regularly associated with other psychiatric disorders, particularly anxiety and eating disorders, and alcohol and substance abuse
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Robert Frost
Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. His work was initially published in England before it was published in America. Known for his realistic depictions of rural life and his command of American colloquial speech,[2] Frost frequently wrote about settings from rural life in New England
New England
in the early twentieth century, using them to examine complex social and philosophical themes. Frost was honored frequently during his lifetime, receiving four Pulitzer Prizes
Pulitzer Prizes
for Poetry. He became one of America's rare "public literary figures, almost an artistic institution."[3] He was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal
Congressional Gold Medal
in 1960 for his poetic works
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Concussion
Concussion, also known as mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is typically defined as a head injury with a temporary loss of brain function.[8] Symptoms may include headache, trouble with thinking, memory or concentration, nausea, blurry vision, sleep disturbances, or mood changes.[1] Some symptoms may begin immediately, while others may appear days after the injury.[1] Fewer than 10% of sports-related concussions among children are associated with loss of consciousness.[9] It is not unusual for symptoms to last up to four weeks.[2] Common causes include motor vehicle collisions, falls, sports injuries, and bicycle accidents.[3][4] Risk factors include drinking alcohol.[5] The mechanism may involve either a direct blow to the head or forces elsewhere on the body that are transmitted to the head.[2] This is believed to result in neuron dysfunction as there is increased glucose requirements but insufficient blood supply.[2] Diagnosis requires less than 30 minutes of loss of consciousness,
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Robert Hunt (illustrator)
Robert Hunt (born 1952) is an American illustrator and painter. Over the course of his illustration career, Hunt has created works for a wide variety of clients, including Bank of America, CBS Records, Criterion Collection, Dreamworks, Disney, Federal Express, MGM, The New Republic, Paramount, Random House, Rolling Stone, Universal Studios, The Wall Street Journal, Williams Sonoma, and many more.[1]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Illustration career2.1 Getting started3 Notable works3.1 DreamWorks logo 3.2 New Republic covers 3.3 Motion graphics 3.4 Book cover illustrations4 Teaching 5 Honors and awards 6 Personal life 7 References 8 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Robert Hunt was born in 1952 in Berkeley, California and attended High School at San Rafael High School in San Rafael, California. [2] Hunt's grandparents lived a few miles from his family home and he would frequently visit his Grandfather who had suffered a stroke
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Alcoholic
Alcoholism, also known as alcohol use disorder (AUD), is a broad term for any drinking of alcohol that results in mental or physical health problems.[12] The disorder was previously divided into two types: alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence.[1][13] In a medical context, alcoholism is said to exist when two or more of the following conditions is present: a person drinks large amounts over a long time period, has difficulty cutting down, acquiring and drinking alcohol takes up a great deal of time, alcohol is strongly desired, usage results in not fulfilling responsibilities, usage results in social problems, usage results in health problems, usage results in risky situations, withdrawal occurs when stopping, and alcohol tolerance has occurred with use.[1] Risky situations include drinking and driving or having unsafe sex, among other things.[1] Alcohol use can affect all parts of the body, but it particularly affects the brain, heart, liver, pancreas, and immune system.[3][4] This can
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Child Abuse
Child abuse
Child abuse
or child maltreatment is physical, sexual, or psychological maltreatment or neglect of a child or children, especially by a parent or other caregiver
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Gang Violence
A gang is a group of friends or members of a family with a defined leadership and internal organization that identifies with or claims control over territory in a community and engages, either individually or collectively, in illegal, and possibly violent, behavior. Some criminal gang members are "jumped in" (by going through a process of initiation), or they have to prove their loyalty and right to belong by committing certain acts, usually theft or violence
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Capital Punishment
Capital punishment, also known as the death penalty, is a government-sanctioned practice whereby a person is put to death by the state as a punishment for a crime. The sentence that someone be punished in such a manner is referred to as a death sentence, whereas the act of carrying out the sentence is known as an execution. Crimes that are punishable by death are known as capital crimes or capital offences, and they commonly include offences such as murder, treason, espionage, war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide. Etymologically, the term capital (lit
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Slang
Slang refers to words, phrases and uses that are regarded as very informal and often restricted to special context or peculiar to a specified profession class and the like. Slang words are used in specific social groups, like teenagers, which they use oftentimes in their conversations.Contents1 Etymology of the word slang 2 Defining slang2.1 Examples of slang (cross-linguistic)3 Formation of slang 4 Social implications4.1 Indexicality4.1.1 First and second order indexicality 4.1.2 Higher-order indexicality4.2 Subculture associations 4.3 Social media and Internet slang 4.4 Debates about slang5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEtymology of the word slang[edit] In its earliest attested use (1756), the word slang referred to the vocabulary of "low or disreputable" people, commonly phrased as the use of shortened language
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Family Dysfunction
A dysfunctional family is a family in which conflict, misbehavior, and often child neglect or abuse on the part of individual parents occur continuously and regularly, leading other members to accommodate such actions. Children sometimes grow up in such families with the understanding that such an arrangement is normal. Dysfunctional families are primarily a result of two adults, one typically overtly abusive and the other codependent, and may also be affected by addictions, such as substance abuse (e.g., alcohol or drugs), or sometimes an untreated mental illness. Dysfunctional parents may emulate or over-correct from their own dysfunctional parents
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Sue Townsend
Susan Lillian "Sue" Townsend, FRSL (2 April 1946 – 10 April 2014) was an English writer and humorist whose work encompasses novels, plays and works of journalism. She was best known for creating the character Adrian Mole. After writing in secret from the age of 14, Townsend first became known for her plays, her signature character first appearing in a radio drama, but her work soon expanded into other forms. She enjoyed great success in the 1980s, with her Adrian Mole books selling more copies than any other work of fiction in Britain during the decade. This series, which eventually encompassed nine books, takes the form of the character's diaries. The earliest books recount the life of a teenage boy during the Thatcher years, but the sequence eventually depicts Adrian Mole in middle age
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Martin Handford
Martin Handford (born 27 September 1956)[1][2] is an English children's author and illustrator who gained worldwide fame in the mid-1980s with his Where's Wally? creation (known as Where's Waldo? in North America).Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Born in Hampstead, London, Handford was a solitary child, born to divorced parents. He began drawing crowds when he was 4 or 5 years old, and later as a child, making stick figures on paper.[3] After school, when most other children he knew would go out and play games, he would draw pictures instead.[3] His inspiration to draw such figures came from classic films and the toy soldiers he played with during that era. As an adult, Handford worked for three years in an insurance office (Crusader Insurance Company) to pay for his degree at art college. He studied art at UCA (University for the Creative Arts) formerly KIAD (Kent Institute of Art and Design) in Maidstone, Kent
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