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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as the NYT and NYTimes) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[5][6][7] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 127 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[8][9] The Times
The Times
is ranked 18th in the world by circulation and 3rd in the U.S.[10] The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded and is controlled by the Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[11] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Austria-Hungary
Coordinates: 48°12′N 16°21′E / 48.200°N 16.350°E / 48.200; 16.350Austro-Hungarian Empire.mw-parser-output .nobold font-weight:normal ↓Österreichisch-Ungarische Monarchie  (German)Osztrák-Magyar Monarchia  (Hungarian)1867-1918 Civil ensign[a] Coat of arms Motto: Indivisibiliter ac inseparabiliter‘Indivisibly and inseparably’Anthem: Gott erhalte, Gott beschütze’God shall save, God shall protect‘Austria- Hungary
Hungary
on the eve of World War IAustro-Hungarian
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication, such as a magazine.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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List Of Pulitzer Prizes Awarded To The New York Times
Pulitzer
Pulitzer
may refer to: Pulitzer
Pulitzer
Prize, an annual U.S. journalism, literary, and music award Pulitzer
Pulitzer
(surname) Pulitzer, Inc., a U.S
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Page Layout
Page layout
Page layout
is the part of graphic design that deals in the arrangement of visual elements on a page. It generally involves organizational principles of composition to achieve specific communication objectives.[1] The high-level page layout involves deciding on the overall arrangement of text and images, and possibly on the size or shape of the medium. It requires intelligence, sentience, and creativity, and is informed by culture, psychology, and what the document authors and editors wish to communicate and emphasize. Low-level pagination and typesetting are more mechanical processes. Given certain parameters - boundaries of text areas, the typeface, font size, and justification preference can be done in a straightforward way. Until desktop publishing became dominant, these processes were still done by people, but in modern publishing they are almost always automated
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Gatling Gun
The Gatling gun
Gatling gun
is one of the best-known early rapid-fire spring loaded, hand cranked weapons and a forerunner of the modern machine gun. Invented by Richard Gatling, it is known for its use by the Union forces during the American Civil War
American Civil War
in the 1860s, which was the first time it was employed in combat. Later, it was used again in numerous military conflicts, such as the Boshin War, the Anglo-Zulu War, and the assault on San Juan Hill during the Spanish–American War.[4] It was also used by the Pennsylvania militia in episodes of the Great Railroad Strike of 1877, specifically in Pittsburgh. The Gatling gun's operation centered on a cyclic multi-barrel design which facilitated cooling and synchronized the firing-reloading sequence
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Union Army
American Indian Wars American Civil WarFort Sumter First Bull Run Wilson's Creek Forts Henry and Donelson Shenandoah South Mills Richmond Harpers Ferry Munfordville Shepherdstown Chambersburg Raid Mississippi River Peninsula Shiloh Jackson's Valley Campaign Second Bull Run South Mountain Antietam Hartsville Fredericksburg Stones River Chancellorsville Gettysburg Champion Hill Vicksburg siege Corydon Chickamauga Chattanooga Wilderness Atlanta Spotsylvania Sabine Pass New Hope Church Pickett's Mill Cold Harbor Plymouth Fort Pillow Petersburg siege Kennesaw Mountain Jonesborough Franklin Nashville Appomattox Court HouseCommandersCommander-in-Chief 16th President of the United States
United States
- Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
(1861-1865) 17th President Andrew Johnson
Andrew Johnson
(1865)General-in-Chief 1st: Winfield Scott 2nd: George B. McClellan 3rd: Henry W. Halleck Final: Ulysses S
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Sunday Review
Sunday
Sunday
is the day of the week after Saturday
Saturday
but before Monday. Sunday is a day of rest in most Western countries, as a part of the weekend. For most observant Christians, Sunday
Sunday
is observed as a day of worship and rest, holding it as the Lord's Day
Lord's Day
and the day of Christ's resurrection. In some Muslim countries
Muslim countries
and Israel,[citation needed] Sunday
Sunday
is the first work day of the week
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Christopher Morgan (politician)
Christopher Morgan (June 4, 1808 – April 3, 1877) was a U.S. Representative from New York. Born in Aurora, New York, Morgan pursued classical studies and was graduated from Yale College
Yale College
in 1830. He began to study law with an attorney in Aurora, and completed his studies with Elijah Miller and William H. Seward
William H. Seward
in Auburn. Morgan was then admitted to the bar, and commenced practice in Aurora. Morgan was elected as a Whig to the Twenty-sixth and Twenty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1839 – March 3, 1843). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1842 to the Twenty-eighth Congress. He moved to Auburn in 1843 and practiced law with Seward and Samuel Blatchford as Morgan, Blatchford & Seward from 1844-1847
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OCLC
OCLC, Inc., d/b/a OCLC[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio
Ohio
College Library Center, then became the Online Computer Library Center as it expanded. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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Public Company
A public company, publicly traded company, publicly held company, publicly listed company, or public limited company is a corporation whose ownership is dispersed among the general public in many shares of stock which are freely traded on a stock exchange or in over-the-counter markets. In some jurisdictions, public companies over a certain size must be listed on an exchange. A public company can be listed (listed company) or unlisted (unlisted public company). Public companies are formed within the legal systems of particular states, and therefore have associations and formal designations which are distinct and separate in the polity in which they reside. For example one of the main public company forms in the United States
United States
is called a limited liability company (or LLC), in France is called a "society of limited responsibility" (SARL), in Britain a public limited company (plc), and in Germany a company with limited liability (GmbH)
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Tabloid (newspaper Format)
A tabloid is a newspaper with a compact page size smaller than broadsheet. A tabloid is defined as "roughly 17 by 11 inches (432 by 279 mm)" and commonly "half the size of a broadsheet", although there is no standard size for this newspaper format. The term tabloid journalism refers to an emphasis on such topics as sensational crime stories, astrology, celebrity gossip and television, and is not a reference to newspapers printed in this format. Some small-format papers with a high standard of journalism refer to themselves as compact newspapers. Larger newspapers, traditionally associated with higher-quality journalism, are called broadsheets, even if the newspaper is now printed on smaller pages
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Edwin B. Morgan
Edwin Barber Morgan (May 2, 1806 – October 13, 1881) was an entrepreneur and politician from the Finger Lakes
Finger Lakes
region of western New York. He was the first president of Wells Fargo & Company, founder of the United States Express Company, and director of American Express Company. He was elected to the United States House of Representatives from New York and served for three terms
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Color Photography
Color
Color
(or colour) photography is photography that uses media capable of reproducing colors. By contrast, black-and-white (monochrome) photography records only a single channel of luminance (brightness) and uses media capable only of showing shades of gray. In color photography, electronic sensors or light-sensitive chemicals record color information at the time of exposure. This is usually done by analyzing the spectrum of colors into three channels of information, one dominated by red, another by green and the third by blue, in imitation of the way the normal human eye senses color
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List Of Newspapers In The World By Circulation
This is a list of paid daily newspapers in the world by average circulation. Worldwide newspaper circulation figures are compiled by the International Federation of Audit Bureaux of Circulations and World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers
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