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The Magazine Of Fantasy
A magazine is a publication, usually a periodical publication, which is printed or electronically published (sometimes referred to as an online magazine). Magazines are generally published on a regular schedule and contain a variety of content. They are generally financed by advertising, by a purchase price, by prepaid subscriptions, or a combination of the three. At its root, the word "magazine" refers to a collection or storage location. In the case of written publication, it is a collection of written articles
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Magazine (other)
A magazine is a kind of periodical publication. Magazine
Magazine
may also refer to:Contents1 Storage 2 Entertainment2.1 Music 2.2 Other uses3 Places 4 Other uses 5 See alsoStorage[edit] Magazine
Magazine
(artillery), a place to stor
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Journal Des Sçavans
The Journal des sçavans
Journal des sçavans
(later renamed Journal des savants), established by Denis de Sallo, was the earliest academic journal published in Europe. Its content included obituaries of famous men, church history, and legal reports.[1] The first issue appeared as a twelve-page quarto pamphlet[2] on Monday, 5 January 1665.[3] This was shortly before the first appearance of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, on 6 March 1665.[4] The 18th-century French physician and encyclopédiste Louis-Anne La Virotte (1725–1759) was introduced to the journal through the protection of chancellor Henri François d'Aguesseau. The journal ceased publication in 1792, during the French Revolution, and, although it very briefly reappeared in 1797 under the updated title Journal des savants, it did not re-commence regular publication until 1816
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Erbauliche Monaths Unterredungen
Erbauliche Monaths Unterredungen ("Edifying Monthly Discussions") was a German philosophy periodical issued from 1663 to 1668.[1] Though the publication's scope tended to be narrow (the majority of its content was singly authored by Johann Rist, a theologian and poet from Hamburg), it inspired the creation of other similar magazines and led to an enthusiasm for education among its primarily intellectual audience. The 'Erbauliche Monaths Unterredungen' is considered to be one of the earliest publications to resemble a modern magazine.[2] References[edit]^ "magazine (publishing)". Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. Retrieved 25 January 2014.  ^ "magazine (publishing)". Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc
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The Gentleman's Magazine
The Gentleman's Magazine
Magazine
was founded in London, England, by Edward Cave in January 1731.[1] It ran uninterrupted for almost 200 years, until 1922. It was the first to use the term magazine (from the French magazine, meaning "storehouse") for a periodical.[2] Samuel Johnson's first regular employment as a writer was with The Gentleman's Magazine.Contents1 History 2 Series 3 Indexes 4 See also4.1 Authors of works appearing in The Gentleman's Magazine5 Artists, painters, topographers associated with The Gentleman's Magazine 6 References 7 Further reading 8 See also 9 External linksHistory[edit] The original complete title was The Gentleman's Magazine: or, Trader's monthly intelligencer. Cave's innovation was to create a monthly digest of news and commentary on any topic the educated public might be interested in, from commodity prices to Latin poetry
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Edward Cave
Edward Cave
Edward Cave
(27 February 1691 – 10 January 1754) was an English printer, editor and publisher. He coined the term "magazine" for a periodical, founding The Gentleman's Magazine
The Gentleman's Magazine
in 1731, and was the first publisher to successfully fashion a wide-ranging publication.[1] The son of a cobbler, Cave was born in Newton near Rugby, Warwickshire and attended Rugby School, but was expelled after being accused of stealing from the headmaster Henry Holyoake. He worked at a variety of jobs, including timber merchant, reporter and printer. He conceived the idea of a periodical that would cover every topic the educated public was interested in, from commerce to poetry, and tried to convince several London printers and booksellers to take up the idea. When no one showed any interest, Cave took on the task by himself
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Herbert Ingram
Herbert Ingram
Herbert Ingram
(27 May 1811 – 8 September 1860) was a British journalist and politician. He is considered the father of pictorial journalism through his founding of The Illustrated London News, the first illustrated magazine.[1] He was a Liberal politician who favoured social reform and represented Boston for four years until his early death in a shipping accident.Contents1 Early life 2 The Illustrated London News 3 MP for Boston 4 Death and legacy 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Ingram was born at Paddock Grove, Boston, Lincolnshire, the son of a butcher.[2] After being educated at Laughton's Charity School and the free school in Wormgate (a street in Boston), he was apprenticed as a fourteen-year-old to town printer Joseph Clarke
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Illustrated
An illustration is a decoration, interpretation or visual explanation of a text, concept or process,[1] designed for integration in published media, such as posters, flyers, magazines, books, teaching materials, animations, video games and films. The origin of the word “illustration” is late Middle English (in the sense ‘illumination; spiritual or intellectual enlightenment’): via Old French from Latin illustratio(n- ), from the verb illustrate.[2]Contents1 Contemporary illustration 2 Technical and scientific illustration 3 Illustration
Illustration
as fine art 4 History4.1 Early history 4.2 19th Century 4.3 The “Golden Age”5 See also 6 R
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The Scots Magazine
The Scots Magazine is a magazine containing articles on subjects of Scottish interest. It is the oldest magazine in the world still in publication[1] although there have been several gaps in its publication history. It has reported on events from the defeat of the Jacobites through the Napoleonic wars
Napoleonic wars
to the Second World War and on to the creation of the new Scottish Parliament. It was originally published in January 1739[2] its first edition being dated Monday 9 February 1739 and publication continued until 1826; at which point sales had declined to such a point that it was withdrawn. However, in December 1887 publication resumed as a partial successor to The Scottish Church under a new owner (S. Cowan, Perth) and continued until 1893 when once again it was withdrawn. It was published between 1922 and 1924 as The Scottish Church
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Lloyd's List
Lloyd's List is one of the world's oldest continuously running journals, having provided weekly shipping news in London as early as 1734. It was published daily until 2013 (when issue 60,850 was published), and in constantly updated digital format only since then. Known simply as The List, it was begun by the proprietor of Lloyd's Coffee House in the City of London, England as a reliable and concise source of information for the merchants' agents and insurance underwriters who met regularly in his establishment in Lombard Street to negotiate insurance coverage for trading vessels.[1] The digital version, updated hour-to-hour,[2] and used internationally, continues to fulfil a similar purpose
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History Of French Journalism
Newspapers have played a major role in French politics, economy and society since the 17th century.Contents1 Origins1.1 Magazines2 1789-1815: Revolutionary era2.1 1815-18713 Modern France: 1871-19183.1 Corruption 3.2 Stagnation after 19144 Radio 5 Since 1940 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading8.1 Before 1945 8.2 Recent historyOrigins[edit] The first French newspaper, Gazette (afterwards called the Gazette de France), started in 1615 under the patronage and with the active co-operation of Cardinal Richelieu. The first editor and printer was Théophraste Renaudot. The first weekly edition appeared in May 1631.[1] Each edition of the paper, which cost six centimes, consisted of a single sheet (folded into eight pages), and was divided into two parts. The first page was entitled Gazette, the second Nouvelles ordinaires de divers endroits. It commonly began with foreign and with national news
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History Of Journalism
The history of journalism, or the development of the gathering and transmitting of news spans the growth of technology and trade, marked by the advent of specialized techniques for gathering and disseminating information on a regular basis that has caused, as one history of journalism surmises, the steady increase of "the scope of news available to us and the speed with which it is transmitted. Before the printing press was invented, word of mouth was the primary source of news. Returning merchants, sailors and travelers brought news back to the mainland, and this was then picked up by pedlars and travelling players and spread from town to town. Ancient scribes often wrote this information down
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Mercure De France
The Mercure de France
France
was originally a French gazette and literary magazine first published in the 17th century, but after several incarnations has evolved as a publisher, and is now part of the Éditions Gallimard
Éditions Gallimard
publishing group. The gazette was published from 1672 to 1724 (with an interruption in 1674–77) under the title Mercure galant (sometimes spelled Mercure gallant) (1672–74) and Nouveau Mercure galant (1677–1724). The title was changed to Mercure de France
France
in 1724. The gazette was briefly suppressed (under Napoleon) from 1811 to 1815 and ceased publication in 1825. The name was revived in 1890 for both a literary review and (in 1894) a publishing house initially linked with the symbolist movement
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La Gazette (France)
La Gazette (French pronunciation: ​[la ɡazɛt]), originally Gazette de France, was the first weekly magazine published in France. It was founded by Théophraste Renaudot and published its first edition on 30 May 1631. It progressively became the mouthpiece of one royalist faction, the Legitimists.[1] With the rise of modern news media and specialized and localized newspapers throughout the country in the early 20th century, La Gazette was finally discontinued in 1915.Contents1 During the Ancien Régime 2 During the Revolution 3 See also 4 References 5 External links 6 BibliographyDuring the Ancien Régime[edit] Before the advent of the printed Gazette, reports on current events usually circulated as hand-written papers (nouvelles à la main)
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VideoAge International
VideoAge International is a TV trade magazine based in New York City, with offices in Los Angeles, California and Milan, Italy. Known simply as VideoAge, it is published by TV Trade Media, Inc. Its subtitle is "The Business Journal of Film, Broadcasting, Broadband, Production, Distribution," which was modified in 2000 from its 1981 version, "The Business Journal of Television." It comes out seven times per year. It also publishes dailies during major international TV trade shows. It is now considered the only TV trade publication 100% devoted to the business of buying and selling content.Contents1 History 2 Current 3 Format 4 Online services 5 Sources 6 External linksHistory[edit] VideoAge was launched in 1981 by Dom (Domenico) Serafini, when the international television industry was still in its infancy. The magazine made its first appearance at VIDCOM, a television trade market in Cannes that was a precursor of MIPCOM
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Jean Loret
Jean Loret
Jean Loret
(ca 1600-1665) was a French writer and poet known for publishing the weekly news of Parisian society (including, initially, its pinnacle, the court of Louis XIV
Louis XIV
itself) from 1650 until 1665 in verse in what he called a gazette burlesque.[1] He is sometimes referred
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