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The London Gazette
The London Gazette
The London Gazette
is one of the official journals of record of the British government, and the most important among such official journals in the United Kingdom, in which certain statutory notices are required to be published. The London Gazette
The London Gazette
claims to be the oldest surviving English newspaper and the oldest continuously published newspaper in the UK, having been first published on 7 November 1665 as The Oxford
Oxford
Gazette.[note 1][2] This claim is also made by the Stamford Mercury (1712) and Berrow's Worcester Journal (1690), because The Gazette is not a conventional newspaper offering general news coverage
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Piano
The piano is an acoustic, stringed musical instrument invented in Italy
Italy
by Bartolomeo Cristofori
Bartolomeo Cristofori
around the year 1700 (the exact year is uncertain), in which the strings are struck by hammers. It is played using a keyboard,[1] which is a row of keys (small levers) that the performer presses down or strikes with the fingers and thumbs of both hands to cause the hammers to strike the strings. The word piano is a shortened form of pianoforte, the Italian term for the early 1700s versions of the instrument, which in turn derives from gravicembalo col piano e forte[2] and fortepiano
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Lease
A lease is a contractual arrangement calling for the lessee (user) to pay the lessor (owner) for use of an asset.[1] Property, buildings and vehicles are common assets that are leased. Industrial or business equipment is also leased. Broadly put, a lease agreement is a contract between two parties, the lessor and the lessee. The lessor is the legal owner of the asset; the lessee obtains the right to use the asset in return for regular rental payments.[2] The lessee also agrees to abide by various conditions regarding their use of the property or equipment. For example, a person leasing a car may agree that the car will only be used for personal use. The narrower term rental agreement can be used to describe a lease in which the asset is tangible property.[3] Language used is that the user rents the land or goods let out or rented out by the owner
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Deed Of Change Of Name
A deed of change of name is a legal document—used in the United Kingdom, Ireland and some other countries with legal systems based on English common law—for an official name change by a person or family. It is one use of a deed poll. Some organisations, such as government departments issuing passports and driving licences, may not recognise a name change without documentation, such as a deed or statutory declaration. However, an official document is not a legal requirement for a valid name change[1] according to common law.[2]Contents1 Legal procedure1.1 United Kingdom 1.2 Republic of Ireland2 History 3 References 4 External linksLegal procedure[edit] United Kingdom[edit] In England and Wales, such a deed may be registered in the Central Office of the High Court. Deeds so registered are advertised in the London Gazette
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Heraldry
Heraldry
Heraldry
(/ˈhɛrəldri/) is a broad term, encompassing the design, display, and study of armorial bearings (known as armory), as well as related disciplines, such as vexillology, together with the study of ceremony, rank, and pedigree.[1][2][3] Armory is the most familiar branch of heraldry, concerning the design and transmission of the heraldic achievement, more commonly known as the coat of arms
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Royal Proclamation
A proclamation (Lat. proclamare, to make public by announcement) is an official declaration issued by a person of authority to make certain announcements known. Proclamations are currently used within the governing framework of some nations and are usually issued in the name of the head of state.Contents1 United Kingdom 2 United States 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksUnited Kingdom[edit] In English law, a proclamation is a formal announcement ("royal proclamation"), made under the great seal, of some matter which the King in Council or Queen in Council desires to make known to his or her subjects: e.g., the declaration of war, or state of emergency, the statement of neutrality, the summoning or dissolution of Parliament, or the bringing into operation of the provisions of some statute the enforcement of which the legislature has left to the discretion of the king in the announcement
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Machine-readable Data
Machine-readable data is data (or metadata) in a format that can be easily processed by a computer. There are two types: human-readable data that is marked up so that it can also be read by machines (e.g. microformats, RDFa, HTML) or data file formats intended principally for processing by machines (RDF, XML, JSON). However, Extensible Markup Language (XML) is designed to be both human- and machine-readable, and Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) is used to improve presentation of the data for human readability. For example, XSLT
XSLT
can be used to automatically render XML
XML
in PDF. Machine-readable data can be automatically transformed for human-readability but, generally speaking, the reverse is not true. Machine readable is not synonymous with digitally accessible
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XML
In computing, Extensible Markup Language
Language
(XML) is a markup language that defines a set of rules for encoding documents in a format that is both human-readable and machine-readable. The W3C's XML
XML
1.0 Specification[2] and several other related specifications[3]—all of them free open standards—define XML.[4] The design goals of XML
XML
emphasize simplicity, generality, and usability across the Internet.[5] It is a textual data format with strong support via Unicode
Unicode
for different human languages
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FTP
The File
File
Transfer Protocol (FTP) is a standard network protocol used for the transfer of computer files between a client and server on a computer network. FTP is built on a client-server model architecture and uses separate control and data connections between the client and the server.[1] FTP users may authenticate themselves with a clear-text sign-in protocol, normally in the form of a username and password, but can connect anonymously if the server is configured to allow it. For secure transmission that protects the username and password, and encrypts the content, FTP is often secured with SSL/TLS (FTPS)
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RDFa
RDFa
RDFa
(or Resource Description Framework
Resource Description Framework
in Attributes[1]) is a W3C Recommendation that adds a set of attribute-level extensions to HTML, X HTML
HTML
and various XML-based document types for embedding rich metadata within Web documents. The RDF data-model mapping enables its use for embedding RDF subject-predicate-object expressions within XHTML documents
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Atom Feed
The name Atom applies to a pair of related Web standards. The Atom Syndication Format is an XML
XML
language used for web feeds, while the Atom Publishing Protocol ( AtomPub
AtomPub
or APP) is a simple HTTP-based protocol for creating and updating web resources.[1] Web feeds allow software programs to check for updates published on a website. To provide a web feed, the site owner may use specialized software (such as a content management system) that publishes a list (or "feed") of recent articles or content in a standardized, machine-readable format
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Gibraltar
Gibraltar
Gibraltar
(/dʒɪˈbrɔːltə/, /dʒɪˈbrɒltə/ or other permutations; Spanish pronunciation: [xiβɾalˈtaɾ]) is a British Overseas Territory
British Overseas Territory
located at the southern tip of the Iberian Peninsula.[8][9] It has an area of 6.7 km2 (2.6 sq mi) and is bordered to the north by Spain. The landscape is dominated by the Rock of Gibraltar
Rock of Gibraltar
at the foot of which is a densely populated city area, home to over 30,000 people, primarily Gibraltarians.[10] In 1704, Anglo-Dutch forces captured Gibraltar
Gibraltar
from Spain
Spain
during the War of the Spanish Succession
War of the Spanish Succession
on behalf of the Habsburg
Habsburg
claim to the Spanish throne
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Insolvency
Insolvency is the state of being unable to pay the money owed, by a person or company, on time; those in a state of insolvency are said to be insolvent. There are two forms: cash-flow insolvency and balance-sheet insolvency. Cash-flow insolvency is when a person or company has enough assets to pay what is owed, but does not have the appropriate form of payment. For example, a person may own a large house and a valuable car, but not have enough liquid assets to pay a debt when it falls due. Cash-flow insolvency can usually be resolved by negotiation. For example, the bill collector may wait until the car is sold and the debtor agrees to pay a penalty. Balance-sheet insolvency is when a person or company does not have enough assets to pay all of their debts. The person or company might enter bankruptcy, but not necessarily
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Battle Of Cabrita Point
The Battle of Cabrita Point, sometimes referred to as the Battle of Marbella, was a naval battle that took place while a combined Spanish-French force besieged Gibraltar
Gibraltar
on 10 March 1705 (21 March 1705 in the New Calendar) during the War of Spanish Succession. The battle was an allied victory (English, Portuguese and Dutch) which effectively ended the Franco-Spanish siege of Gibraltar.Contents1 Prelude 2 The battle 3 Aftermath 4 ReferencesPrelude[edit] The allies had conquered Gibraltar
Gibraltar
on behalf of the Archduke Charles of Habsburg on 1 August 1704. The Spanish besieged the city by land, and in that year, the French had made a first failed attempt to attack from the sea in the Battle of Vélez-Málaga. In January 1705 Philip V of Spain
Spain
was determined to reconquer the city and had Villadarias replaced by Marshal de Tessé
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Charles II Of England
Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685)[c] was king of England, Scotland and Ireland. He was king of Scotland from 1649 until his deposition in 1651, and king of England, Scotland and Ireland from the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 until his death. Charles II's father, Charles I, was executed at Whitehall on 30 January 1649, at the climax of the English Civil War. Although the Parliament of Scotland
Parliament of Scotland
proclaimed Charles II king on 5 February 1649, England entered the period known as the English Interregnum or the English Commonwealth, and the country was a de facto republic, led by Oliver Cromwell. Cromwell defeated Charles II at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651, and Charles fled to mainland Europe. Cromwell became virtual dictator of England, Scotland and Ireland, and Charles spent the next nine years in exile in France, the Dutch Republic and the Spanish Netherlands
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Oxford
Oxford
Oxford
(/ˈɒksfərd/)[3][4] is a city in the South East region of England
England
and the county town of Oxfordshire. With an estimated 2016 population of 170,350, it is the 52nd largest city in the United Kingdom,[5][6] and one of the fastest growing and most ethnically diverse.[7][8] The city is situated 57 miles (92 km) from London, 69 miles (111 km) from Bristol, 65 miles (105 km) from both Southampton
Southampton
and Birmingham
Birmingham
and 25 miles (40 km) from Reading. The city is known worldwide as the home of the University of Oxford, the oldest university in the English-speaking world.[9] Buildings in Oxford
Oxford
demonstrate notable examples of every English architectural period since the late Saxon period. Oxford
Oxford
is known as the "city of dreaming spires", a term coined by poet Matthew Arnold
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