HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

The Life Of Emile Zola
The Life of Emile Zola
The Life of Emile Zola
is a 1937 American biographical film about French author Émile Zola, played by Paul Muni
Paul Muni
and directed by William Dieterle. It has the distinction of being the second biographical film to win the Oscar for Best Picture. It premiered at the Los Angeles Carthay Circle Theatre
Carthay Circle Theatre
to great success both critically and financially. Contemporary reviews cited it the best biographical film made up to that time
[...More...]

"The Life Of Emile Zola" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

French Guyana
French Guiana
French Guiana
(pronounced /ɡiːˈɑːnə/ or /ɡiːˈænə/, French: Guyane française; French pronunciation: ​[ɡɥijan fʁɑ̃sɛz]), officially called Guiana (French: Guyane), is an overseas department and region of France, on the north Atlantic coast of South America
South America
in the Guyanas. It borders Brazil
Brazil
to the east and south and Suriname
Suriname
to the west. Its 83,534 km2 (32,253 sq mi) area has a very low population density of only 3.4 inhabitants per square kilometre (8.8/sq mi), with half of its 281,612 inhabitants in 2018 living in the metropolitan area of Cayenne, its capital
[...More...]

"French Guyana" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Biographical Film
A biographical film, or biopic (/ˈbaɪoʊpɪk/;[1] abbreviation for biographical motion picture), is a film that dramatizes the life of a non-fictional or historically-based person or people
[...More...]

"Biographical Film" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Paul Cézanne
Paul Cézanne
Paul Cézanne
(US: /seɪˈzæn/ or UK: /sɪˈzæn/; French: [pɔl sezan]; 19 January 1839 – 22 October 1906) was a French artist and Post-Impressionist
Post-Impressionist
painter whose work laid the foundations of the transition from the 19th-century conception of artistic endeavor to a new and radically different world of art in the 20th century. Cézanne's often repetitive, exploratory brushstrokes are highly characteristic and clearly recognizable. He used planes of colour and small brushstrokes that build up to form complex fields. The paintings convey Cézanne's intense study of his subjects. Cézanne is said to have formed the bridge between late 19th-century Impressionism
Impressionism
and the early 20th century's new line of artistic enquiry, Cubism
[...More...]

"Paul Cézanne" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Post-Impressionism
Post- Impressionism
Impressionism
(also spelled Postimpressionism) is a predominantly French art movement that developed roughly between 1886 and 1905, from the last Impressionist
Impressionist
exhibition to the birth of Fauvism. Post- Impressionism
Impressionism
emerged as a reaction against Impressionists' concern for the naturalistic depiction of light and colour. Due to its broad emphasis on abstract qualities or symbolic content, Post- Impressionism
Impressionism
encompasses Neo-Impressionism, Symbolism, Cloisonnism, Pont-Aven School, and Synthetism, along with some later Impressionists' work
[...More...]

"Post-Impressionism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Library Of Congress
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
(LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States
United States
Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States. The Library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.; it also maintains the Packard Campus in Culpeper, Virginia, which houses the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center.[3] The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
claims to be the largest library in the world.[4][5] Its "collections are universal, not limited by subject, format, or national boundary, and include research materials from all parts of the world and in more than 450 languages
[...More...]

"Library Of Congress" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Agent Provocateur
An agent provocateur (French for "inciting agent") is a person who commits, or who acts to entice another person to commit an illegal or rash act or falsely implicate them in partaking in an illegal act
[...More...]

"Agent Provocateur" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Libel
Defamation, calumny, vilification, or traducement is the communication of a false statement that harms the reputation of an individual person, business, product, group, government, religion, or nation.[1] Under common law, to constitute defamation, a claim must generally be false and must have been made to someone other than the person defamed.[2] Some common law jurisdictions also distinguish between spoken defamation, called slander, and defamation in other media such as printed words or images, called libel.[3] False light laws protect against statements which are not technically false, but which are misleading.[4] In some civil law jurisdictions, defamation is treated as a crime rather than a civil wrong.[5] The
[...More...]

"Libel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Los Angeles
Los AngelesCSA Los Angeles-Long BeachMSA Los Angeles-Long Beach-AnaheimPueblo September 4, 1781[3]City status May 23, 1835[4]Incorporated April 4, 1850[5]Named for Our Lady, Queen of the AngelsGovernment • Type Mayor-Council-Commission[6] • Body Los Angeles
Los Angeles
City Council • Mayor Eric Garcetti[7] • City Attorney Mike Feuer[7] • City Controller Ron Galperin[7]Area[8] • City in California 502.76 sq m
[...More...]

"Los Angeles" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Premiere
A premiere or première is the debut (first public presentation) of a play, film, dance, or musical composition.[1] A work will often have many premières: a world première (the first time it is shown anywhere in the world) and its first presentation in each country. When a work originates in a country that speaks a different language from that in which it is receiving its national or international première, it is possible to have two premières for the same work in the same country—for example, the play The Maids by the French dramatist Jean Genet
Jean Genet
received its British première (which also happened to be its world première) in 1952, in a production given in the French language. Four years later, it was staged again, this time in English, which was its English-language première in Britain.Contents1 Etymology 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksEtymology[edit] Raymond F
[...More...]

"Premiere" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Henry O'Neill
Sept titles: Ó Néill Mór O'Neill of Tyrone O'Neill of Clandeboye O'Neill of the FewsInternational titles:Dux Hibernicorum Prince of Ulster Prince of Tyrone Prince of Clanaboy Prince of the Fews Earl of Tyrone Count of Tyrone Marquis del Norte[1] Viscount O'Neill Viscount of Santa Mónica Marquis de la Granja Baron Dungannon Baron O'Neill of Shane's Castle Baron Rathcavan Baroness O'Neill of Bengarve Baron O'Neill of Clackmannan Baron O'Neill of Gatley O'Neill baronetsThe O'Neill dynasty
O'Neill dynasty
(Irish: Ó Néill) is a group of families, ultimately all of Irish Gaelic origin, that have held prominent positions and titles in Ireland
Ireland
and elsewhere. As Chiefs of Cenél nEógain, they are historically the most prominent family of the Northern Uí Néill, along with the O'Donnell, O'Doherty and the O'Donnelly clans (the Chief of the Donnellys being the hereditary Marshal of the O'Neill forces)
[...More...]

"Henry O'Neill" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Carbon monoxide
Carbon monoxide
poisoning typically occurs from breathing in too much carbon monoxide (CO).[3] Symptoms are often described as "flu-like" and commonly include headache, dizziness, weakness, vomiting, chest pain, and confusion.[1] Large exposures can result in loss of consciousness, arrhythmias, seizures, or death.[1][2] The classically described "cherry red skin" rarely occurs.[2] Long term complications may include feeling tired, trouble with memory, and movement problems.[5] In those exposed to smoke, cyanide toxicity should also be considered.[2]
[...More...]

"Carbon Monoxide Poisoning" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ferdinand Walsin Esterhazy
French Foreign Legion 74th Line Infantry RegimentBattles/wars Franco-Prussian WarCharles Marie Ferdinand Walsin Esterhazy
Ferdinand Walsin Esterhazy
(16 December 1847 – 21 May 1923) was an officer in the French Army
French Army
from 1870 to 1898. He gained notoriety as a spy for the German Empire
German Empire
and the actual perpetrator of the act of treason of which Captain Alfred Dreyfus
Alfred Dreyfus
was wrongfully accused and convicted in 1894[1] (see Dreyfus affair). After evidence against Esterhazy was discovered and made public, he was eventually subjected to a closed military trial in 1898, only to be officially found not guilty. A revisionist theory raises the possibility that Esterhazy may have been a double agent working for the French counter-espionage service and that this could help to explain the degree of protection he received (see section below)
[...More...]

"Ferdinand Walsin Esterhazy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

J'accuse (letter)
"J'accuse...!" (French pronunciation: ​[ʒaˈkyz], "I accuse...!") was an open letter published on 13 January 1898 in the newspaper L'Aurore
L'Aurore
by the influential writer Émile Zola. In the letter, Zola addressed President of France
President of France
Félix Faure
Félix Faure
and accused the government of anti-Semitism and the unlawful jailing of Alfred Dreyfus, a French Army
French Army
General Staff
General Staff
officer who was sentenced to lifelong penal servitude for espionage. Zola pointed out judicial errors and lack of serious evidence. The letter was printed on the front page of the newspaper and caused a stir in France and abroad. Zola was prosecuted for libel and found guilty on 23 February 1898
[...More...]

"J'accuse (letter)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alfred Dreyfus
World War IBattle of Verdun Second Battle of the AisneAwards Chevalier de la Légion d'honneur
Légion d'honneur
(1906) Officier de la Légion d'honneur
Légion d'honneur
(1918)Relations Raphael Dreyfus (father) Jeannette Libmann (mother) Lucie Eugénie Hadamard (wife) Pierre Dreyfus (son) Jeanne Dreyfus (daughter)Signature Alfred Dreyfus
Alfred Dreyfus
(French: [al.fʁɛd dʁɛ.fys]; 9 October 1859 – 12 July 1935) was a French Jewish artillery officer whose trial and conviction in 1894 on charges of treason became one of the most tense political dramas in modern French history
French history
with a wide echo in all Europe
[...More...]

"Alfred Dreyfus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nana (novel)
Nana is a novel by the French naturalist author Émile Zola. Completed in 1880, Nana is the ninth installment in the 20-volume Les Rougon-Macquart series.Contents1 Origins 2 Plot summary 3 Reception 4 Later references4.1 Adaptations5 References 6 External linksOrigins[edit] A year before he started to write Nana, Zola knew nothing about the Théâtre des Variétés. Ludovic Halévy
Ludovic Halévy
invited him to attend an operetta with him there on February 15, 1878, and took him backstage. Halévy told him innumerable stories about the amorous life of the star, Anna Judic, whose ménage à trois served as the model for the relationships of Rose Mignon, her husband, and Steiner in Zola's novel
[...More...]

"Nana (novel)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.