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The Jack Benny Program
The Jack Benny
Jack Benny
Program, starring Jack Benny, is a radio-TV comedy series that ran for more than three decades and is generally regarded as a high-water mark in 20th-century American comedy.[1]Contents1 Cast 2 Radio 3 Television 4 End 5 Syndication and DVDs 6 Episodes 7 Format 8 Racial attitudes 9 References 10 External links10.1 AudioCast[edit]This section may contain an excessive amount of intricate detail that may only interest a specific audience. Please help by spinning off or relocating any relevant information, and removing excessive detail that may be against's inclusion policy. (July 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Group photograph of Eddie Anderson, Dennis Day, Phil Harris, Mary Livingstone, Jack Benny, Don Wilson, and Mel Blanc Jack Benny
Jack Benny
- played himself
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Hooray For Hollywood (song)
"Hooray for Hollywood" is a song first featured in the 1937 movie Hollywood Hotel, and which has since become (together with "That's Entertainment" and "Another Op'nin', Another Show") the staple soundtrack element of any Academy Awards
Academy Awards
ceremony. It is even frequently played during non-American movie ceremonies, e.g. the French César Awards. The popularity of the song is notably due to the lyrics by Johnny Mercer, which reference the American movie industry and satirize the illusory desire of many people to become famous as actors.Contents1 Composition 2 Usage 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksComposition[edit] The music was composed by Richard A. Whiting. In the original movie it was sung by Johnnie Davis
Johnnie Davis
and Frances Langford, accompanied by Benny Goodman and his orchestra. Lyrics can be difficult to fully understand today, as they refer to people (e.g. Aimee Semple) or cultural elements (e.g
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Fred Allen
John Florence Sullivan (May 31, 1894 – March 17, 1956), known professionally as Fred Allen, was an American comedian whose absurdist, topically pointed radio program The Fred Allen
Fred Allen
Show (1932–1949) made him one of the most popular and forward-looking humorists in the Golden Age of American radio.[1][2] His best-remembered gag was his long-running mock feud with friend and fellow comedian Jack Benny, but it was only part of his appeal; radio historian John Dunning (in On the Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio) wrote that Allen was radio's most admired comedian and most frequently censored. A master ad libber, Allen often tangled with his network's executives (and often barbed them on the air over the battles) while developing routines whose style and substance influenced fellow comic talents, including Groucho Marx, Stan Freberg, Henry Morgan and Johnny Carson; his avowed fans also included President Franklin D
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The Yankee Doodle Boy
"The Yankee Doodle Boy", also well known as "(I'm a) Yankee Doodle Dandy" is a patriotic song from the Broadway musical Little Johnny Jones written by George M. Cohan. The play opened at the Liberty Theater on November 7, 1904. The play concerns the trials and tribulations of a fictional American jockey, Johnny Jones (based on the real life jockey Tod Sloan), who rides a horse named Yankee Doodle in the English Derby. Cohan incorporates snippets of several popular traditional American songs into his lyrics of this song, as he often did with his songs. The song was performed by James Cagney in the 1942 film Yankee Doodle Dandy, in which he played Cohan.[1]Contents1 Modern performances and covers 2 Lyrics 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksModern performances and covers[edit] In 2004, the American Film Institute placed the song at No. 71 on its AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs
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Love In Bloom (song)
"Love in Bloom" is a popular song with music by Ralph Rainger and lyrics by Leo Robin, published in 1934. It was introduced in the film She Loves Me Not by Bing Crosby
Bing Crosby
and Kitty Carlisle.[1] The song was first recorded by Bing Crosby
Bing Crosby
on July 5, 1934 with Irving Aaronson and his Commanders for Brunswick Records.[2] The same year, it was one of the nominees for the inaugural "Best Song" Academy Award when it lost out to "The Continental".[3] Crosby re-recorded the song for his 1954 album Bing: A Musical Autobiography. Other popular versions of the song in 1934 were by Paul Whiteman (vocal by Jack Fulton), Guy Lombardo
Guy Lombardo
and by Hal Kemp (vocal by Skinnay Ennis).[4] Most famously, "Love in Bloom" became the theme song of Jack Benny
Jack Benny
who was known for playing it off-key on his violin
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Alice Faye
Alice Jeane Faye (née Leppert; May 5, 1915 – May 9, 1998)[1] was an American actress and singer, described by The New York Times
The New York Times
as "one of the few movie stars to walk away from stardom at the peak of her career".[2] She was the second wife of actor and comedian Phil Harris. She is often associated with the Academy Award–winning standard "You'll Never Know", which she introduced in the 1943 musical film Hello, Frisco, Hello.Contents1 Early life 2 Film
Film
career 3 End of motion picture career 4 Marriage and radio career 5 Later life and death 6 Popularity and legacy 7 Film
Film
appearances 8 Radio appearances 9 References 10 External linksEarly life[edit] Alice Faye
Alice Faye
was born Alice Jeane Leppert on May 5, 1915 in New York City, New York, the daughter of Charles and Alice Leppert
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Maxwell Automobile
The Maxwell was a brand of automobiles manufactured in the United States of America from about 1904 to 1925. The present-day successor to the Maxwell company is Fiat Chrysler
Chrysler
Automobiles.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Maxwell-Briscoe Company 1.2 Maxwell Motor Company, Inc. 1.3 Takeover by Walter Chrysler 1.4 Phase out2 Marketing to women 3 In media 4 See also 5 Notes 6 Sources 7 External linksHistory[edit] Maxwell-Briscoe Company[edit] Maxwell automobile
Maxwell automobile
production began under the Maxwell-Briscoe Company of Tarrytown, New York
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John Tackaberry
John Tackaberry (9 October 1912 – 24 June 1969) was a radio writer for The Jack Benny Show.Contents1 Early years 2 Writing career 3 Personal life 4 References 5 External linksEarly years[edit] He was born in Adelaide, Australia and grew up in Oodnadatta, a small railroad stop in the Simpson Desert in the Australian State of South Australia. His father, Arthur Lee Tackaberry, a graduate of Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, Louisiana, was, by birth, an East Texan and his mother, Myrtle Amelia Tackaberry (née Stace) was born and raised in Palmerston North, New Zealand. His father was the doctor for the Ghan Railroad which, at the time, ran from Adelaide to Alice Springs, Australia. In 1920 he moved with his parents and sister to Houston, Texas USA, his father's birth state. He grew to manhood in Houston and was briefly a student at the University of Texas School of Law
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Rabbit Maranville
As playerBoston Braves (1912–1920) Pittsburgh Pirates
Pittsburgh Pirates
(1921–1924) Chicago Cubs
Chicago Cubs
(1925) Brooklyn Robins
Brooklyn Robins
(1926) St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
(1927–1928) Boston Braves (1929–1933, 1935)As manager Chicago Cubs
Chicago Cubs
(1925)Career highlights and awards World Series
World Series
champion (1914)Member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame
Baseball Hall of Fame
Induction 1954Vote 82.94% (14th ballot)Walter James Vincent "Rabbit" Maranville (November 11, 1891 – January 6, 1954) was an American professional baseball shortstop, second baseman and manager. He played in Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
(MLB) for the Boston Braves, Pittsburgh Pirates, Chicago Cubs, Brooklyn Robins, and St
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William Morrow (screenwriter)
William S. Morrow (August 16, 1907 – February 5, 1971) – usually known as Bill – was a comedic screenwriter and producer who wrote scripts for radio, films and television. He launched his writing career with Jack Benny
Jack Benny
in 1938 and for 25 years was Bing Crosby's top writer.[1] He arrived in Los Angeles with Eddie Beloin from Chicago to work on Jack Benny's writing staff, and he remained with the comedian until entering the Armed Forces in 1942. During his time with Jack Benny, he wrote for two of Benny’s films, Love Thy Neighbor (1940) and Buck Benny Rides Again (1940), as well as for the star vehicle Tales of Manhattan (1942).[2] Released from the Armed Forces in 1945, he joined Bing Crosby
Bing Crosby
and not only worked on his radio shows but on his films and television shows as well
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Al Boasberg
Al Boasberg (December 5, 1891[1] – June 18, 1937) was an American comedy writer in vaudeville, radio, and film, as well as being a film director.Contents1 Biography 2 Selected filmography 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Boasberg was born in Buffalo, New York
Buffalo, New York
in a Jewish
Jewish
family. He is credited with helping to create American stand-up comedy when he teamed with then-youthful vaudeville performer Jack Benny, helping develop Benny's familiar, reactive skinflint and thus helping make Benny a major star when he transitioned to radio in 1932. In fact, on the last day before his death, Boasberg wrote the lines that introduced the enduring Rochester character on Benny's radio show. Similarly, Boasberg defined the enduring personalities of Bob Hope, Burns and Allen, Wheeler and Woolsey
Wheeler and Woolsey
and Leon Errol
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Tout
In British English, a tout is any person who solicits business or employment in a persistent and annoying manner (generally equivalent to a solicitor or barker in American English, or a spruiker in Australian English)
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Unseen Character
An unseen character or (in radio) silent character is a fictional character referred to but not directly observed by the audience, but who advances the action of the plot in a significant way, and whose absence enhances their effect on the plot.[1]Contents1 History 2 Purpose and characteristics 3 Examples3.1 Theatre 3.2 UK television and radio 3.3 US television4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Unseen characters have been used since the beginning of theatre with the ancient Greek tragedians, such as Laius in Sophocles' Oedipus Rex and Jason's bride in Euripides' Medea, and continued into Elizabethan theatre with examples such as Rosaline
Rosaline
in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet.[2] However, it was the early twentieth-century European playwrights Strindberg, Ibsen, and Chekhov who fully developed the dramatic potential of the unseen character
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Catchphrase
A catchphrase (alternatively spelled catch phrase) is a phrase or expression recognized by its repeated utterance. Such phrases often originate in popular culture and in the arts, and typically spread through word of mouth and a variety of mass media (such as films, internet, literature and publishing, television and radio). Some become the de facto or literal "trademark" or "signature" of the person or character with whom they originated, and can be instrumental in the typecasting (beneficially or otherwise) of a particular actor.Contents1 Culture 2 See also2.1 Lists 2.2 Related topics3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksCulture[edit] According to Richard Harris, a psychology professor at Kansas State University who studied why people like to cite films in social situations, using film quotes in everyday conversation is similar to telling a joke and a way to form solidarity with others
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American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
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American Revolutionary War
Allied victory:Peace of Paris British recognition of American independence End of the First British Empire British retention of Canada
Canada
and GibraltarTerritorial changesGreat Britain cedes to the United States
United States
the area east of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
and south of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and St
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