HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

The Independent
The Independent
The Independent
is a British online newspaper.[2] Established in 1986 as an independent national morning newspaper published in London, it was controlled by Tony O'Reilly's Independent News & Media from 1997 until it was sold to Russian oligarch
[...More...]

"The Independent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Parody
A parody (/ˈpærədi/; also called a spoof, send-up, take-off, lampoon, play on something, caricature, or joke) is a work created to imitate, make fun of, or comment on an original work—its subject, author, style, or some other target—by means of satiric or ironic imitation
[...More...]

"Parody" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Media Of The United Kingdom
There are several different types of media in the United Kingdom: television, radio, newspapers, magazines and websites. The country also has a strong music industry. The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
has a diverse range of providers, the most prominent being the publicly-owned public service broadcaster, the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The BBC's largest competitors are ITV plc, which operates 13 of the 15 regional television broadcasters that make up the ITV Network, and 21st Century Fox, which holds a large stake in the satellite broadcaster Sky plc. Regional media is covered by local radio, television and print newspapers
[...More...]

"Media Of The United Kingdom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

PRISA
Promotora de Informaciones, S.A (PRISA) is a Spanish media conglomerate.Contents1 History and profile 2 Holdings2.1 Newspapers 2.2 Magazines 2.3 Music and radio 2.4 Television3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory and profile[edit] The PRISA
PRISA
group was founded in 1972[3][4] by Jesús de Polanco who was the major shareholder and the president of the company until his death on 21 July 2007.[5] The other founder was José Ortega Spotorno, a son of the philos
[...More...]

"PRISA" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Michael Berry, Baron Hartwell
William Michael Berry, Baron Hartwell MBE (18 May 1911 – 3 April 2001), was a British newspaper proprietor and journalist.Contents1 Life and career 2 Marriage and family 3 References 4 External linksLife and career[edit] Berry was the second son of Mary Agnes (Corns) and William Berry, 1st Viscount
Viscount
Camrose, and was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford. Berry followed his brother Seymour Berry, 2nd Viscount Camrose as Chairman and Editor-in-Chief of the Daily and Sunday Telegraph newspapers. He remained in this role until the takeover by Conrad Black in 1986. He was also the backer behind the arts review, X magazine.[1] Berry was awarded a life peerage as Baron Hartwell, of Peterborough Court in the City of London
London
in 1968
[...More...]

"Michael Berry, Baron Hartwell" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

El País
El País
El País
( listen (help·info); literally The Country) is the second most read newspaper in Spanish online and the second most circulated daily newspaper in Spain, (only after sports newspaper Marca)[7] and one of three Madrid
Madrid
dailies considered to be national newspapers of record for Spain
Spain
(along with El Mundo and ABC)[citation needed]. El País, based in Madrid, is owned by the Spanish media conglomerate PRISA. Its headquarters and central editorial staff are located in Madrid, although there are regional offices in the principal Spanish cities (Barcelona, Seville, Valencia, Bilbao, Santiago de Compostela) where regional editions are produced
[...More...]

"El País" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sunday Correspondent
A correspondent or on-the-scene reporter is usually a journalist or commentator for magazines, or more speaking, an agent who contributes reports to a newspaper, or radio or television news, or another type of company, from a remote, often distant, location. A foreign correspondent is stationed in a foreign country. The term correspondent refers to the original practice of filing news reports via postal letter. The largest networks of correspondents belong to ARD (Germany) and BBC
BBC
(UK).Contents1 Vs. reporter 2 Common types2.1 Capitol correspondent 2.2 Legal/justice correspondent 2.3 Red carpet
Red carpet
correspondent 2.4 Foreign correspondent2.4.1 War correspondent 2.4.2 Foreign bureau3 On-the-scene TV news 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksVs. reporter[edit] In Britain, the term 'correspondent' usually refers to someone with a specific specialist area, such as health correspondent
[...More...]

"Sunday Correspondent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Advertising Campaign
An advertising campaign An advertising campaign is a series of advertisement messages that share a single idea and theme which make up an integrated marketing communication (IMC). An IMC is a platform in which a group of people can group their ideas, beliefs, and concepts into one large media base (Edit made here with additive substance). Advertising
Advertising
campaigns utilize diverse media channels over a particular time frame and target identified audiences. The campaign theme is the central message that will be received in the promotional activities and is the prime focus of advertising campaign as it sets the motif for the series of. individual advertisements and other marketing communications that will be used. The campaign themes are usually produced with the objective of being used for a significant period but many of them are temporal due to factors like being not effective or market conditions,competition and marketing mix
[...More...]

"Advertising Campaign" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Masthead (publishing)
In American usage, a publication's masthead is a printed list, published in a fixed position in each edition, of its owners, departments, officers and address details,[1][2] which in British English usage is known as imprint.[3] In the UK and many other Commonwealth nations, "the masthead" is a publication's designed title as it appears on the front page;[3] what in American English is known as the nameplate. References[edit]^ Funk & Wagnall's Standard Dictionary, New York 1960 ^ E.g., masthead of The New York Times ^ a b The Guardian: "Newspaper terminology" Archived 2013-08-30 at WebCite Linked 2013-06-16This publishing-related article is a stub
[...More...]

"Masthead (publishing)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Russian Oligarch
The Russian oligarchs (see the related term "New Russians") are business oligarchs of the former Soviet republics who rapidly accumulated wealth during the era of Russian privatization
Russian privatization
in the aftermath of the dissolution of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
in the 1990s. The failing Soviet state left the ownership of state assets contested, which allowed for informal deals with former USSR
USSR
officials (mostly in Russia
Russia
and Ukraine) as a means to acquire state property. Historian Edward L
[...More...]

"Russian Oligarch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Online Newspaper
An online newspaper is the online version of a newspaper, either as a stand-alone publication or as the online version of a printed periodical. Going online created more opportunities for newspapers, such as competing with broadcast journalism in presenting breaking news in a more timely manner. The credibility and strong brand recognition of well established newspapers, and the close relationships they have with advertisers, are also seen by many in the newspaper industry as strengthening their chances of survival.[1] The movement away from the printing process can also help decrease costs. Online newspapers, like printed newspapers, have legal restrictions regarding libel, privacy and copyright,[2] also apply to online publications in most countries as in the UK. Also, the UK Data Protection Act applies to online newspapers and news pages.[3] Up to 2014, the PCC ruled in the UK, but there was no clear distinction between authentic online newspapers and forums or blogs
[...More...]

"Online Newspaper" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wapping Dispute
The Wapping
Wapping
dispute was a lengthy failed strike by print workers in London
London
in 1986. Print unions tried to block distribution of The Sunday Times, along with other newspapers in Rupert Murdoch's News International
News International
group, after production was shifted to a new plant in Wapping
Wapping
in January 1986. At the new facility, modern computer facilities allowed journalists to input copy directly, rather than involving print union workers who insisted on using outdated "hot-metal" Linotype printing methods. All of the workers were dismissed
[...More...]

"Wapping Dispute" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
[...More...]

"OCLC" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Newspaper Circulation
A newspaper's circulation is the number of copies it distributes on an average day. Circulation is one of the principal factors used to set advertising rates. Circulation is not always the same as copies sold, often called paid circulation, since some newspapers are distributed without cost to the reader. Readership figures are usually higher than circulation figures because of the assumption that a typical copy of the newspaper is read by more than one person. In many countries, circulations are audited by independent bodies such as the Audit
Audit
Bureau of Circulations to assure advertisers that a given newspaper does indeed reach the number of people claimed by the publisher
[...More...]

"Newspaper Circulation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Chris Blackhurst
Chris
Chris
is a short form of various names including Christopher, Christian, Christina, Christine, and Christos. Unlike these names, however, it does not indicate the person's gender, although it is much more common for males to have this name than it is for females, due to the increased popularity of Chrissy and Christy among younger females.[1][not in citation given] Chris
Chris
is also used as a name in its own right, although it is not as common.[2] It is the preferred form of the full name of such notable individuals as Chris Tucker
Chris Tucker
and Chris
Chris
Penn. To find an article about one of these people, see List of all pages beginning with "Chris". The word is also part of phrases, including Tropical Storm Chris, Ruth's Chris
Chris
Steak House, and many more which refer to notable people, places, and things
[...More...]

"Chris Blackhurst" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Conrad Black
Conrad Moffat Black, Baron Black of Crossharbour,[3] KSG (born 25 August 1944) is a British former newspaper publisher, author, and convicted felon
[...More...]

"Conrad Black" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.