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The Guardian
The Guardian
The Guardian
is a British daily newspaper. It was known from 1821 until 1959 as the Manchester
Manchester
Guardian. Along with its sister papers The Observer and the Guardian Weekly, The Guardian
The Guardian
is part of the Guardian Media Group, owned by the Scott Trust
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Newspaper Circulation
A newspaper's circulation is the number of copies it distributes on an average day. Circulation is one of the principal factors used to set advertising rates. Circulation is not always the same as copies sold, often called paid circulation, since some newspapers are distributed without cost to the reader. Readership figures are usually higher than circulation figures because of the assumption that a typical copy of the newspaper is read by more than one person. In many countries, circulations are audited by independent bodies such as the Audit
Audit
Bureau of Circulations to assure advertisers that a given newspaper does indeed reach the number of people claimed by the publisher
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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Social Liberalism
Social liberalism
Social liberalism
(also known as modern liberalism in the United States)[1] is a political ideology and a variety of liberalism that endorses a market economy and the expansion of civil and political rights, and also believes that the legitimate role of the government includes addressing economic and social issues such as poverty, health care and education.[2][3][4] Under social liberalism, the good of the community is viewed as harmonious with the freedom of the individual.[5] Social liberal policies have been widely adopted in much of the capitalist world, particularly followin
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Scoop (news)
In journalism, a scoop or exclusive is an item of news reported by one journalist or news organization before others, and of exceptional originality, importance, surprise, excitement, or secrecy. Scoops are important and likely to interest or concern many people. A scoop is typically a new story, or a new aspect to an existing or breaking news story. Generally the story is unexpected, or surprising, or formerly secret, so the scoop typically comes from an exclusive source. Events witnessed by many people generally cannot become scoops, (e.g., a natural disaster, or the announcement at a press conference). However, exclusive news content is not always a scoop, as it may not provide the requisite importance or excitement
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Nonconformism
In English church history, a nonconformist was a Protestant who did not "conform" to the governance and usages of the established Church of England. Broad use of the term was precipitated after the Restoration of the British monarchy in 1660, when the Act of Uniformity 1662 re-established the opponents of reform within the Church of England. By the late 19th century the term specifically included the Reformed Christians (Presbyterians, Congregationalists and other Calvinist
Calvinist
sects), plus the Baptists
Baptists
and Methodists
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Centre-left Politics
Centre-left politics or center-left politics (American English), also referred to as moderate-left politics, is an adherence to views leaning to the left-wing, but closer to the centre on the left–right political spectrum than other left-wing variants
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Berliner (format)
Berliner, or "midi", is a newspaper format with pages normally measuring about 315 by 470 millimetres (12.4 in × 18.5 in)
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Manchester Observer
Non-conformist
Non-conformist
Liberal glishCeased publication 1821Headquarters ManchesterThe Manchester
Manchester
Observer was a short-lived non-conformist Liberal newspaper based in Manchester, England. Its radical agenda led to an invitation to Henry "Orator" Hunt to speak at a public meeting in Manchester
Manchester
led to the Peterloo massacre, and the shutdown of the newspaper.[1]Contents1 Background 2 Publication 3 Peterloo Massacre 4 Closure by repeated prosecution 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] By 1819, the allocation of Parliamentary constituencies did not reflect the distribution of population. The major urban centres of Manchester, Salford, Bolton, Blackburn, Rochdale, Ashton-under-Lyne, Oldham
Oldham
and Stockport, with a combined population of almost one million, were represented only by their county MPs; and very few inhabitants had the vote
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OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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Little Circle
The Little Circle was a Manchester-based group of Non-conformist Liberals who held a common agenda with regards political and social reform. The first group met from 1815 onwards to reform political representation and gain social reform in the United Kingdom. The second group operated from 1830 onwards and was key in creating the popularist movement that resulted in the Reform Act 1832.Contents1 Background 2 First Little Circle 3 Second Little Circle 4 Legacy 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] By 1819, Lancashire was represented by two members of parliament (MPs)
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Jeremiah Garnett
Jeremiah Garnett (1793–1870) was an English journalist, active in the politics of Lancashire
Lancashire
and the founding of The Guardian alongside his nephew Anthony Garnett. Life[edit] Jeremiah, younger brother of Richard Garnett (1789–1850) and elder brother of Thomas Garnett the manufacturer, was born at Otley
Otley
in Yorkshire, 2 October 1793. After being apprenticed to a printer at Barnsley, he entered the office of Wheeler's Manchester
Manchester
Chronicle about 1814, and with a brief interruption continued there until 1821, when he joined John Edward Taylor in establishing the Manchester Guardian. Garnett was printer, business manager, and sole reporter during the first years of the journal
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Tabloid (newspaper Format)
A tabloid is a newspaper with a compact page size smaller than broadsheet. A tabloid is defined as "roughly 17 by 11 inches (432 by 279 mm)" and commonly "half the size of a broadsheet", although there is no standard size for this newspaper format. The term tabloid journalism refers to an emphasis on such topics as sensational crime stories, astrology, celebrity gossip and television, and is not a reference to newspapers printed in this format. Some small-format papers with a high standard of journalism refer to themselves as compact newspapers. Larger newspapers, traditionally associated with higher-quality journalism, are called broadsheets, even if the newspaper is now printed on smaller pages
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Offshore Bank
An offshore bank is a bank regulated under international banking license (often called offshore license), which usually prohibits the bank from establishing any business activities in the jurisdiction of establishment. Due to less regulations and transparency, accounts with offshore banks were often used to hide undeclared income. Since the 1980's, jurisdictions that provide financial services to nonresidents on a big scale, can be referred to as offshore financial centres. Since OFCs often also levy little or no tax corporate and/or personal income and offer , they are often referred to as tax havens. With worldwide increasing measures on CFT (combatting the financing of terrorism) and AML (anti-money laundering) compliance, the offshore banking sector in most jurisdictions was subject to changing regulations
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Typographical Error
A typographical error (often shortened to typo), also called misprint, is a mistake made in the typing process (such as a spelling mistake)[2] of printed material. Historically, this referred to mistakes in manual type-setting (typography). The term includes errors due to mechanical failure or slips of the hand or finger,[3] but excludes errors of ignorance, such as spelling errors, or the flip-flopping of words such as "than" and "then". Before the arrival of printing, the "copyist's mistake" or "scribal error" was the equivalent for manuscripts. Most typos involve simple duplication, omission, transposition, or substitution of a small number of characters. Fat finger, or "fat finger syndrome", a slang term, refers to an unwanted secondary action when typing. When one's finger is bigger than the touch zone, there can be inaccuracy in the fine motor movements and accidents occur. This is common with touchscreens. One may hit two adjacent keys on the keyboard in a single keystroke
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Whistleblower
A whistleblower (also written as whistle-blower or whistle blower)[1] is a person who exposes any kind of information or activity that is deemed illegal, unethical, or not correct within an organization that is either private or public.[2] The information of alleged wrongdoing can be classified in many ways: violation of company policy/rules, law, regulation, or threat to public interest/national security, as well as fraud, and corruption.[3] Those who become whistleblowers can choose to bring information or allegations to surface either internally or externally. Internally, a whistleblower can bring his/her accusations to the attention of other people within the accused organization such as an immediate supervisor
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