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The Exodus
The Exodus[a] is the founding myth of Israel, telling how the Israelites
Israelites
were delivered from slavery by their god Yahweh
Yahweh
and therefore belong to him through the Mosaic covenant.[1][b] Spread over the books of Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy, it tells of the events that befell the
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Egyptians
Egyptians
Egyptians
(Egyptian Arabic: مَصريين‎  IPA: [mɑsˤɾɪjˈjiːn]; Maṣreyyīn; Arabic: مِصريّون‎; Coptic: ⲛⲓⲣⲉⲙⲛ̀ⲭⲏⲙⲓ Ni/rem/en/kīmi) are an ethnic group native to Egypt
Egypt
and the citizens of that country sharing a common culture and a common dialect known as Egyptian Arabic. Egyptian identity
Egyptian identity
is closely tied to geography. The population of Egypt
Egypt
is concentrated in the lower Nile
Nile
Valley, the small strip of cultivable land stretching from the First Cataract to the Mediterranean and enclosed by desert both to the east and to the west. This unique geography has been the basis of the development of Egyptian society since antiquity. The daily language of the Egyptians
Egyptians
is the local variety of Arabic, known as Egyptian Arabic or Masri
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Midian
Midian
Midian
(/ˈmɪdiən/; Hebrew: מִדְיָן‬), Madyan (Arabic: مَـدْيَـن‎), or Madiam (Greek: Μαδιάμ)[1] is a geographical place mentioned in the Torah
Torah
and Qur’an. William G. Dever states that biblical Midian
Midian
was in the "northwest Arabian Peninsula, on the east shore of the Gulf of Aqaba
Gulf of Aqaba
on the Red Sea", an area which he notes was "never extensively settled until the 8th-7th century B.C."[2] According to the Book of Genesis, the Midianites were the descendants of Midian, who was a son of Abraham
Abraham
and his wife Keturah: "Abraham took a wife, and her name was Keturah
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Destroying Angel (Bible)
The Destroying Angel or Angel of Death in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
is an entity sent out by Yahweh
Yahweh
on several occasions to kill enemies of the Israelites. In 2 Samuel
2 Samuel
24:15, it kills the inhabitants of Jerusalem. In I Chronicles
I Chronicles
21:15, the same "angel of the Lord" is seen by David to stand "between the earth and the heaven, with a drawn sword in his hand stretched out against Jerusalem." Later, the angel of the Lord kills 185,000 men of Sennacherib's Assyrian army, thereby saving Hezekiah's Jerusalem in II Kings 19:35. The angel (malak) is referred to under various terms, including Mashḥit (pron
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Hecht Museum
The Reuben and Edith Hecht Museum
Hecht Museum
is a museum located on the grounds of the University of Haifa,[1] Israel.Contents1 History 2 Exhibits 3 Activities 4 Journal 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]Ma'agan Michael boatThe Hecht Museum
Hecht Museum
was established in 1984 by Reuben Hecht,[1] director of Dagon Silos and a founding member of the University of Haifa
Haifa
Board of Governors. For sixty years, Hecht collected archaeological artefacts representing the material culture of the Land of Israel
Israel
in ancient times. He was particularly interested in finds from the Canaanite period to the end of the Byzantine period
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Book Of Amos
The Book
Book
of Amos is the third of the Twelve Minor Prophets
Twelve Minor Prophets
in the Hebrew Bible/ Old Testament
Old Testament
and the second in the Greek Septuagint tradition.[1] Amos, an older contemporary of Hosea
Hosea
and Isaiah,[2] was active c. 750 BC during the reign of Jeroboam II[2] (788–747 BC),[3] making the Book
Book
of Amos the first biblical prophetic book written. Amos lived in the kingdom of Judah but preached in the northern kingdom of Israel.[2] His major themes of social justice, God's omnipotence, and divine judgment became staples of prophecy.[2]Contents1 Structure 2 Summary 3 Composition 4 Themes 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksStructure[edit]Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 846: Amos 2
Amos 2
(LXX)(Michael D. Coogan, A Brief Introduction to the Old Testament, 2009, p
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Book Of Hosea
The Book
Book
of Hosea
Hosea
is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. According to the traditional order of most Hebrew Bibles, it is the first of the twelve Minor Prophets. Set around the fall of the Northern Kingdom of Israel, the Book
Book
of Hosea
Hosea
denounces the worship of gods other than Yahweh, metaphorically comparing Israel’s abandonment of Yahweh to a woman being unfaithful to her husband. According to the book’s narrative, the relationship between Hosea
Hosea
and his unfaithful wife Gomer is comparable to the relationship between Yahweh and his unfaithful people Israel
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Kingdom Of Israel (Samaria)
According to the Hebrew
Hebrew
Bible, the Kingdom of Israel
Israel
(Hebrew: מַמְלֶכֶת יִשְׂרָאֵל‬, Modern Mamlekhet Yisra'el, Tiberian Mamléḵeṯ Yiśrāʼēl) was one of two successor states to the former United Kingdom of
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Book Of Micah
The Book
Book
of Micah is a prophetic book in the Tanakh / Old Testament, and the sixth of the twelve minor prophets.[1] It records the sayings of Micah, whose name is Mikayahu,(Hebrew: מִיכָיָ֫הוּ ) meaning "Who is like Yahweh?",[2] an 8th-century B.C
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Kingdom Of Judah
The Kingdom of Judah
Kingdom of Judah
(Hebrew: מַמְלֶכֶת יְהוּדָה‬, Mamlekhet Yehudāh) was an Iron Age
Iron Age
kingdom of the Southern Levant. The Hebrew
Hebrew
Bible
Bible
depicts it as the successor to a United Monarchy, but historians are divided about the veracity of this account
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Jan Assmann
Jan Assmann
Jan Assmann
(born Johann Christoph Assmann; born 7 July 1938) is a German Egyptologist.Contents1 Life and Works 2 Writings on Egyptian and other religions 3 Awards 4 Publications 5 References 6 External linksLife and Works[edit] Assmann studied Egyptology
Egyptology
and classical archaeology in Munich, Heidelberg, Paris, and Göttingen. In 1966-67, he was a fellow of the German Archaeological Institute
German Archaeological Institute
in Cairo, where he continued as an independent scholar from 1967 to 1971. After completing his habilitation in 1971, he was named a professor of Egyptology
Egyptology
at the University of Heidelberg
University of Heidelberg
in 1976, where he taught until his retirement in 2003
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Mount Nebo
Mount Nebo
Mount Nebo
(Arabic: جبل نيبو‎ Jabal Nībū; Hebrew: הַר נְבוֹ‬ Har Nevo) is an elevated ridge in Jordan, approximately 710 metres (2,330 ft) above sea level, mentioned in the Hebrew Bible as the place where Moses
Moses
was granted a view of the Promised Land. The view from the summit provides a panorama of the Holy Land and, to the north, a more limited one of the valley of the River Jordan
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Akhenaten
Akhetaten, Gempaaten, Hwt-BenbenReligion Ancient Egyptian religion Atenism Akhenaten
Akhenaten
(/ˌækəˈnɑːtən/;[1] also spelled Echnaton,[7] Akhenaton,[8] Ikhnaton,[9] and Khuenaten;[10][11] meaning "Effective for Aten"), known before the fifth year of his reign as Amenhotep IV (sometimes given its Greek form, Amenophis IV, and meaning " Amun
Amun
Is Satisfied"), was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh of the 18th Dynasty
18th Dynasty
who ruled for 17 years and died perhaps in 1336 BC or 1334 BC. He is noted for abandoning traditional Egyptian polytheism and introducing worship centered on the Aten, which is sometimes described as monolatristic, henotheistic, or even quasi-monotheistic
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Habiru
Habiru
Habiru
(sometimes written as Hapiru, and more accurately 'Apiru, meaning "dusty, dirty") is a term used in 2nd millennium BCE texts throughout the Fertile Crescent
Fertile Crescent
for people variously described as rebels, outlaws, raiders, mercenaries, bowmen, servants, slaves, and laborers.[1] [2] [3][4][5] The d
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Sea Peoples
The Sea Peoples
Sea Peoples
are a purported seafaring confederation that attacked ancient Egypt
Egypt
and other regions of the East Mediterranean prior to and during the
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Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egypt
Egypt
was a civilization of ancient Northeastern Africa, concentrated along the lower reaches of the Nile
Nile
River in the place that is now the country Egypt
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