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The Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie
The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
Bourgeoisie
(French: Le Charme discret de la bourgeoisie) is a 1972 surrealist film directed by Luis Buñuel[1] and written by Jean-Claude Carrière
Jean-Claude Carrière
in collaboration with the director.[2] The film was made in France and is mainly in French, with some dialogue in Spanish. The narrative concerns a group of upper middle class people attempting—despite continual interruptions—to dine together. The film received the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film and a nomination for Best Original Screenplay.[3]Contents1 Overview 2 Plot 3 Cast 4 Production4.1 Pre-production 4.2 Filming and editing5 Reception 6 Awards 7 Adaptations 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksOverview[edit] The film consists of several thematically linked scenes: five gatherings of a group of bourgeois friends, and the four dreams of different characters
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David Ives
David Ives (born July 11, 1950) is an American playwright, screenwriter, and novelist. He is perhaps best known for his comic one-act plays; the New York Times in 1997 referred to him as the "maestro of the short form".[1] Ives has also written dramatic plays, narrative stories, and screenplays, has adapted French 17th and 18th-century classical comedies, and adapted 33 musicals for New York City's Encores! series.[2][3]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Theater 3 Musical theatre 4 Narrative fiction 5 Personal 6 References 7 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Ives wrote his first play when he was nine. He attended a boys Catholic seminary. “We would-be priests were groomed for gravitas,” he has said. At the end of the year the seniors could be a part of a school show called “The Senior Mock,” in which the students satirized the teachers
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Terrorism
Terrorism
Terrorism
is, in the broadest sense, the use of intentionally indiscriminate violence as a means to create terror among masses of people; or fear to achieve a financial, political, religious or ideological aim.[1] It is used in this regard primarily to refer to violence against peacetime targets or in war against non-combatants.[2] The terms "terrorist" and "terrorism" originated during the French Revolution
French Revolution
of the late 18th century[3] but gained mainstream popularity during the U.S. Presidency of Ronald Reagan (1981–89) after the 1983 Beirut barracks bombings[4] and again after the attacks on New York City and Washington, D.C
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Commissaire De Police
Commissaire de police is a rank in the French National Police. It should not be confused with the French appointment of "armed forces commissary" (commissaire des armées) which is an administrative military position. Overview[edit] Every commune with a population of more than 30,000-50,000 has a commissaire in charge of its detachment of the National Police, and larger communes have more than one (the Prefecture of Police of Paris has well over one hundred). A commissaire has both an administrative role and an investigative role. Most officers join directly at the rank of commissaire. All are university graduates, usually in law, and have completed a further training course. It is also possible for junior officers to be promoted to the rank (something which was virtually impossible until relatively recently)
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Brigadier
Brigadier
Brigadier
/brɪɡəˈdɪər/ is a military rank, the seniority of which depends on the country. In some countries, it is a senior rank above colonel, equivalent to a brigadier general, typically commanding a brigade of several thousand soldiers. In other countries, it is a non-commissioned rank (e.g
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Robert Benayoun
Robert Benayoun (1926 in Kenitra, Morocco
Morocco
– 20 October 1996, Paris) was a French film critic and author, and one-time member of the jury at the Cannes Film Festival of 1980. He wrote books on Tex Avery, Woody Allen, Buster Keaton, the Marx Brothers, and Alain Resnais.[1] He wrote screenplays for and directed three films. Benayoun was one of comedian Jerry Lewis's greatest supporters and directed a film about him called Bonjour Mr. Lewis. He also directed the 1975 film Serious as Pleasure.[1] References[edit]^ a b James Kirkup (November 8, 1996). "Obituary: Robert Benayoun". The Independent. External links[edit] Robert Benayoun on IMDbAuthority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 44295245 LCCN: n80115893 ISNI: 0000 0001 0892 576X GND: 171972163 SUDOC: 026717298 BNF: cb118911660 (data) BIBSYS: 90078001 RKD: 365085 SNAC: w6bz6rx2This article about a French writer or poet is a stub
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Claude Piéplu
Claude Léon Auguste Piéplu (9 May 1923, Paris–24 May 2006, Paris) was a French film and television actor. Filmography[edit]Shadoks et le Big Blank, Les (2000) (TV) Astérix et Obélix contre César (1999) Chapeau bas (1998) Entre terre et mer (1997) (TV miniseries) Fallait pas! Voyage de Pénélope, Le (1996) (TV) Un amour impossible (1996) (TV) Faussaires, Les (1994) Maigret: Cécile est morte (1994) (TV) Silence du coeur, Le (1994) (TV) Casque bleu (1994) D 14 (1993) Années de plumes, années de plomb (1991) (TV) Après après-demain (1990) Suivez cet avion (1989) Un coupable (1988) (TV) Palace (1988) (TV) (miniseries) Beau temps mais orageux en fin de journée (1986) Paltoquet, Le (1986) Matics, Les (1986) TV Series (voice) Galette du roi, La (1986) Mon meilleur Noël (TV episode: L'oiseau bleu (1985)) Allô Béatrice (TV episode: Charmant week-end (1984)) Emmenez-moi au théâtre: Un habit pour l'hiver (1982) Merci Bernard (1982) Histoire contemporaine (1981) (TV) (min
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Vincent Canby
Vincent Canby
Vincent Canby
(July 27, 1924 – October 15, 2000) was an American film and theatre critic who served as the chief film critic for The New York Times from 1969 until the early 1990s, then its chief theatre critic from 1994 until his death in 2000. He reviewed more than one thousand films during his tenure there.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Canby was born in Chicago, the son of Katharine Anne (née Vincent) and Lloyd Canby.[2] He attended boarding school in Christchurch, Virginia, with novelist William Styron; and the two became friends. He introduced Styron to the works of E.B. White
E.B. White
and Ernest Hemingway; and the pair hitchhiked to Richmond to buy For Whom the Bell Tolls.[3] After war service in the Pacific theater, he attended Dartmouth College. Career[edit] He obtained his first job as a journalist in 1948 for the Chicago Journal of Commerce
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Newsweek
Newsweek
Newsweek
is an American weekly magazine founded in 1933. Between 2008 and 2012, Newsweek
Newsweek
underwent internal and external contractions designed to shift the magazine's focus and audience while improving its finances. Instead, losses accelerated: revenue dropped 38 percent from 2007 to 2009. The revenue declines prompted an August 2010 sale by owner The Washington Post Company
The Washington Post Company
to audio pioneer Sidney Harman—for a purchase price of one dollar and an assumption of the magazine's liabilities.[3][4] In November 2010, Newsweek
Newsweek
merged with the news and opinion website The Daily Beast, forming The Newsweek
Newsweek
Daily Beast Company, after negotiations between the owners of the two publications. Tina Brown, The Daily Beast's editor-in-chief, served as the editor of both publications
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George Cukor
George Dewey
George Dewey
Cukor (/ˈkjuːkər/; July 7, 1899 – January 24, 1983) was an American film director.[1] He mainly concentrated on comedies and literary adaptations. His career flourished at RKO
RKO
when David O. Selznick, the studio's Head of Production, assigned Cukor to direct several of RKO's major films, including What Price Hollywood? (1932), A Bill of Divorcement (1932), Our Betters
Our Betters
(1933), and Little Women (1933)
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Teahouse
A teahouse is an establishment which primarily serves tea and other light refreshments. Sometimes the word "tea" is also used to refer to a meal. Although the functions of teahouses vary widely in different countries, teahouses often serve as centers of social interaction, like coffeehouses. Some cultures have a variety of distinct tea-centered establishments of different types, depending on the national tea culture
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Arsenic Poisoning
Arsenic
Arsenic
poisoning is a medical condition that occurs due to elevated levels of arsenic in the body.[4] If arsenic poisoning occurs over a brief period of time symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, encephalopathy, and watery diarrhea that contains blood.[1] Long-term exposure can result in thickening of the skin, darker skin, abdominal pain, diarrhea, heart disease, numbness, and cancer.[1] The most common reason for long-term exposure is contaminated drinking water.[3] Groundwater
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Cocaine
Cocaine, also known as coke, is a strong stimulant mostly used as a recreational drug.[10] It is commonly snorted, inhaled as smoke, or as a solution injected into a vein.[9] Mental effects may include loss of contact with reality, an intense feeling of happiness, or agitation.[9] Physical symptoms may include a fast heart rate, sweating, and large pupils.[9] High doses can result in very high blood pressure or body temperature.[11] Effects begin within seconds to minutes of use and last between five and ninety minutes.[9] Cocaine has a small number of accepted medical uses such as numbing and decreasing bleeding during nasal surgery.[12] Cocaine
Cocaine
is
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Alfred Hitchcock
Sir
Sir
Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE
KBE
(13 August 1899 – 29 April 1980) was an English film director and producer, widely regarded as one of the most influential filmmakers in the history of cinema. He directed 53 feature films[a] in a career spanning six decades, becoming as well-known as any of his actors thanks to his many interviews, his cameo roles in most of his films, and his hosting of Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1955–1965). Born on the outskirts of London, Hitchcock entered the film industry in 1919 as a title card designer after training as a technical clerk and copy writer for a telegraph-cable company
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Logic
Logic
Logic
(from the Ancient Greek: λογική, translit. logikḗ[1]), originally meaning "the word" or "what is spoken", but coming to mean "thought" or "reason", is a subject concerned with the most general laws of truth,[2] and is now generally held to consist of the systematic study of the form of valid inference. A valid inference is one where there is a specific relation of logical support between the assumptions of the inference and its conclusion. (In ordinary discourse, inferences may be signified by words like therefore, hence, ergo, and so on.) There is no universal agreement as to the exact scope and subject matter of logic (see § Rival conceptions, below), but it has traditionally included the classification of arguments, the systematic exposition of the 'logical form' common to all valid arguments, the study of inference, including fallacies, and the study of semantics, including paradoxes
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Billy Wilder
Samuel "Billy" Wilder (/ˈwaɪldər/; German: [ˈvɪldɐ]; June 22, 1906 – March 27, 2002) was an Austrian-American filmmaker, screenwriter, producer, artist, and journalist whose career spanned more than five decades. He is regarded as one of the most brilliant and versatile filmmakers of Hollywood's golden age. With The Apartment, Wilder became the first person to win Academy Awards
Academy Awards
as producer, director, and screenwriter for the same film.[1] Wilder became a screenwriter in the late 1920s while living in Berlin. After the rise of the Nazi Party, he left for Paris, where he made his directorial debut. He moved to Hollywood
Hollywood
in 1933, and in 1939 he had a hit when he co-wrote the screenplay for the romantic comedy Ninotchka, starring Greta Garbo. Wilder established his directorial reputation with an adaption of James M. Cain's Double Indemnity (1944), a film noir
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