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The Crystal Palace
The Crystal Palace
The Crystal Palace
was a cast-iron and plate-glass structure originally built in Hyde Park, London, to house the Great Exhibition of 1851
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Thomas Leverton Donaldson
Thomas Leverton
Thomas Leverton
Donaldson (19 October 1795 – 1 August 1885) was a British architect, notable as a pioneer in architectural education, as a co-founder and President of the Royal Institute of British Architects and a winner of the RIBA Royal Gold Medal. Thomas Leverton
Thomas Leverton
DonaldsonLife[edit]The church of Holy Trinity, Brompton Busbridge Church
Busbridge Church
of Gothic Revival style in Godalming, United Kingdom. Dedication in 1867.Donaldson was born in Bloomsbury Square, London, the eldest son of architect, James Donaldson
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Rundbogenstil
Rundbogenstil
Rundbogenstil
(Round-arch style), is a nineteenth-century historic revival style of architecture popular in the German-speaking lands and the German diaspora
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Isambard Kingdom Brunel
Isambard Kingdom Brunel
Isambard Kingdom Brunel
FRS (/ˈɪzəmˌbɑːd bruːˈnɛl/; 9 April 1806 – 15 September 1859), was an English mechanical and civil engineer who is considered "one of the most ingenious and prolific figures in engineering history",[1] "one of the 19th century engineering giants",[2] and "one of the greatest figures of the Industrial Revolution, [who] changed the face of the English landscape with his groundbreaking designs and ingenious constructions".[3] Brunel built dockyards, the Great Western Railway, a series of steamships including the first propeller-driven transatlantic steamship, and numerous important bridges and tunnels
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Robert Stephenson
Robert Stephenson
Robert Stephenson
FRS[1] (16 October 1803 – 12 October 1859) was an early railway and civil engineer. The only son of George Stephenson, the "Father of Railways",[2] he built on the achievements of his father. Robert has been called the greatest engineer of the 19th century.[3] Robert was born in Willington Quay, Northumberland, to George and Frances née Henderson, before they moved to Killingworth, where Robert was taught at the local village school. Robert attended the middle-class Percy Street Academy in Newcastle and at the age of fifteen was apprenticed to the mining engineer Nicholas Wood. He left before he had completed his three years to help his father survey the Stockton and Darlington
Darlington
Railway. Robert spent six months at Edinburgh University before working for three years as a mining engineer in Colombia
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Duke Of Buccleuch
The title Duke of Buccleuch
Duke of Buccleuch
/bəˈkluː/, formerly also spelt Duke of Buccleugh, is a title created twice in the Peerage of Scotland. The second creation dates to the 20 April 1663. The Dukedom was for the Duke of Monmouth, who was the eldest illegitimate son of Charles II of Scotland, England, and Ireland, and who had married Anne Scott, 4th Countess of Buccleuch. The Duke also holds the Dukedom of Queensberry, created in 1684. Anne Scott was created Duchess of Buccleuch in her own right along with her husband, James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth; thus, her title was unaffected by Monmouth's attainder of 1685. The title passed on to their descendants, who have successively borne the surnames Scott, Montagu-Scott, Montagu Douglas Scott and Scott again
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Earl Of Ellesmere
Earl of Ellesmere, of Ellesmere in the County of Shropshire (pronounced "Ells-mere"), is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1846 for the Conservative politician Lord Francis Egerton. He was granted the subsidiary title of Viscount Brackley, of Brackley
Brackley
in the County of Northampton, at the same time, also in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. Born Lord Francis Leveson-Gower, he was the third son of George Leveson-Gower, 1st Duke of Sutherland and Elizabeth Gordon, 19th Countess of Sutherland. In 1803 his father had inherited the substantial estates of his maternal uncle Francis Egerton, 3rd Duke of Bridgewater. On his father's death in 1833, Lord Francis succeeded to the Egerton estates according to the will of the late Duke of Bridgewater, and assumed by Royal licence the surname of Egerton in lieu of Leveson-Gower
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Palm House
A palm house is a greenhouse that is specialised for the growing of palms and other tropical and subtropical plants. Palm houses require constant heat and were built as status symbols in Victorian Britain. Several examples of these ornate glass and iron structures can still be found in major parks such as Liverpool's Sefton Park
Sefton Park
and Stanley Park.[1]The Palm House at Royal Botanic Gardens, KewOne of the earliest examples of a palm house is located in the Belfast Botanic Gardens. Designed by Charles Lanyon, the building was completed in 1840. It was constructed by iron-maker Richard Turner, who would later also build the Palm House at Kew. The latter, designed by Decimus Burton
Decimus Burton
and Nicole Burton, was the first large-scale structural use of wrought iron and was built between 1844 and 1848.[2][3][4] See also[edit]Palmenhaus SchönbrunnReferences[edit]^ "Palm House and Rose Garden". Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
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Wormwood Scrubs
Coordinates: 51°31′17″N 00°14′20″W / 51.52139°N 0.23889°W / 51.52139; -0.23889Looking east from the south-western edge of Wormwood ScrubsWormwood Scrubs, known locally as The Scrubs (or simply Scrubs), is an open space located in the north-eastern corner of the London
London
Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham in west London. It is the largest open space in the Borough, at 80 ha (200 acres), and one of the largest areas of common in London. The eastern part, known as Little Wormwood Scrubs, is cut off by Scrubs Lane and the West London
London
Line railway. It has been an open public space since the Wormwood Scrubs
Wormwood Scrubs
Act of 1879. The southern edge of the Scrubs is the site of two locally important buildings. At the western end is HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs, built between 1875 and 1891 by convict labour
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Cast Plate Glass
Architectural glass
Architectural glass
is glass that is used as a building material. It is most typically used as transparent glazing material in the building envelope, including windows in the external walls. Glass
Glass
is also used for internal partitions and as an architectural feature
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Battersea Park
Battersea
Battersea
Park is a 200-acre (83-hectare) green space at Battersea
Battersea
in the London
London
Borough of Wandsworth in London
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Isle Of Dogs
The Isle of Dogs
Isle of Dogs
is an area in the East End
East End
of London
London
that is bounded on three sides (east, south and west) by one of the largest meanders in the River Thames. The northern boundary has never been clearly or consistently defined but many accept it to be the (former) line of the West India South Dock
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Victoria Park, London
Victoria Park (known colloquially as Vicky Park or the People's Park) is a park and neighbourhood[1] in the East End of London, England.[2][3] The park is 86.18 hectares of open space [4], the park opened in 1845 and stretches out across part of Tower Hamlets, bordering parts of Bethnal Green, South Hackney, Cambridge Heath and Old Ford, such as along Old Ford Road, London E3 and Victoria Park Road E9. The name has also been applied to the neighbourhood around it which is entirely within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets.Contents1 Park1.1 Facilities 1.2 History1.2.1 Origins 1.2.2 The People's Park 1.2.3 Second World War 1.2.4 Modern2 Transport 3 Awards 4 In popular culture 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksPark[edit] Facilities[edit] The park has two cafes, The Pavilion Cafe in the West and The Park Cafe in the East
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Regent's Park
Regent's Park
Regent's Park
(officially The Regent's Park) is one of the Royal Parks of London
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The Times
The Times
The Times
is a British daily (Monday to Saturday) national newspaper based in London, England. It began in 1785 under the title The Daily Universal Register, adopting its current name on 1 January 1788. The Times and its sister paper The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
(founded in 1821) are published by Times Newspapers, since 1981 a subsidiary of News UK, itself wholly owned by News Corp
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