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The College Of Richard Collyer
The College of Richard Collyer
The College of Richard Collyer
(colloquially Collyer’s /ˈkɒliərz/), formerly called Collyer’s School, is a coeducational sixth form college in Horsham, West Sussex, England. In recent years, the college has achieved the best A-level results in West Sussex
West Sussex
for state-run institutions and is widely regarded to be one of the best sixth form colleges in the country
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Sixth Form College
A sixth form college is an educational institution in England, Wales, Northern Ireland, Belize, the Caribbean, Malta, Norway, Brunei, and Malaysia, among others, where students aged 16 to 19 typically study for advanced school-level qualifications, such as A-levels, Business and Technology Education
Education
Council (BTEC) and the International Baccalaureate Diploma, or school-level qualifications such as General Certificate of Secondary Education
Education
(GCSE) examinations. In Singapore and India, this is known as a junior college
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Office For Standards In Education
The Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills (Ofsted) is a non-ministerial department of the UK government, reporting to Parliament. Ofsted
Ofsted
is responsible for inspecting a range of educational institutions, including state schools and some independent schools. It also inspects childcare, adoption and fostering agencies and initial teacher training, and regulates a range of early years and children’s social care services.[2] The Chief Inspector (HMCI) is appointed by an Order-in-Council and thus becomes an office holder under the Crown
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Boarding School
A boarding school provides education for pupils who live on the premises, as opposed to a day school. The word "boarding” is used in the sense of "room and board" i.e., lodging and meals. As they have existed for many centuries, and now extend across many countries, their function and ethos varies greatly. Traditionally, pupils stayed at the school for the length of the term; some schools facilitate returning home every weekend, and some welcome day pupils. Some are for either boys or girls while others are co-educational. In the United Kingdom, which has a rich history of such schools, many independent (private) schools offer boarding, but likewise so do a few dozen state schools, many of which serve children from remote areas. In the United States, most boarding schools cover grades seven or nine through grade twelve—the high school years
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Public School (United Kingdom)
A public school in England and Wales
England and Wales
is an older, student-selective, fee-charging independent secondary school that caters primarily for children aged between 11 or 13 and 18, and whose head teacher is a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference[1] (HMC). The term "public" should not be misunderstood to mean that these schools are part of the public sector (that is, funded from public taxes); they are in fact part of the private sector
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House System
The house system is a traditional feature of schools in Commonwealth countries, originating in England. This nomenclature does not apply to similar schools in the United States. The school is divided into subunits called 'houses' and each student is allocated to one house at the moment of enrollment. Houses may compete with one another at sports and maybe in other ways, thus providing a focus for group loyalty. Different schools will have different numbers of houses: some might have more than 10 houses (with as few as 50 students in each house) or as few as four or fewer (with as many as 200 students in each). In some cases, individual houses can be even larger, as in McCracken County High School in the U.S. state of Kentucky, whose five houses have nearly 400 students each.[1] Facilities, such as pastoral care, may be provided on a house basis to a greater or lesser extent depending on the type of school
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Evacuations Of Civilians In Britain During World War II
The evacuation of civilians in Britain during the Second World War was designed to protect people, especially children, from the risks associated with aerial bombing of cities by moving them to areas thought to be less at risk. Operation Pied Piper, which began on 1 September 1939, officially relocated more than 3.5 million people. There were further waves of official evacuation and re-evacuation from the south and east coasts in June 1940, when a seaborne invasion was expected, and from affected cities after the Blitz began in September 1940. There were also official evacuations from the UK to other parts of the British Empire, and many non-official evacuations within and from the UK
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Baby Boom
A 'baby boom' is a period marked by a significant increase of birth rate. This demographic phenomenon is usually ascribed within certain geographical bounds. People born during this period are often called baby boomers; however, some experts distinguish between those born during such demographic baby booms and those who identify with the overlapping cultural generations. The causes of baby booms involves various fertility factors. The most well-known baby boom occurred immediately after World War II during the Cold War. It was a change of trend that was largely unexpected, because in most countries it occurred in the midst of a period of improving economies and rising living standards.[1] The baby boom occurred in countries that experienced tremendous damage from the war and were going through dramatic economic hardships. These countries include Germany and Poland
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Grammar School
A grammar school is one of several different types of school in the history of education in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and other English-speaking countries, originally a school teaching Latin, but more recently an academically-oriented secondary school, differentiated in recent years from less academic Secondary Modern Schools. The original purpose of medieval grammar schools was the teaching of Latin. Over time the curriculum was broadened, first to include Ancient Greek, and later English and other European languages, natural sciences, mathematics, history, geography, and other subjects. In the late Victorian era
Victorian era
grammar schools were reorganised to provide secondary education throughout England and Wales; Scotland had developed a different system
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Education Act 1944
The Education Act 1944
Education Act 1944
(7 and 8 Geo 6 c. 31) made numerous major changes in the provision and governance of secondary schools in England and Wales. It is also known as the "Butler Act" after the Conservative politician R. A. Butler, who wrote the legislation after consultation with all parties. Historians consider it a "triumph for progressive reform," and it became a core element of the Post-war consensus supported by all major parties.[1] The Act was repealed in steps with the last parts repealed in 1996.[2]Contents1 Background 2 New policies 3 School meals and milk 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksBackground[edit] The Education Act of 1944 was an answer to surging social and educational demands created by the war and the widespread demands for social reform
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Flagellation
Flagellation
Flagellation
(Latin flagellum, "whip"), flogging, whipping or lashing is the act of beating the human body with special implements such as whips, lashes, rods, switches, the cat o' nine tails, the sjambok, etc. Typically, flogging is imposed on an unwilling subject as a punishment; however, it can also be submitted to willingly, or performed on oneself, in religious or sadomasochistic contexts. The strokes are usually aimed at the unclothed back of a person, in certain settings it can be extended to other corporeal areas
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Beacon Status
Beacon Status is a progressive educational initiative that the United Kingdom implemented based on the idea that organizational learning could be advanced through a competitive process of identifying successful organizations and recruiting them to disseminate their good practices.[1] The beacon status initiative was launched by the Department for Education and Skills (DfES) in partnership with the Learning and Skills Council
Learning and Skills Council
(LSC) in 1998 and ran through to August 2005 for primary and secondary schools in England
England
and Wales. Beacon Status was for providers funded by the Learning and Skills Council, which are mainly Further Education colleges
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Will (law)
SectionsAttestation clauseResiduary clauseIncorporation by referenceContestTestamentary capacityUndue influenceInsane delusion FraudNo-contest clauseProperty dispositionLapse and anti-lapseAdemption AbatementSatisfaction of legaciesActs of independent significanceElective share Pretermitted heirWills and conflict of lawsTrustsExpress ResultingConstructiveCommon typesBare DiscretionaryAccumulation and maintenanceInterest in possessionCharitable Purpose IncentiveOther typesProtective SpendthriftLife insurance RemainderLife interestReversionary interestTestamentaryHonorary Asset-protection Special
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Centre Of Vocational Excellence
Centre of Vocational Excellence (CoVE) is a status given to departments in further education colleges (and some third party training companies) in England. It is intended as a kind of quality guarantee for vocational teaching, and is awarded by the Learning and Skills Council if the teaching is of good quality and if the department offers a range of courses with progression routes up to Level 3 or beyond in the National Qualifications Framework. There currently 400 departments given the CoVE status. External links[edit] Learning and Skills Council
Learning and Skills Council
- CoVE scheme List of colleges with CoVE status ( Microsoft Excel
Microsoft Excel
spreadsheet)This article relating to education in the UK is a stub
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Saint
A saint (also historically known as a hallow) is a person who is recognized as having an exceptional degree of holiness or likeness or closeness to God.[1][2] Depending on the context and denomination, the term also retains its original Christian
Christian
meaning, as any believer who is "in Christ" and in whom Christ
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Jesuit
The Society of Jesus
Society of Jesus
(SJ – from Latin: Societas Iesu) is a scholarly religious congregation of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
which originated in sixteenth-century Spain. The members are called Jesuits.[2] The society is engaged in evangelization and apostolic ministry in 112 nations on six continents. Jesuits
Jesuits
work in education (founding schools, colleges, universities, and seminaries), intellectual research, and cultural pursuits. Jesuits
Jesuits
also give retreats, minister in hospitals and parishes, sponsor direct social ministries, and promote ecumenical dialogue. Ignatius of Loyola, a Basque nobleman from the Pyrenees
Pyrenees
area of northern Spain, founded the society after discerning his spiritual vocation while recovering from a wound sustained in the Battle of Pamplona
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