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The Atlantic
The Atlantic
The Atlantic
is an American magazine and multi-platform publisher, founded in 1857 as The Atlantic
The Atlantic
Monthly in Boston, Massachusetts. The magazine was created as a literary and cultural commentary magazine, and published leading writers' commentary on abolition, education, and other major issues in contemporary political affairs. The magazine's initiator, and one of the founders, was Francis H. Underwood,[3][4] The other founding sponsors were prominent writers including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and John Greenleaf Whittier.[5][6] James Russell Lowell
James Russell Lowell
was its first editor.[7] After struggling with financial hardship and a series of ownership changes since the late 20th century, the magazine was reformatted in the early 21st century as a general editorial magazine
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Workstation
A workstation is a special computer designed for technical or scientific applications. Intended primarily to be used by one person at a time, they are commonly connected to a local area network and run multi-user operating systems. The term workstation has also been used loosely to refer to everything from a mainframe computer terminal to a PC connected to a network, but the most common form refers to the group of hardware offered by several current and defunct companies such as Sun Microsystems, Silicon Graphics, Apollo Computer, DEC, HP, NeXT
NeXT
and IBM
IBM
which opened the door for the 3D graphics animation revolution of the late 1990s. Workstations offered higher performance than mainstream personal computers, especially with respect to CPU and graphics, memory capacity, and multitasking capability
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Thought Leader
A thought leader is an individual or firm that is recognized as an authority in a specialized field and whose expertise is sought and often rewarded.[1] The Oxford English Dictionary
Oxford English Dictionary
gives as its first citation for the phrase an 1887 description of Henry Ward Beecher
Henry Ward Beecher
as "one of the great thought-leaders in America." In a 1990 article in the Wall Street Journal
Wall Street Journal
Marketing
Marketing
section, Patrick Reilly used the term "thought leader publications" to refer to such magazines as Harper's
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Mashable
Mashable
Mashable
is a digital media website founded by Pete Cashmore
Pete Cashmore
in 2005.[7]Contents1 History 2 Mashable
Mashable
Awards 3 Mashable
Mashable
Connect conference 4 Mashable
Mashable
editions and subsidiaries 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] Mashable
Mashable
was created by Pete Cashmore
Pete Cashmore
from his home in Aberdeen, Scotland, in July 2005. Time noted Mashable
Mashable
as one of the 25 best blogs in 2009.[8][9] As of November 2015, it has over 6,000,000 Twitter
Twitter
followers and over 3,200,000 fans on Facebook
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Antislavery Movement In America
Abolitionism
Abolitionism
in the United States was the movement before and during the American Civil War
American Civil War
to end slavery in the United States. In the Americas and western Europe, abolitionism was a movement to end the Atlantic slave trade
Atlantic slave trade
and set slaves free. In the 17th century, English Quakers
Quakers
and Evangelicals condemned slavery as un-Christian. At that time, most slaves were Africans, but thousands of Native Americans were also enslaved. In the 18th century, as many as six million Africans were transported to the Americas as slaves, at least a third of them on British ships to North America
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Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Massachusetts
(/ˌmæsəˈtʃuːsɪts/ ( listen), /-zɪts/), officially known as the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England
New England
region of the northeastern United States. It is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the east, the states of Connecticut
Connecticut
and Rhode Island
Rhode Island
to the south, New Hampshire
New Hampshire
and Vermont
Vermont
to the north, and New York to the west. The state is named after the Massachusett
Massachusett
tribe, which once inhabited the east side of the area. The capital of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
and the most populous city in New England
New England
is Boston
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William Parker (abolitionist)
William Parker (1821 – April 14, 1891) was a former slave who escaped to Pennsylvania, where he became an abolitionist and anti-slavery activist in Christiana, where he was a farmer and led a black self-defense organization. He was notable as a principal figure in the Christiana incident (or riot), 1851, also known as the Christiana Resistance. Edward Gorsuch, a Maryland
Maryland
slaveowner who owned four slaves who had fled over the state border to Parker's farm, was killed and other white men in the party to capture the fugitives were wounded. The events brought national attention to the challenges of enforcing the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850. Upon Gorsuch's death, Parker fled the area traveling by the Underground Railroad
Underground Railroad
to Rochester, New York, where he met up with Frederick Douglass
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication, such as a magazine.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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American English
American English
American English
(AmE, AE, AmEng, USEng, en-US),[3] sometimes called United States
United States
English or U.S. English,[4][5] is the set of dialects of the English language
English language
native to the United States
United States
of America.[6] English is the most widely spoken language in the United States
United States
and is the common language used by the federal government, to the extent that all laws and compulsory education are practiced in English
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Washington, D.C
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
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Harvard University
Harvard University
Harvard University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation
Harvard Corporation
(formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
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Douglas Engelbart
Douglas Carl Engelbart (January 30, 1925 – July 2, 2013) was an American engineer and inventor, and an early computer and Internet pioneer. He is best known for his work on founding the field of human–computer interaction, particularly while at his Augmentation Research Center Lab in SRI International, which resulted in creation of the computer mouse, and the development of hypertext, networked computers, and precursors to graphical user interfaces. These were demonstrated at The Mother of All Demos
The Mother of All Demos
in 1968. Engelbart's Law, the observation that the intrinsic rate of human performance is exponential, is named after him. In the early 1950s, he decided that instead of "having a steady job" – such as his position at Ames Research Center
Ames Research Center
– he would focus on making the world a better place
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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
(February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet and educator whose works include "Paul Revere's Ride", The Song of Hiawatha, and Evangeline. He was also the first American to translate Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy
Divine Comedy
and was one of the five Fireside Poets
Fireside Poets
from New England. Longfellow was born in Portland, Maine, which was then still part of Massachusetts. He studied at Bowdoin College
Bowdoin College
and, after spending time in Europe, he became a professor at Bowdoin and later at Harvard College. His first major poetry collections were Voices of the Night (1839) and Ballads and Other Poems (1841). Longfellow retired from teaching in 1854 to focus on his writing, and he lived the remainder of his life in a former Revolutionary War headquarters of George Washington in Cambridge, Massachusetts
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The Conjure Woman
The Conjure Woman
The Conjure Woman
is an 1899 collection of short stories by American writer Charles W. Chesnutt. It is Chesnutt's first book, and an important work of African American literature. The seven stories deal with the racial issues facing the South after the war, often through the comments of the character of Uncle Julius McAdoo. A freed slave, he tells the stories to John and Annie, a white couple from the North, who are visiting in their search for property, as they are thinking of moving south (because of Annie's health) and of buying an old plantation in "Patesville", North Carolina. Uncle Julius's stories are derived from African-American folk tales and include many supernatural occurrences built around hoodoo conjuring traditions. They are less idealistic and romanticized than John's understanding of Southern culture
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson
Thomas Wentworth Higginson
Thomas Wentworth Higginson
(December 22, 1823 – May 9, 1911) was an American Unitarian minister, author, abolitionist, and soldier. He was active in the American Abolitionism movement during the 1840s and 1850s, identifying himself with disunion and militant abolitionism. He was a member of the Secret Six
Secret Six
who supported John Brown
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Ted Nelson
Theodor Holm "Ted" Nelson (born June 17, 1937) is an American pioneer of information technology, philosopher, and sociologist. He coined the terms hypertext and hypermedia in 1963 and published them in 1965.[1] Nelson coined the terms transclusion,[1] virtuality,[2] and intertwingularity (in Literary Machines), and teledildonics[3].Contents1 Early life and education 2 Project Xanadu 3 Other projects 4 ZigZag 5 Influence and recognition5.1 Neologisms6 Publications 7 References 8 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Nelson is the son of Emmy Award-winning director Ralph Nelson
Ralph Nelson
and the Academy Award-winning actress Celeste Holm.[4] His parents' marriage was brief and he was mostly raised by his grandparents, first in Chicago
Chicago
and later in Greenwich Village.[5] Nelson earned a BA from Swarthmore College
Swarthmore College
in 1959
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